Linked by Thom Holwerda on Wed 24th Aug 2011 23:05 UTC
Apple Why does news like this always come right before I want to go to bed? Steve Jobs has just announced he is stepping down from the CEO position of Apple. He will be succeeded by Apple's chief operating officer, Tim Cook. Steve Jobs will remain at Apple as chairman of the board and director. This is... Strange.
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Comment by broken_symlink
by broken_symlink on Wed 24th Aug 2011 23:16 UTC
broken_symlink
Member since:
2005-07-06

Now is the time to buy apple stock. It will probably go down, then go up again.

Reply Score: 4

RE: Comment by broken_symlink
by Soulbender on Thu 25th Aug 2011 00:26 UTC in reply to "Comment by broken_symlink"
Soulbender Member since:
2005-08-18

Wouldn't it be better to buy it after it has gone down then?

Reply Score: 7

broken_symlink Member since:
2005-07-06
I guess the world really is ending...
by apoclypse on Wed 24th Aug 2011 23:17 UTC
apoclypse
Member since:
2007-02-17

First an earthquake in Virginia now this. Shit, I'm packing up and moving to Brazil. At least I can die ogling hot young women on sandy beaches.

Reply Score: 8

Calipso Member since:
2007-03-13
tuaris Member since:
2007-08-05

Definitely something going on.

Reply Score: 3

Laurence Member since:
2007-03-26

Definitely something going on.

Yeah and NASA are ones covering it up:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5RayLESEiHs

Reply Score: 3

End of an Era?
by galvanash on Wed 24th Aug 2011 23:23 UTC
galvanash
Member since:
2006-01-25

Regardless of what you think of Apple or Jobs it is impossible to see how anyone could really fill his shoes. Whether you see that as being a good thing or bad depends on the glasses you are looking through I guess - but I'm strictly speaking financially.

The guy really was an enigma - I would really hate to be Mr. Cook at this point. Jobs is leaving Apple in what is by any accounts the best possible financial condition anyone could possible hope for. That isn't even strong enough - considering the size of the company people wise and the small number of products they make, Apple is in better condition than anyone could reasonably hope for...

The situation for Mr. Cook is daunting indeed. I don't see how he could do anything that anyone would consider an improvement financially... Jobs brought Apple from the edge of ruin to the pinnacle of success in a little less than 15 years. How do you follow that act?

Reply Score: 6

RE: End of an Era?
by Thom_Holwerda on Wed 24th Aug 2011 23:26 UTC in reply to "End of an Era?"
Thom_Holwerda Member since:
2005-06-29

My guess is his job is to sustain Apple. I mean, it doesn't seem like this resignation was planned, but more forced on Jobs due to his health. This means that NOT everything is yet in order for Jobs to leave as CEO.

Fascinating times ahead for Apple. Wonder how the stock market takes it tomorrow.

Edited 2011-08-24 23:27 UTC

Reply Score: 2

RE[2]: End of an Era?
by galvanash on Wed 24th Aug 2011 23:35 UTC in reply to "RE: End of an Era?"
galvanash Member since:
2006-01-25

My guess is his job is to sustain Apple.


Yes, I agree. But I'm just looking at it from Cook's point of view. He had a lot to do with the success of Apple - he is generally given credit for setting up Apple's manufacturing juggernaut, but the generally public only sees Jobs.

My point is the best he can possibly hope for is to be seen as a competent chair warmer for the next guy, and that is assuming nothing goes wrong during his tenure. If something does go wrong, he'll be the next John Scully - whether he deserves it or not.

Edited 2011-08-24 23:36 UTC

Reply Score: 4

RE: End of an Era?
by kaiwai on Thu 25th Aug 2011 02:24 UTC in reply to "End of an Era?"
kaiwai Member since:
2005-07-06

Regardless of what you think of Apple or Jobs it is impossible to see how anyone could really fill his shoes. Whether you see that as being a good thing or bad depends on the glasses you are looking through I guess - but I'm strictly speaking financially.

The guy really was an enigma - I would really hate to be Mr. Cook at this point. Jobs is leaving Apple in what is by any accounts the best possible financial condition anyone could possible hope for. That isn't even strong enough - considering the size of the company people wise and the small number of products they make, Apple is in better condition than anyone could reasonably hope for...

The situation for Mr. Cook is daunting indeed. I don't see how he could do anything that anyone would consider an improvement financially... Jobs brought Apple from the edge of ruin to the pinnacle of success in a little less than 15 years. How do you follow that act?


With that being said it was Tim Cook as the financial brains behind it all - Steve Jobs might have had a vision but someone has to be working behind the scenes doing all the drudgery day to day to keep a tight ship going in the right direction. The big question is whether Apple needs the razzle-dazzle of Steve getting on stage or can the products sell themselves? so far it appears that the products are selling themselves as Steve has become less and less a public figure for the company.

Edited 2011-08-25 02:29 UTC

Reply Score: 3

RE: End of an Era?
by Soulbender on Thu 25th Aug 2011 02:36 UTC in reply to "End of an Era?"
Soulbender Member since:
2005-08-18

By not screwing up and ruining it.

Reply Score: 2

Apple has deep bench...
by jackeebleu on Wed 24th Aug 2011 23:24 UTC
jackeebleu
Member since:
2006-01-26

They've lost people that have been listed as "key" before and kept on chugging, Steve is more symbolic than anything in the years since his illness. Apple's future is still very bright.

Reply Score: 2

RE: Apple has deep bench...
by JAlexoid on Thu 25th Aug 2011 00:08 UTC in reply to "Apple has deep bench..."
JAlexoid Member since:
2009-05-19

Question now is how will the market react...

Reply Score: 2

RE: Apple has deep bench...
by Laurence on Thu 25th Aug 2011 08:57 UTC in reply to "Apple has deep bench..."
Laurence Member since:
2007-03-26

They've lost people that have been listed as "key" before and kept on chugging, Steve is more symbolic than anything in the years since his illness. Apple's future is still very bright.


