Linked by David Adams on Fri 5th Aug 2011 16:35 UTC, submitted by sjvn
PDAs, Cellphones, Wireless Market research analyst firm VisionMobile says Google's Android smartphone operating system isn't very open at all. Google's open-source chief Chris DiBona strongly disagrees.
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Simple as pie
by _xmv on Fri 5th Aug 2011 23:38 UTC
_xmv
Member since:
2008-12-09

Yeah it's simple and I don't need no analyst.

QUESTION:

Is the code for the latest Android that run on thousand of devices available and open?


ANSWER:

NO

Is Android open source then? Well, no. It isn't. There is no need to argue around it, it's a pretty black and white thing.

Reply Score: 6

RE: Simple as pie
by andydread on Sun 7th Aug 2011 18:20 UTC in reply to "Simple as pie"
andydread Member since:
2009-02-02

Code for the the lastest Andriod os is that is distributed with a device is availble from the Device manufacturer. See HTC, ASUS, Motorola et al.

Also can the operating system be forked? The answer is yes. Which is more than I can say for Apple or MS operating systems See Cyanogen.

Reply Score: 1

RE: Simple as pie
by zima on Wed 10th Aug 2011 23:14 UTC in reply to "Simple as pie"
zima Member since:
2005-07-06

Presumably the answer is even easier when the study is apparently sponsored by, at least, a possible future competitor?... http://www.itworld.com/mobile-wireless/191791/pay-no-attention-spon...

Reply Score: 1

Definitions that remove all meaning
by atsureki on Sat 6th Aug 2011 02:35 UTC
atsureki
Member since:
2006-03-12

I got >10million lines of code that says otherwise.


Though his longer response is more realistic, this one is typical of the attitude from the project.

See also:
the definition of open: "mkdir android ; cd android ; repo init -u git://android.git.kernel.org/platform/manifest.git ; repo sync ; make"


Another definition Android doesn't meet, as of Honeycomb.

So they'll gladly soak up all the moral praise that comes with being an "open" project while completely disregarding the qualitative factors that make being "open" a morally praiseworthy position.

All that is to say nothing of the practical advantages of openness. In Android, that consists entirely of custom ROMs, which are no more difficult (and far less often necessary) to attain on popular non-"open" platforms. The added difficulties of fragmentation hit home hackers harder than the average end user. Got an iPhone? Load this web page, and you're jailbroken. Got an Android phone? Which one? Which carrier? Which version? Which hardware revision? Read this long thread about it. Sign up for a forum account, or the links won't work.

Meanwhile, their openness to being used by corporations just leads to things like this: http://arstechnica.com/gadgets/reviews/2010/11/worst-gadget-ever-ar...

Remind me again why anyone wastes breath proclaiming that Android is open.

Reply Score: 4

Icaria Member since:
2010-06-19

That tablet isn't 'official' Android: no Google apps, no app market and the legality of it's branding is dubious, at best (I've handled that tablet, sadly).

Otherwise, spot on.

Reply Score: 1

andydread Member since:
2009-02-02

"I got >10million lines of code that says otherwise.


Though his longer response is more realistic, this one is typical of the attitude from the project.

See also:
the definition of open: "mkdir android ; cd android ; repo init -u git://android.git.kernel.org/platform/manifest.git ; repo sync ; make"


Another definition Android doesn't meet, as of Honeycomb.

So they'll gladly soak up all the moral praise that comes with being an "open" project while completely disregarding the qualitative factors that make being "open" a morally praiseworthy position.

All that is to say nothing of the practical advantages of openness. In Android, that consists entirely of custom ROMs, which are no more difficult (and far less often necessary) to attain on popular non-"open" platforms. The added difficulties of fragmentation hit home hackers harder than the average end user. Got an iPhone? Load this web page, and you're jailbroken. Got an Android phone? Which one? Which carrier? Which version? Which hardware revision? Read this long thread about it. Sign up for a forum account, or the links won't work.

Meanwhile, their openness to being used by corporations just leads to things like this: http://arstechnica.com/gadgets/reviews/2010/11/worst-gadget-ever-ar...

Remind me again why anyone wastes breath proclaiming that Android is open.
"

it also leads to things like this:
http://www.cyanogenmod.com/
and this:
http://www.linuxfordevices.com/c/a/News/WIMM-Labs-WIMM-One-Wearable...

Your claim that Android is not open yet showing and example (albeit a poor one) of its openness is quite frankly...silly.

Reply Score: 1

v It's all about marketing
by ourcomputerbloke on Sat 6th Aug 2011 08:32 UTC
RE: It's all about marketing
by MOS6510 on Sat 6th Aug 2011 14:40 UTC in reply to "It's all about marketing"
MOS6510 Member since:
2011-05-12

I guess iPhone users can pull a longer stretch with their phone, while Android users will be looking for something better after 6 months or so.

A lot of iPhone 3GS users I know don't even think about an iPhone 4 or 5, because the 3GS still works fine.

Reply Score: 1

Silly
by tonym on Sun 7th Aug 2011 04:21 UTC
tonym
Member since:
2005-07-06

People this is silly, let me break it down.

How open is Android's source code? Extremely.
How open is Android's development? Extremely not open.

The debate comes from people talking about different things.

You can't debate that the code is open source.
To cut off the Honeycomb code comments, patience is a virtue.

Reply Score: 1

RE: Silly
by rhavyn on Sun 7th Aug 2011 05:40 UTC in reply to "Silly"
rhavyn Member since:
2005-07-06

To cut off the Honeycomb code comments, patience is a virtue.


Does that mean Doom 3 has been open source for 7 years? Since id normally open sources their games (at some unspecified point in the future when they want to), can we say Rage is open source?

Reply Score: 2

RE[2]: Silly
by mantrik00 on Sun 7th Aug 2011 16:10 UTC in reply to "RE: Silly"
mantrik00 Member since:
2011-07-06

Have patience, its coming with IceCream Sandwich. The rough guideline (date) for that has already been announced by Google with reasoning for not releasing the Honeycomb code as of now. So, it isn't "unspecified" time in the future as you claim.

Reply Score: 1

mantrik00
Member since:
2011-07-06

Of course, Android is open. What the developer/hacking community is interested in is the source code, which the Android Open Source Project dishes out from time to time. What does a marketing firm know?

Reply Score: 1