Linked by Howard Fosdick on Mon 12th Sep 2011 22:41 UTC
Humor I usually write about topics like operating systems and computer refurbishing. Today let's ditch that trivial stuff and tackle something really important like... How have computers and operating systems been portrayed on TV and in films? It's time we seek our inner geek. With this hearty sign of approval we're on our way...
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v Wikipedia
by ParadoxUncreated on Mon 12th Sep 2011 23:14 UTC
RE: Wikipedia
by Soulbender on Tue 13th Sep 2011 01:36 UTC in reply to "Wikipedia"
Soulbender Member since:
2005-08-18

Uh,fascinating...and this relates to the topic at hand exactly how?

Edited 2011-09-13 01:37 UTC

Reply Score: 4

RE: Wikipedia
by jal_ on Tue 13th Sep 2011 08:40 UTC in reply to "Wikipedia"
jal_ Member since:
2006-11-02

The information I was interested in, was religious.


Religious trolls, who would've thought. Stick to conservæpedia, and be done with it. Wikipedia will melt your brain. It contains evil things like "evolution" (the macro variety!) and claims the age is over 6000 years old!

Reply Score: 4

RE[2]: Wikipedia
by looncraz on Tue 13th Sep 2011 08:51 UTC in reply to "RE: Wikipedia"
looncraz Member since:
2005-07-24

LOL!! Come on!! We ALL know the earth is only 6,000 years old!! Just follow the genealogy in the bible!!

And we know the bible is true! It says so right in the bible!!

Checkmate, atheists!!

Ahem...

The article put me in a funny mood ;-)

--The loon

Reply Score: 4

RE[3]: Wikipedia
by righard on Tue 13th Sep 2011 13:49 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Wikipedia"
righard Member since:
2007-12-26

Very off-topic:

Though I do see this circular fallacy in science too. We have this dogma called logic (the foundation of science), which is a hard fact, because...it's logical.

Reply Score: 0

RE[4]: Wikipedia
by zima on Tue 13th Sep 2011 16:01 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: Wikipedia"
zima Member since:
2005-07-06

...and we verify (or, more accurately, we try to falsify) logical, etc. conclusions against an actual Real World(tm).

Edited 2011-09-13 16:02 UTC

Reply Score: 2

RE[3]: Wikipedia
by rcsteiner on Tue 13th Sep 2011 20:51 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Wikipedia"
rcsteiner Member since:
2005-07-12

There are many more groups on the planet than "Fundamentalist Christians" and "athiests", of course... :-)

Reply Score: 2

RE[4]: Wikipedia
by ParadoxUncreated on Sat 17th Sep 2011 11:35 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: Wikipedia"
ParadoxUncreated Member since:
2009-12-05

Yep. That some people blindly attack a strawman like this.. I think we see people of similar cunning on the internet all the time.

My information is all about the mind, and that how it is divine.

This information is though often replaced with commonly accepted misunderstandings in religion, on wikipedia though.

Or even worse, completely fabricated trash like this:

from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jabir_ibn_Abd-Allah

"Both of the bodies were said to be fresh and intact while their open eyes were said to issue forth such divine light that the spectators' eyes were dazzled"

Edited 2011-09-17 11:38 UTC

Reply Score: 1

RE[3]: Comment by Brynet
by zima on Mon 19th Sep 2011 23:19 UTC in reply to "RE[4]: Wikipedia"
zima Member since:
2005-07-06

Commonly accepted "misunderstandings" of any given time is the true face of religions; it's what makes them, what forms their actual dynamics, what drives religions as popular social movements.

Their true living versions are the frakked up versions; not the niche forms which stem from elevating the confirmation bias to art form by some statistically insignificant self-absorbed & presuming, self-styled thinkers, adepts of mental masturbation. The latter are a background noise without much of any significance (well, occasionally what one random one utters - in the sea of others - might stick, one way or another, in very evolved form, via societal dynamics beyond his real control or even grasp)

And the more we learn about our bodies - the more we study them and one of their manifestations, the mind - the more we realize how the differences with "lower" ones are quantitative. Even most of something so "obvious" to us as free will appears (from research) to be post-hoc rationalization rather than actual free will; a modus operandi which had an especially strong grip on us when most of the present core mythologies were being formed.