Indeed.

MS survived without Gates (regardless of what you might think of Steven Ballmer); Apple with survive without Jobs.

Life goes on.

Reply Score: 4

RE[2]: Apple has deep bench...
by galvanash on Thu 25th Aug 2011 18:24 UTC in reply to "RE: Apple has deep bench..."
galvanash Member since:
2006-01-25

MS survived without Gates (regardless of what you might think of Steven Ballmer); Apple with survive without Jobs.


So far Ballmer has managed to erase 60% of Microsoft's valuation during his tenure... That might technically be considered "surviving", but it can also be considered "royally f**king up" too. Yes, it is a down economy and all that, but Apple managed to go in the opposite direction in the same environment under Jobs.

Just saying, using Ballmer and Microsoft as an analogy for "things will be fine" is downright ironic if you ask me...

Reply Score: 2

RE[2]: Apple has deep bench...
by TemporalBeing on Thu 25th Aug 2011 22:06 UTC in reply to "RE: Apple has deep bench..."
TemporalBeing Member since:
2007-08-22

"They've lost people that have been listed as "key" before and kept on chugging, Steve is more symbolic than anything in the years since his illness. Apple's future is still very bright.


Indeed.

MS survived without Gates (regardless of what you might think of Steven Ballmer); Apple with survive without Jobs.

Life goes on.
"


Gates turned over stuff to Ballmer long before he actually left. But even so, Microsoft is no where near what it was under Gates and has gone from having zero debt (under Gates) to taking on debt (under Ballmer).

Moreover, Microsoft is loosing a lot of mind share in the world, and will soon be passing into the background where it won't be "Microsoft Windows' and "Microsoft Office" - but computing in general, namely due to the rise of iOS and Android and the revolution of mobile computing that Microsoft always tried to thwart under Gates but has been powerless to stop in recent years - and it's a market that Microsoft has no ability to play in, let alone control - which is why they're really a dieing company now as they depend on that control.

Now comparatively, Apple has never done well in the past when Jobs left. However, under his recent tenure they made sure that the company would do well without him - and have tested it numerous times, both with and without the public knowing - where the public only found out after the fact (the first time that I'm aware of). Apple as a company has a very solid leadership that will be able to weather the loss of Jobs and the market should be able to pick up on that fairly quickly if it hasn't already.

In other words, Apple is going to be around for a long time to come. Microsoft won't be.

Reply Score: 2

Onset Decline
by churlish_Helmut on Wed 24th Aug 2011 23:26 UTC
churlish_Helmut
Member since:
2010-04-12

I've read 2 months ago an article about Apple and why they're are over the zenith in a managers journal.

Well, they are no clairvoyant, but i think, that Steve Jobs resign catalyzes the decline of Apple.

But honestly - the point of time is real good: Apple want to show it muscle; New HQ in Cupterino (I mean this UFO), the possible release of iPhone 4s an 5 as an strategy to gain more shares in China...

But without Jobs... there is no trust in the Future maybe.

Sounds strange? Maybe, but remember the osnews article, that Apple its some kind of religion? Well, Jobs is the Messiah of this Religion. And unlike christianity, the story ends with the Messias passing.


Well... okay, this analogy is pathetic ;)

Reply Score: 3

RE: Onset Decline
by MysterMask on Thu 25th Aug 2011 02:26 UTC in reply to "Onset Decline"
MysterMask Member since:
2005-07-12


Sounds strange? Maybe, but remember the osnews article, that Apple its some kind of religion? Well, Jobs is the Messiah of this Religion. And unlike christianity, the story ends with the Messias passing.


Well... okay, this analogy is pathetic ;)


Yes, it is.

And it's more the (pro- and especially the anti- <this and that>) fanatics on OS news that are religious. Looking at some discussions on OS News, you'll find much more religious communities than Apple.

Reply Score: 3

He needs a rest
by JAlexoid on Wed 24th Aug 2011 23:28 UTC
JAlexoid
Member since:
2009-05-19

As much as I dislike the smugness of Apple, he did bring Apple back out of abyss to become an iconic company again.
It's time for him to rest. He is a man with a serious illness... he shouldn't be working as a CEO.

Reply Score: 4

Anyway you look at it...
by BluenoseJake on Wed 24th Aug 2011 23:48 UTC
BluenoseJake
Member since:
2005-08-11

It's a holy shit moment when you first hear that

Reply Score: 4

Comment by ronaldst
by ronaldst on Wed 24th Aug 2011 23:58 UTC
ronaldst
Member since:
2005-06-29

Deep down, we all knew this day would come. I hope his health isn't in a dire situation. ;)

Reply Score: 5

RE: Comment by ronaldst
by jal_ on Thu 25th Aug 2011 06:54 UTC in reply to "Comment by ronaldst"
jal_ Member since:
2006-11-02

That's not really "deep down", it wasn't an "if" but a "when". The guy had an organ transplant, you can't hope to live (or make 80h weeks) forever with that. I wouldn't be surprised if within a week, we learn that he is terminal.

Reply Score: 2

v Great
by tuma324 on Thu 25th Aug 2011 00:01 UTC
RE: Great
by testman on Thu 25th Aug 2011 00:03 UTC in reply to "Great"
testman Member since:
2007-10-15

One less douche in the industry.

Plenty of other "douches" like yourself to fill the gaps though. :-)

Reply Score: 16

RE[2]: Great
by danger_nakamura on Thu 25th Aug 2011 01:24 UTC in reply to "RE: Great"
danger_nakamura Member since:
2011-06-21

So I guess its only socially acceptable to call someone in good health a douche?

Because a lot of people would agree that, illness aside, talent aside, success aside, the man is - in fact - a bit of a douche.

Reply Score: 4

RE[3]: Great
by testman on Thu 25th Aug 2011 01:44 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Great"
testman Member since:
2007-10-15

So I guess its only socially acceptable to call someone in good health a douche?

