Linked by _txf_ on Fri 29th Jul 2011 10:39 UTC
Legal For all the complaints that Spotify was taking too long to reach the US, they did in the end persevere. However, Spotify has just been rewarded with a patent infringement lawsuit for its troubles. Frankly, why should anyone else even bother?
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by fran on Fri 29th Jul 2011 11:17 UTC
fran
Member since:
2010-08-06

Welcome to the Soviet Union..I mean the US.

Seriously..a printed press article (cant cite it) few years back measured the red tape among the world economies.
Conclusion...the US, one of the most controlled economies in the world.

Edited 2011-07-29 11:29 UTC

Reply Score: 6

Does this really need answering?
by cmchittom on Fri 29th Jul 2011 13:00 UTC
cmchittom
Member since:
2011-03-18

Frankly, why should anyone else even bother?


Because Americans have a lot of money to spend on luxuries. I would've thought that was obvious.

Reply Score: 4

daedalus Member since:
2011-01-14


Because Americans have a lot of money to spend on luxuries.

Which they like to take back via the US legal system...

Reply Score: 3

vitae Member since:
2006-02-20

If that's true, I can't wait til I get my cut.

Reply Score: 2

Lennie Member since:
2007-09-22

If you are US-citizen, you should know wealth is not deviced equally in your country.

Reply Score: 2

Alfman Member since:
2011-01-28

Lennie,

"If you are US-citizen, you should know wealth is not deviced equally in your country."

Not many people appreciate the extent of the inequality.

http://www.stateofworkingamerica.org/charts/view/210

http://mapscroll.blogspot.com/2009/04/is-us-becoming-third-world-co...

Reply Score: 2

RE: Does this really need answering?
by fran on Fri 29th Jul 2011 13:17 UTC in reply to "Does this really need answering?"
fran Member since:
2010-08-06

"Because Americans have a lot of money to spend on luxuries. I would've thought that was obvious."

You mean they have a lot of credit to spend on luxuries.

Reply Score: 13

Alfman Member since:
2011-01-28

cmchittom,

"Because Americans have a lot of money to spend on luxuries. I would've thought that was obvious."

Speak for yourself. I'd like to move away to afford a better lifestyle with more opportunity, that's difficult with family ties and all.

Reply Score: 2

vitae Member since:
2006-02-20

Yep, you said it. I hear the Texas is the place to go for jobs and actually affordable living as opposed to here in California where you almost have to be a celebrity, own a vineyard or be in the state legislature to afford it.

Reply Score: 2

RE: Does this really need answering?
by _txf_ on Fri 29th Jul 2011 13:55 UTC in reply to "Does this really need answering?"
_txf_ Member since:
2008-03-17

Because Americans have a lot of money to spend on luxuries. I would've thought that was obvious.


I'd bet that because of the likes of the RIAA the margins on the service are razor thin (not even Apple has large margins in the iTunes store). Having to license/pay Royalties patents further limits profits thus reducing incentives.

Edited 2011-07-29 13:56 UTC

Reply Score: 2

cmchittom Member since:
2011-03-18

Sure. And I bet you're right. But 0.0001% of a kazillion dollars is still a lot of money.

Reply Score: 1

danieldk Member since:
2005-11-18

Actually, no. In Jun 15 billion tracks were sold on iTunes. If we are optimistic, and set the track price to $1 (which is not correct, because a lot of people buy albums)

$15,000,000,000 * 0.0001 = $1,500,000

Or 1.5 million dollars. Which is a lot of money for you or me, but not one of the largest, or even largest music retailer.

So, let's hope for Apple they do a bit better ;) .

OTOH, iTunes was meant to tie people into the iPod and later iPhone ecosystem anyway...

Edited 2011-07-29 14:45 UTC

Reply Score: 4

cmchittom Member since:
2011-03-18

I yield in the face of your data, sir/ma'am (delete as appropriate).

Reply Score: 1

jack_perry Member since:
2005-07-06

Actually, no. In Jun 15 billion tracks were sold on iTunes. If we are optimistic, and set the track price to $1 (which is not correct, because a lot of people buy albums)

$15,000,000,000 * 0.0001 = $1,500,000


Believe it or not, your math's wrong. He originally wrote .0001%, so you should have shifted the decimal and computed

$15,000,000,000 * .00001 = $15,000.