I am not sure what it's like in your country, but in mine it is not socially acceptable to call anyone that.

Reply Score: 4

v RE[4]: Great
by 1c3d0g on Thu 25th Aug 2011 05:43 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: Great"
RE[5]: Great
by testman on Thu 25th Aug 2011 06:54 UTC in reply to "RE[4]: Great"
testman Member since:
2007-10-15

Moron. Is that "socially" acceptable to you? How about just you being Apple's little b!tch? Get a life.

Um, how old are you?

Reply Score: 2

RE[6]: Great
by sorpigal on Thu 25th Aug 2011 12:49 UTC in reply to "RE[5]: Great"
sorpigal Member since:
2005-11-02

I'm sorry, but this offends me far more than the above 'douche' comment.

What are you trying to suggest here? Is it "Only people who are young are rude"? I can prove otherwise: Mature, reasonable people make ugly comments with consideration and intent to harm or offend. This happens all the time, just turn on some cable news.

Being "nice" isn't a fundamental sign of maturity, nor is "not being nice" a fundamental indication of immaturity. You are conducting a form of "ageism" - and using hostile rhetorical tactics at *least* as bad as those of the person to whom you replied! By suggesting that his age has any impact whatsoever on the value, or lack there of, of his comments you are appealing to a false authority (age? wisdom? only you can say for sure) and backhandedly suggesting that we should disregard what he says on the grounds of... what? Youth? Do you mean inexperience? Do you mean immaturity? THEN SAY SO!

I've been being driven nuts talking with people like you since I was 12. You don't want to discuss things, you just want to measure penises. Oh, I'm sorry, I mean wrinkles. If your vast age and experience has granted you some wisdom or insight, why don't you use that to form some kind of rational, articulate and reasoned slap-down? I'll cheer from the sidelines as you make the OP look like a fool.

Now, can you tell me, using words and not passive-aggressive attacks, what it is about the post to which you replied that you dislike, wish to refute or to otherwise speak against?

Edited 2011-08-25 12:52 UTC

Reply Score: 2

RE[7]: Great
by Onnozelschaap on Fri 26th Aug 2011 06:09 UTC in reply to "RE[6]: Great"
Onnozelschaap Member since:
2011-06-10

I bow to thee, dear sir. _O_

Reply Score: 1

RE[4]: Great
by pandronic on Thu 25th Aug 2011 06:59 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: Great"
pandronic Member since:
2006-05-18

Well to be fair there's one good reason to call someone a douche ... if he's a f**king douche.

Reply Score: 2

RE[3]: Great
by tuma324 on Thu 25th Aug 2011 04:33 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Great"
tuma324 Member since:
2010-04-09

"So I guess its only socially acceptable to call someone in good health a douche?

I am not sure what it's like in your country, but in mine it is not socially acceptable to call anyone that.
"

It's not also socially acceptable to be a patent troll and trying to kill competitors (Android). I guess people get what they give. Apple and Jobs will never have any of my respect.

Edited 2011-08-25 04:45 UTC

Reply Score: 6

RE[3]: Great
by Morgan on Thu 25th Aug 2011 04:53 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Great"
Morgan Member since:
2005-06-29

And the world is full of them. I fail to see the point in kicking a dying man on the day he's forced to resign due to said dying.

Look, I've started hating the company myself lately, but I doubt Jobs had a lot to do with any of the recent legal battles. He's probably had such a hard time making it in to work every day that such things were least on his mind.

Take it from someone who has survived cancer after being given a week to live: It fucking sucks. There are no words for that kind of pain and utter fear. I'm extremely fortunate to have survived it at an early age. At this point in his life I can only imagine what he might be going through.

Reply Score: 4

RE[4]: Great
by shotsman on Thu 25th Aug 2011 05:14 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: Great"
shotsman Member since:
2005-07-22

You are so right. When I first heard that I had Leukaemia I thought that life was over for me.

It takes a lot just to get out of bed every day and keep on living a normalish life.

The <redacted> who call him a douch must have never been told they have cancer or any other serious disease.

Reply Score: 4

RE[4]: Great
by tuma324 on Thu 25th Aug 2011 05:31 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: Great"
tuma324 Member since:
2010-04-09

And the world is full of them. I fail to see the point in kicking a dying man on the day he's forced to resign due to said dying.

Look, I've started hating the company myself lately, but I doubt Jobs had a lot to do with any of the recent legal battles. He's probably had such a hard time making it in to work every day that such things were least on his mind.

Take it from someone who has survived cancer after being given a week to live: It f--king sucks. There are no words for that kind of pain and utter fear. I'm extremely fortunate to have survived it at an early age. At this point in his life I can only imagine what he might be going through.


I'm sorry to hear that you went through that yourself, and I'm glad you were able to survive.

I apologize for having said that about Steve Jobs. I shouldn't have said that, I retract from what I said. I feel like an idiot, sorry.

Apologies to Steve Jobs and all its people.

Edited 2011-08-25 05:36 UTC

Reply Score: 6

RE[4]: Great
by danger_nakamura on Thu 25th Aug 2011 18:13 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: Great"
danger_nakamura Member since:
2011-06-21

Thanks for sharing your story, and congratulations on your recovery!

To address your point, however, I take a different view. There is always a point at calling a spade a spade. It is a very important point, and human society has suffered heavily from the lack of it.

How much terribleness is "excused" on a spurious basis? What is the effect of that? When a man (or woman) that has gone through life being a bastard (or a bitch), he can be reasonably assured that even if the attendance is light at his funeral, there will be an attendance, and nothing negative will be said. Death makes angels of us all...

How about talent, success, beauty, power... all things that have been used to overlook or justify anti-social behavior. Read (or re-read) Agatha Christie's "Halowe'n Party." In it you will find a villian named Michael that dismisses murder as unimportant so long as it fulfills his desire and need to create beauty. An extreme example, but it happens all the time. Except is is others that usually make the excuses.

Act however you want, as long as you create great products. Oh, he's a genuis, so it balances out the fact that he likes to fling feces at everyone in the room. Oh, he's a powerful man - they have to do things differently from us "little people" so that explains that. Oh, all his teeth are capped pearly white - he must be a really nice man.

I'm rambling, I know it. I don't even think I'm making my point. I guess its this: it serves no benefit to "overlook" or "ignore" bad behavior, personality traits, etc. on a spurious basis. And I include the person's current health status as spurious. Call him what he is - be fair, be objective. But fair cuts both ways - overgenerous is not the same as fair.

I think that society would improve if this were the case. Few people enjoy being thought badly after - and would likely make different decisions in life if there were a genuine threat of being called out.

Reply Score: 1

RE[5]: Great
by Morgan on Fri 26th Aug 2011 06:11 UTC in reply to "RE[4]: Great"
Morgan Member since:
2005-06-29

You seem to be over-dramatizing things. I realize Jobs has a bad reputation regarding his personality. I just think it's extremely bad taste to kick someone when they're down, as was happening in this thread. When a person does such a thing, how is he any less a "douche" than the target of his derision?

Also, no one is overlooking or ignoring Jobs' past bad acts. Some of us simply choose not to use this major negative turn in his life and career -- nothing spurious about it -- as an easy target for even more ridicule and name-calling. Tell me, does that make us bad people in your eyes too? Because you seem to be quite ready to paint everyone with the same brush.

Reply Score: 2

RE[6]: Great
by danger_nakamura on Fri 26th Aug 2011 06:50 UTC in reply to "RE[5]: Great"
danger_nakamura Member since:
2011-06-21

I guess we'll just have to agree to disagree... and that's OK. Taste is just that - subjective as much as anything can be. I don't think you're a bad person for thinking that way.

In case you wish to try and understand where I'm coming from...

I can't speak to the motives of any other commenters, only myself. Part of the point that I was at pains to make is that it is *not* about kicking someone when they are down. Again, you are entitled to view it that way but that is not the intent.

It is this: as a student of history, observer of people and human behavior, and just general all-around person walking around the world, I have come to be of the opinion that honesty and straight talk are of great value. For a trivial example, I would much rather someone tell me that I have a piece of food stuck to my face than have them let me walk around with it like an idiot. I don't agree with the belief that it is better to "spare my feelings" and I sincerely believe that when applied to non-trivial things - that attitude helps make the world worse rather than better.

I have the same opinion of, for example, Steve Jobs now as I did when he was the pinnacle of success. If his name was brought up and someone called him a "douche" I would have concurred then, based on what I have seen of the man. I see no good reason, simply because the man is ill and leaving his job, to let other praise him to the high heavens and sit quietly.

Besides all of this, I certainly am not arrogant enough to believe that my comments will ever reach the man's eyes, let alone have any impact on his mental well being if they did.

And for the record, I see no evidence in my comment that I paint everyone with a broad brush, so I'm not sure where you're getting that from. I certainly don't like to think that I do - and I try very hard not to.

We just disagree on the matter of what good taste is. That's cool, man. No need to get itchy.

Reply Score: 1

RE[7]: Great
by Morgan on Fri 26th Aug 2011 07:12 UTC in reply to "RE[6]: Great"
Morgan Member since:
2005-06-29

You know, I do get you now, and I'll take a page from your playbook:

It is this: as a student of history, observer of people and human behavior, and just general all-around person walking around the world, I have come to be of the opinion that honesty and straight talk are of great value.



You sound like a pompous, self-important know it all asshole.

There, now that we're acting just alike, we can understand each other.

(facepalm)

Reply Score: 2

RE: Great
by UltraZelda64 on Thu 25th Aug 2011 00:53 UTC in reply to "Great"
UltraZelda64 Member since:
2006-12-05

One less douche in the industry.

I have to admit, this post made me laugh. ;)

Reply Score: 1

RE: Great
by jackeebleu on Thu 25th Aug 2011 01:15 UTC in reply to "Great"
jackeebleu Member since:
2006-01-26

Your mother is calling you, don't you hear her? Now get off the computer drinking Mountain Dew and put in your retainer and your ProActiv cleansing mask. Make sure you wash under your man boobs properly, you'll get chaffed.

Reply Score: 0

Comment by whartung
by whartung on Thu 25th Aug 2011 00:24 UTC
whartung
Member since:
2005-07-06

This is timely since they have the marketing announcement thing in, what, 2 weeks? Gives them time to figure stuff out and answers to questions when they do the presentation.

Reply Score: 2

Comment by stabbyjones
by stabbyjones on Thu 25th Aug 2011 00:40 UTC
stabbyjones
Member since:
2008-04-15

Not that this is going to change much, if anything for Apple; I'm actually more surprised he waited this long to do it.

Reply Score: 3

The answer to your first question ...
by JoeBuck on Thu 25th Aug 2011 00:42 UTC
JoeBuck
Member since:
2006-01-11

"Why does news like this always come right before I want to go to bed?"

It's because American companies announce big news that will move the stock price after the American markets have closed, which will be late in the evening for you in the Netherlands.

They are required to do this if possible by the insider trading laws, so those who find out a bit earlier don't have as much of an advantage over those who haven't heard.

Reply Score: 7

v He sees the end comming
by tuaris on Thu 25th Aug 2011 00:51 UTC
RE: He sees the end comming
by sorpigal on Thu 25th Aug 2011 12:54 UTC in reply to "He sees the end comming"
sorpigal Member since:
2005-11-02

Come on, mods, really? -2? This is not off topc and it's not a troll. The opening paragraph was clearly intended as gently humorous and, even were it not, the meat of the message should not be suppressed as a result.