Amusingly, even though your math's wrong, that actually strengthens your overall argument.

On the other hand, the point of the iTunes store is not to make money selling songs, but to make money selling iProducts, where the profit margins are substantially higher. As you write later:

OTOH, iTunes was meant to tie people into the iPod and later iPhone ecosystem anyway...

Reply Score: 6

danieldk Member since:
2005-11-18

Until China says "no more debt".

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:USDebt.png

Reply Score: 2

Unalienable Rights
by fretinator on Fri 29th Jul 2011 13:33 UTC
fretinator
Member since:
2005-07-06

Life, Litigation and the Pursuit of Holdings

Reply Score: 8

Comment by Laurence
by Laurence on Fri 29th Jul 2011 13:49 UTC
Laurence
Member since:
2007-03-26

According the the BBC, it's two or more patents:

The lawsuit claims that Spotify has violated at least two patents owned by PacketVideo that cover methods of streaming music over data networks.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-14338710

Either way, it's still BS.

Reply Score: 4

...and the lesson is...
by Chris_c on Fri 29th Jul 2011 15:30 UTC
Chris_c
Member since:
2011-07-29

don't do business in the US, sell your software / hardware in countries with a free market...

Reply Score: 3

RE: ...and the lesson is...
by cmchittom on Fri 29th Jul 2011 16:42 UTC in reply to "...and the lesson is..."
cmchittom Member since:
2011-03-18

For the sake of argument, such as? And whyso?

Edited 2011-07-29 16:44 UTC

Reply Score: 0

Hard to read
by ephracis on Fri 29th Jul 2011 16:35 UTC
ephracis
Member since:
2007-09-23

I don't know about you guys but I had a really hard time grasping that legalese stuff. I decided to aid myself in the way I always do when I have problems concentrating on large texts: I applied syntax highlighting.

Forgive me for the rough system but I think that:

Red: devices, objects, networks
Blue: information, data
Green: actors
Bold: no idea, it just felt right

https://docs.google.com/document/d/1TawMo449eXezgF6eB3_tRDXI6-02OGO7...

Edited 2011-07-29 16:54 UTC

Reply Score: 3

RE: Hard to read
by ephracis on Fri 29th Jul 2011 17:01 UTC in reply to "Hard to read"
ephracis Member since:
2007-09-23

Curse this limited edit time!

Red: devices, objects
Purple: networks
Yellow: structures

Edited 2011-07-29 17:02 UTC

Reply Score: 2

RE: Hard to read
by flypig on Fri 29th Jul 2011 20:23 UTC in reply to "Hard to read"
flypig Member since:
2005-07-13

Thanks for this; I actually found it very helpful.

Reply Score: 1

Even if Spotify hadn't entered the US
by flypig on Fri 29th Jul 2011 20:25 UTC
flypig
Member since:
2005-07-13

What's kind of odd is that the patent isn't just valid in the US. As well as the US, it looks like it was also filed as a European patent:

http://tinyurl.com/44ox72s

Given this, it's surprising PacketVideo waited until Spotify entered the US market to file a lawsuit.

[Edit: removed list of countries that was probably wrong]

Edited 2011-07-29 20:30 UTC

Reply Score: 1

anda_skoa Member since:
2005-07-07

Given this, it's surprising PacketVideo waited until Spotify entered the US market to file a lawsuit.


It is more likely that the patent is not enforcable in any European jurisdiction.
The European Patent Office is known to grant patents on things that are outside of patentability as far as European national or union laws are concernced.

Holders of these patents probably speculate that they might become enforcable in the future given enough lobbying.
But right now the only thing they can do is sit back and grind their collective teeth ;)

Reply Score: 2

flypig Member since:
2005-07-13

Well, I guess we'll find out. Looking in to this further, I just noticed they've also filed a lawsuit in Thom's home country too:

http://www.theregister.co.uk/2011/07/29/spotify_sued_by_packetvideo...

The Register seems to suggest they waited because of the size of the US market, which would make sense.

Reply Score: 1

Comment by motang
by motang on Sun 31st Jul 2011 19:12 UTC
motang
Member since:
2008-03-27

Just the us to sue, shame.

Reply Score: 1