Reply Score: 1

RE[2]: He sees the end comming
by atsureki on Fri 26th Aug 2011 21:05 UTC in reply to "RE: He sees the end comming"
atsureki Member since:
2006-03-12

Come on, mods, really? -2? This is not off topc and it's not a troll.


It was a difficult choice between "inaccurate" and "funny", but such is the way of Poe's Law.

Reply Score: 2

Comment by neticspace
by neticspace on Thu 25th Aug 2011 00:51 UTC
neticspace
Member since:
2009-06-09

Steve Jobs will be the eternal leader of Apple even after his death.

Reply Score: 7

Steve didn't do all the work at Apple
by theosib on Thu 25th Aug 2011 00:57 UTC
theosib
Member since:
2006-03-02

Keep in mind that Steve didn't do all the work at Apple. He just had good taste and enforced it. In order to be able to have this arrangement, policies were created where, for instance, 10 prototypes for every product are created, and he got to pick the one that was best. Apple is the only company in the world to essentially throw away 90% of their R&D, and the result have been good design quality. As long as these policies are maintained, and there is a team of people at the top with some good taste, then Apple will continue to function well. Sadly, it'll be hard to find people with good taste. I can say for sure that although I think I have good taste, I'm not up to Steve's standard. I know what _I_ like, but the key is knowing what OTHER PEOPLE will like. And sometimes I don't know what I'll like until I see it, while I'm sure Steve had plenty of design suggestions to make that I never could have made. In other words, you have to have astoundingly good taste, beyond that of a CS Ph.D.

Reply Score: 5

unclefester Member since:
2007-01-13

Apple is the only company in the world to essentially throw away 90% of their R&D, and the result have been good design quality.


Not true at all. Every pharmaceutical and food processing company throws out vastly more R+D.

Only 1-2% of new breakfast cereals developed ever reaches the market.

Less than 0.01% of potential drugs tested ever reaches the pharmacy shelves.

Reply Score: 9

Darkmage Member since:
2006-10-20

Frankly most CS PHDs have terrible taste. I don't think CS is a prerequisite to making a good apple product. It's more about knowing what you want and not getting distracted by things outside of that. Apple always took the approach of what do I really want? forget about throwing in extra crap, just aim for that simple goal. I don't want every format on my tv set top box/mp3 player, I want an easy to use interface and the ability to load in a media library. Don't care about supporting 50+ billion formats. KISS, Keep It Simple Stupid design philosophy.

Reply Score: 1

I wish him well
by truckweb on Thu 25th Aug 2011 01:02 UTC
truckweb
Member since:
2005-07-06

Jobs and Wozniak were well known before Gates. Apple 1 prototype witch became the Apple II computer. It took IBM to put Microsoft in the spotlight with MS-DOS.

Where was Gates when Steve saw and "copied" Xerox Star GUI for the Lisa and after, the Mac? Gates had to make poor copies with Windows 1,2,386 before getting it "almost right" with Windows 3.1

The iPod was not the first MP3 player on the market, but man, did it change the landscape, and with the iTune Store, everything changed. All the other music player are in a niche market because everybody relate to the iPod when talking about digital music player.

The same is happening with the Tablet. Even at $399, HP was not able to sell WebOS, still, Apple can't manufacture enough iPad, they sell like hotcake even if it cost more. When people think about tablet, most of the time they think about iPad.

Apple has enough money to ride this economic downturn, all thanks to Steve.

Really sorry to hear about this, I wish him well.

Reply Score: 2

RE: I wish him well
by unclefester on Thu 25th Aug 2011 02:22 UTC in reply to "I wish him well"
unclefester Member since:
2007-01-13

Go and learn the history before spouting nonsense like this.

Gates had already achieved legendary status by porting Basic to the Altair.

Steve Wozniak built the Apple I not Steve Jobs.

The courts dismissed the Apple claims against MS regarding the GUI.

Reply Score: 6

RE[2]: I wish him well
by umad on Thu 25th Aug 2011 04:20 UTC in reply to "RE: I wish him well"
umad Member since:
2011-08-18

The courts dismissed the Apple claims against MS regarding the GUI.

Actually no. They didn't. Microsoft kept the matter in court with the hope of bleeding Apple's finances to death at a time when they had none to spare.

Apple settled even though they were in the right so that they can move on without losing any more money.

Reply Score: 1

RE[3]: I wish him well
by unclefester on Thu 25th Aug 2011 05:29 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: I wish him well"
unclefester Member since:
2007-01-13

MS bailed out Apple when they were on the brink of collapse with a $150m stock purchase and ongoing support for Mac software (Word, Internet Explorer). MS could have easily killed Apple at that time.

Reply Score: 1

RE[4]: I wish him well
by Lennie on Thu 25th Aug 2011 09:13 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: I wish him well"
Lennie Member since:
2007-09-22

Which would have made them an even bigger monopoly and in bigger trouble with the regulatory boddies.

I think that might be the only reason they did it, atleast I never knew any other.

Reply Score: 3

RE[4]: I wish him well
by Tony Swash on Thu 25th Aug 2011 10:32 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: I wish him well"
Tony Swash Member since:
2009-08-22

MS bailed out Apple when they were on the brink of collapse with a $150m stock purchase and ongoing support for Mac software (Word, Internet Explorer). MS could have easily killed Apple at that time.


So that's something else Microdope got wrong then ;)

Reply Score: 1

RE[3]: I wish him well
by tomcat on Thu 25th Aug 2011 21:59 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: I wish him well"
tomcat Member since:
2006-01-06

"The courts dismissed the Apple claims against MS regarding the GUI.

Actually no. They didn't. Microsoft kept the matter in court with the hope of bleeding Apple's finances to death at a time when they had none to spare.

Apple settled even though they were in the right so that they can move on without losing any more money.
"

Um, no, that's ridiculous. The court essentially didn't buy Apple's argument that it owned the look and feel.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apple_Computer,_Inc._v._Microsoft_Corp...

Reply Score: 2

RE[2]: I wish him well
by atsureki on Fri 26th Aug 2011 21:07 UTC in reply to "RE: I wish him well"
atsureki Member since:
2006-03-12

Gates had already achieved legendary status by porting Basic to the Altair.


Which we all use to this day.

Seriously, though, Gates's world-changing innovations were not technical in nature; they were legal. He invented the EULA and the broad licensing practices that brought Windows to the top at IBM's expense, by enabling Compaq to make PC-DOS and then OS/2 clones. But what Windows actually is, as a product, is an unauthorized copy of Apple's work, which was an authorized extension of Xerox's work. Apple created world-changing products; Microsoft created world-changing financial arrangements.

Reply Score: 2

RE: I wish him well
by Soulbender on Thu 25th Aug 2011 02:41 UTC in reply to "I wish him well"
Soulbender Member since:
2005-08-18

Gates had to make poor copies with Windows 1,2,386 before getting it "almost right" with Windows 3.1


Funny how much more market share Windows had and still has.

All the other music player are in a niche market because everybody relate to the iPod when talking about digital music player.


This sounds almost exactly like the opposite of the above. Where was Apple when Audio Highway created Listen Up?

Reply Score: 2

Breaking News !!
by mail4asim on Thu 25th Aug 2011 01:08 UTC
mail4asim
Member since:
2005-07-12

This definitely deserves "Breaking News" tag Thom.. C'mon now ;)

Reply Score: 8

Apple is doomed
by RichterKuato on Thu 25th Aug 2011 01:26 UTC
RichterKuato
Member since:
2010-05-14

A good leader is hard to find. This is why their stock is going down as we speak. Their products may not suffer immediately but I don't think it's too early to suggest this will ripple through their future business and will eventually show in their products. Unless, by chance, this new guy just happens to be one of those rare leaders that have a positive effect on the direction of a company.

Reply Score: 3

v Steve spooked by the Touchpad?
by libray on Thu 25th Aug 2011 02:01 UTC
omg
by fran on Thu 25th Aug 2011 02:27 UTC
fran
Member since:
2010-08-06

(Twitter $%#)"OMG! Thomas Edison I mean Steve Jobs retired.

Well maybe they can now put the Minimise, Maximise on Macintosh on the right hand side where it belong just above the scroll bar. Much better ergonomics for 90% of the population.
*With a setting change option for the left handed people

Reply Score: 4

RE: omg
by Icaria on Thu 25th Aug 2011 05:42 UTC in reply to "omg"
Icaria Member since:
2010-06-19

How is that more ergonomic? Most people don't even physically interact with scrollbars any more. Ergonomics means conservation of movement, yes? So consistent left-to-right widget packing makes perfect sense.

Reply Score: 1

RE[2]: omg
by fran on Thu 25th Aug 2011 08:14 UTC in reply to "RE: omg"
fran Member since:
2010-08-06

Just my personal experience.
My job requires me to use multiple browsers and four windows open along side each other with a workflow that must be as efficient as possible. And files opening and closing constantly.
Right hand side minimize and restore down should be on the same side as your mouse hand (right handed). When it's not it means a mouse movement that instead of say 15cm no take 50cm of left to right swipe and back again.
It can go as high as 100cm when i work in a spreadsheet (on a left hand) monitor and browser on the other.
Sounds like nitpicking, but it really makes a difference if your me. It's a power user feature frankly.
Ubuntu and Mac OS can at least give you an option to change the location of that buttons.
Windows does this the sane way.

Edited 2011-08-25 08:19 UTC

Reply Score: 2

RE[3]: omg
by Icaria on Thu 25th Aug 2011 08:24 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: omg"
Icaria Member since:
2010-06-19

Right hand side minimize and restore down should be on the same side as your mouse hand (right handed). When it's not it means a mouse movement that instead of say 15cm no take 50cm of left to right swipe and back again.
I'm going to resist the urge to pull out the ol' facepalm.jpg and give you the benefit of the doubt.

You're not suggesting which side your mouse is on (relative to your keyboard) determines which side of the screen your mouse cursor will be found on, are you? Please tell me that I'm misreading you.

Reply Score: 1

RE[3]: omg
by daveak on Thu 25th Aug 2011 13:43 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: omg"
daveak Member since:
2008-12-29

Seriously 1 metre? A single flick of 1 or 2 cm and my pointer can be across my 4000 pixel wide desktop (dual display).

Reply Score: 1

RE[4]: omg
by fran on Thu 25th Aug 2011 17:06 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: omg"
fran Member since:
2010-08-06

You must have understood me incorrectly i did not mean my hand shift 100cm, the cursor shift that 100cm. My mouse sensitivity is optimised. Increasing it to your level would make the work i do a bit to tricky.
Maybe i should get myself one of that gaming mouses with 1000000 DPI or something ;-)

Reply Score: 2

.
by Icaria on Thu 25th Aug 2011 05:48 UTC
Icaria
Member since:
2010-06-19

Not terribly surprising news but it'll be interesting to see how blown out of proportion this becomes. Jobs no doubt had a major role in the resurgence of Apple but no one person could be solely responsible for the successes of a company that size (and the dire state of Apple pre-Jobs' return tends to be a tad exaggerated).

I do hope this causes the cult of Apple disperses a bit, though.

Reply Score: 2

RE: .
by Soulbender on Thu 25th Aug 2011 06:58 UTC in reply to "."
Soulbender Member since:
2005-08-18

Jobs no doubt had a major role in the resurgence of Apple but no one person could be solely responsible for the successes of a company that size (and the dire state of Apple pre-Jobs' return tends to be a tad exaggerated).


No, but if that's what people think he did it will have a big impact. Don't underestimate the importance of how things appear to be.

Reply Score: 2

RE[2]: .
by No it isnt on Thu 25th Aug 2011 07:29 UTC in reply to "RE: ."
No it isnt Member since:
2005-11-14

True. And especially for a company that's essentially about fashion.

Reply Score: 2

RE[3]: .
by Icaria on Thu 25th Aug 2011 08:25 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: ."
Icaria Member since:
2010-06-19

Oh god, I'd never thought of Apple as a fashion label before but... it works. Scary how apt that observation actually is.

Reply Score: 1

RE: .
by unclefester on Thu 25th Aug 2011 13:07 UTC in reply to "."
unclefester Member since:
2007-01-13

Jobs no doubt had a major role in the resurgence of Apple but no one person could be solely responsible for the successes of a company that size (and the dire state of Apple pre-Jobs' return tends to be a tad exaggerated).


In fact it is quite common for a single CEO to either massively grow [GE - Jack Welch, Berkshire Hathaway - Warren Buffet] or even destroy a corporation [Enron - Kenneth Lay].

Reply Score: 2

RE[2]: .
by Icaria on Thu 25th Aug 2011 13:39 UTC in reply to "RE: ."
Icaria Member since:
2010-06-19

You have not demonstrated the former and I never contended that the latter was false. It is simply absurd to attribute a large company's successes to one person. It takes a lot of talented individuals, good management and a fair amount of luck to create a behemoth like the modern Apple.

Reply Score: 1

RE[3]: .
by unclefester on Thu 25th Aug 2011 14:05 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: ."
unclefester Member since:
2007-01-13

Completely wrong. Virtually every successful corporation is created and sustained by the vision and drive of a single individual. That includes their creation of successors.

All the brilliant and talented people in a company account for absolutely zero if improperly led. Enron was renowned for picking the very best talent available. Their people were brilliant but the senior leadership was defective.

Reply Score: 2

RE[4]: .
by Icaria on Thu 25th Aug 2011 14:14 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: ."
Icaria Member since:
2010-06-19

Again, I never contended that one higher-up couldn't ruin a company. This is a non-argument.

All the brilliant and talented people in a company account for absolutely zero if improperly led.

All the brilliant and talented leadership in a company account for absolutely zero if improperly staffed.

See what I did there?

Reply Score: 1

RE[5]: .
by _txf_ on Thu 25th Aug 2011 16:55 UTC in reply to "RE[4]: ."
_txf_ Member since:
2008-03-17

"All the brilliant and talented people in a company account for absolutely zero if improperly led.

All the brilliant and talented leadership in a company account for absolutely zero if improperly staffed.
"

Surely the latter leads to the former?

i.e. good leadership means good staffing (and recognizing and fostering talent)

Edited 2011-08-25 16:55 UTC

Reply Score: 2

RE[6]: .
by Icaria on Fri 26th Aug 2011 05:04 UTC in reply to "RE[5]: ."
Icaria Member since:
2010-06-19

Talent's a scarce commodity and hiring and micro-management tends to be the responsibility of middle management. Hell, companies like Apple have entire hiring divisions, stocked with lawyers and sweet-talkers to filch talent from other companies.

That said, even if Jobs went around personally hiring his entire staff, that's still pretty limited as to how much of their success you can credit him for. It's also pretty demeaning.

Reply Score: 1

RE[7]: .
by unclefester on Fri 26th Aug 2011 07:45 UTC in reply to "RE[6]: ."
unclefester Member since:
2007-01-13

An effective leader organises the talent to a common purpose. However without that focus their talents are completely wasted.

Generals don't go and fight hand to hand battles themselves. They make sure that their subordinates are properly trained and directed.

Reply Score: 2

RE[4]: .
by arpan on Fri 26th Aug 2011 15:32 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: ."
arpan Member since:
2006-07-30

And a true leader attracts other leaders.

The last time Apple was ousted, the leaders were guys from the outside. This time he has his own people in place, guys that he has personally selected, trained and worked with and who understand his vision. And he will still be around to provide guidance, help pick things to research and invest etc.

Reply Score: 2

End of an era, yes...
by Neolander on Thu 25th Aug 2011 06:53 UTC
Neolander
Member since:
2010-03-08

Well, on one hand I'm sad to see this is happening (it's kind of like living at the time where John Lennon has been murdered), on the other hand I hope that Cook will do what every new executive does once his predecessor's mourning period is over : roll over his predecessor's work to establish his authority.

It usually is a bad thing, but perhaps this also means the end of those stupid legal battles, unlocked iDevice firmwares, haptic feedback on touchscreen devices, or something like that ?

Edited 2011-08-25 06:59 UTC

Reply Score: 3

Comment by M.Onty
by M.Onty on Thu 25th Aug 2011 09:07 UTC
M.Onty
Member since:
2009-10-23

iResign

Reply Score: 11

Tony Swash
Member since:
2009-08-22

I enjoyed this Steve Jobs anecdote from Vic Gundotra at Google

https://plus.google.com/107117483540235115863/posts/gcSStkKxXTw

Reply Score: 2

Neolander Member since:
2010-03-08

Yup, nice story indeed !

Reply Score: 1

Comment by oranger
by oranger on Thu 25th Aug 2011 10:56 UTC
oranger
Member since:
2009-08-30

Holy shit!

Reply Score: 1

3 years too late
by FunkyELF on Thu 25th Aug 2011 13:45 UTC
FunkyELF
Member since:
2006-07-26

I would have been nice to step down on a high note from a company known for its innovation as opposed to a company that in the past couple years decided to lawyer around instead of innovating.

Reply Score: 2

I wish him well, but not sad to see him go
by docbop on Thu 25th Aug 2011 15:06 UTC
docbop
Member since:
2009-11-04

I've been around Apple stuff since the II, first mouse I touched was on a Apple Lisa, and worked for companies that made Mac dev tools and worked close with Apple. So I heard the dark side of Steve Jobs stories from the orignal Mac developers and other around Apple. Also Jobs are alway into closed systems and high huge margin for Apple products. Next died because Jobs tried to make developing software for it an club that he controlled the members of and he still does it with current App store. Job might of had a "1984" ad to introduce the Mac, but he's been slowing creating a lock-in for Apple fans over the years. When the Apple cloud goes live it will he will be near complete. Software, music, movies, books, your data, and everything in Apples cloud. He creating a modern version of the mainframe. You'll have your iPhone or iPad terminal and all your data and app will be in his mainframe cloud. No thanks.

Too bad they don't make Woz the new CEO instead of a Job's clone.

Reply Score: 1

Neolander Member since:
2010-03-08

He would be a little old for that, wouldn't he ?

Reply Score: 1

MOS6510 Member since:
2011-05-12

Some people are even older and rule entire countries!

Reply Score: 2

Neolander Member since:
2010-03-08

But you change them every 5 to 7 years, and the organization of countries is made so that it is a relatively seamless switch ;)

In companies, CEOs are supposed to be benevolent dictators which stay until they are forced to retire for a reason or the other. And the pyramidal structure is so that when a CEO change occurs, the mess is transmitted throughout the whole hierarchy...

Think about the mess of URSS leader switches !

Edited 2011-08-25 17:13 UTC

Reply Score: 1

MOS6510 Member since:
2011-05-12

My uncle Fidel pas pretty old when he resigned and his term was way beyond 5-7 years.

Reply Score: 2

Neolander Member since:
2010-03-08

Yeah, that's indeed another example of benevolent dictator, to add next to the URSS ;)

Reply Score: 1

arpan Member since:
2006-07-30

Fidel, a benevolent dictator! Huh, never heard him described that way before!

Reply Score: 2

Neolander Member since:
2010-03-08

Dictators only wish the well-being of their populations... that's why they get rid of the subversive elements bringing hate and sadness in their country ;)

That, or I use this "benevolent" adjective too much. Could well be...

Edited 2011-08-26 15:50 UTC

Reply Score: 1

So
by turrini on Thu 25th Aug 2011 18:16 UTC
turrini
Member since:
2006-10-31

Jobs is leaving his job.

Kinda interesting.

Reply Score: 1

Apple stock down a whopping 1%
by Tony Swash on Thu 25th Aug 2011 18:35 UTC
Tony Swash
Member since:
2009-08-22

Apple stock down a whopping 1%

I guess confidence in Apple has collapsed ;)

Reply Score: 2

Does this shock anyone?
by Luposian on Thu 25th Aug 2011 20:09 UTC
Luposian
Member since:
2005-07-27

http://www.sodahead.com/united-states/steve-jobs-replacement-is-gay...

I, personally, had no idea... but now that I know... what to do now?

My own $0.02.

Reply Score: 1

RE: Does this shock anyone?
by Thom_Holwerda on Thu 25th Aug 2011 20:51 UTC in reply to "Does this shock anyone?"
Thom_Holwerda Member since:
2005-06-29

So he's gay?

Sorry, I'm too Dutch to give a shit about crap like this.

Reply Score: 1

RE[2]: Does this shock anyone?
by Neolander on Thu 25th Aug 2011 21:57 UTC in reply to "RE: Does this shock anyone?"
Neolander Member since:
2010-03-08

Too French to give a shit on my side.

Guess that must be something like European culture...

(Well, if we take Poland outside of Europe, that is)

Reply Score: 1

RE[3]: Does this shock anyone?
by Morgan on Fri 26th Aug 2011 06:14 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Does this shock anyone?"
Morgan Member since:
2005-06-29

Too human to care here. It's so much a non-issue, why are we even commenting on it? Sheesh.

Reply Score: 2

RE: Does this shock anyone?
by sakeniwefu on Fri 26th Aug 2011 02:47 UTC in reply to "Does this shock anyone?"
sakeniwefu Member since:
2008-02-26

Bah, but can he tell a fuchsia iPad from a pink one? I thought Steve would be replaced by http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mom_%28Futurama%29" instead.

EDIT: I always forget html hyperlinks only work on preview.

Edited 2011-08-26 02:48 UTC

Reply Score: 2

RE: Does this shock anyone?
by dtravis7 on Fri 26th Aug 2011 08:34 UTC in reply to "Does this shock anyone?"
dtravis7 Member since:
2005-07-14

Then Sell all your Macs. Oh wait, you already did! Make your wife sell hers then and go hide under your bed! ;)

Reply Score: 1

RE: Does this shock anyone?
by v_bobok on Fri 26th Aug 2011 21:27 UTC in reply to "Does this shock anyone?"
v_bobok Member since:
2008-08-01

Maybe the rainbow logo will come back then? ;)

Reply Score: 1

RE[2]: Does this shock anyone?
by dtravis7 on Fri 26th Aug 2011 23:53 UTC in reply to "RE: Does this shock anyone?"
dtravis7 Member since:
2005-07-14

YES! Bring back that Rainbow Apple Logo for sure! ;) Grin

Reply Score: 1

RE[2]: Does this shock anyone?
by filosofem on Sat 27th Aug 2011 09:01 UTC in reply to "RE: Does this shock anyone?"
filosofem Member since:
2010-05-05

Hmmm, if Apple did bring back the rainbow logo along with Tim Cook coming out publicly, they would basically have the LGBT market. On the other hand, if HTC changed their name to THC and name their products White Widow or something, they would basically have the stoner market... Wait, what did I just reveal? :p

Reply Score: 1

Kudos to a great visionary.
by dsmogor on Thu 25th Aug 2011 21:28 UTC
dsmogor
Member since:
2005-09-01

Well, given Jobs obsession on controlling everything in his company that probably means his condition is trully serious.
I hope Apple latest stunts are not a sign of what the way the company will go under new CEO.

When they released IPad I thought: the biggest apple flop has just arrived. I was sooo wrong. That prompted me to presume he must have had the perception of the consumers needs way over us, grey IT industry dwellers.

Edited 2011-08-25 21:40 UTC

Reply Score: 2