Reply Score: 2

RE[4]: Wikipedia
by zima on Mon 19th Sep 2011 23:37 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: Wikipedia"
zima Member since:
2005-07-06

There are many more groups on the planet than "Fundamentalist Christians" and "athiests", of course... :-)

But yet we would have many, many more if not for "Christians", among few, of course... :p (almost starting with Gnostics - unfortunately for them, following the true deity and uncovering the real nature of the mainstream Christian one as an usurper, the Demiurge, is a dangerous thing to do ;p )

Edited 2011-09-19 23:47 UTC

Reply Score: 2

on utube
by SilConGeeky on Mon 12th Sep 2011 23:14 UTC
SilConGeeky
Member since:
2011-08-01

Plenty of LCARS apps on Youtube...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cXqMKLOk1qo&feature=related

I would say, If MS wants to kick some Ipad ass,
they might consider LCARS interface + voice response for their tablets.

Reply Score: 1

RE: on utube
by zima on Tue 13th Sep 2011 16:13 UTC in reply to "on utube"
zima Member since:
2005-07-06

Metro UI is already quite similar to LCARS - very textual, with large uniform areas of colour on a mostly black background, scrolling around. Not quite the same... but remember, LCARS is mostly a film prop meant to look good, be impressive for the audiences, that's its role.

It's kinda similar with voice communication. It's a tool of cinematography, a way for actors to... act. Seeing somebody just silently typing or clicking or swiping in the background would quickly get old.
(plus, the curious thing with voice communication in scifi is that the computers, typically, are able to almost always understand complex meanings of often vague commands, and do virtually everything by themselves / via automated systems ...so what the crews are really for? ;p )
Likewise with scifi video conferencing - primarily, a way to act, to depict the story in a way conductive to mass-consumed video medium. Same with whole depicted technology / physics / world, really.

Edited 2011-09-13 16:30 UTC

Reply Score: 3

Starring The Computer
by Doc Pain on Tue 13th Sep 2011 00:48 UTC
Doc Pain
Member since:
2006-10-08

There's an interesting list of computers shown in movies.

http://starringthecomputer.com/

A famous example is the SAGE (AN/FSQ-7), after it finished its service in the US Air Force. It visits Columbo, Time Tunnel, Battlestar Galactica and other known and unknown TV series or movies.

Also note: The more advanced a computer is, the slower its output appears; also applies to LCARS. :-)

Reply Score: 3

RE: Starring The Computer
by Laurence on Tue 13th Sep 2011 08:35 UTC in reply to "Starring The Computer"
Laurence Member since:
2007-03-26


Also note: The more advanced a computer is, the slower its output appears; also applies to LCARS. :-)

That happens in real life too. (eg Win2000 -> XP -> Vista)

Reply Score: 3

jabbotts Member since:
2007-09-06


That happens in real life too. (eg Win2000 -> XP -> Vista)


He said *advanced* computers.

(joke alert.. couldn't resist today)

Reply Score: 3

My favourite "OS in a movie" bit
by obsidian on Tue 13th Sep 2011 01:34 UTC
obsidian
Member since:
2007-05-12

My favourite computer-related scene in a movie would be the scene in "Wayne's World" where Garth meets a fairly geeky-looking woman holding a large book, and he says (awestruck) -
"Whoooa - a **UNIX** manual!"

Reply Score: 3

UNIX in Jurassic Park
by RavinRay on Tue 13th Sep 2011 02:33 UTC
RavinRay
Member since:
2005-11-26

In that dino-movie, when John Hammond's grandkids were trying to the park's system online, the girl was at a console and she said "It's a UNIX workstation. I know this", then the point-of-view shifted the monitor with a 3D virtualization of the park buildings as she navigated her way to activate the security. I don't think it helped push familiarity with UNIX to the audience in general though.

Reply Score: 2

RE: UNIX in Jurassic Park
by sankazim on Tue 13th Sep 2011 12:27 UTC in reply to "UNIX in Jurassic Park"
sankazim Member since:
2008-11-11

That was a cool scene, http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dFUlAQZB9Ng&feature=related, showing SGI File System Navigator experiment.

Reply Score: 2

RE[2]: UNIX in Jurassic Park
by foregam on Wed 14th Sep 2011 19:51 UTC in reply to "RE: UNIX in Jurassic Park"
foregam Member since:
2010-11-17

Looks like SGI still has fans in the industry. In a Korean series called "Iris" the bad guys use Irix and the good guys something OS/2-ey (or DOSey):
http://i51.tinypic.com/20r3bkx.png
http://i53.tinypic.com/ic2z9v.png
http://i56.tinypic.com/1zcprwn.png
http://i52.tinypic.com/2arqt2.png
http://i53.tinypic.com/21kgqi0.png

Notice the vaguely Uplinky interface of the first computer and the "Comanche" directory on the second, full of appropriately named files like MISSION.DTA. My guess is someone was playing "Comanche: Over the Edge" in the coffee break ;)

Edited 2011-09-14 19:52 UTC

Reply Score: 1

RE: UNIX in Jurassic Park
by bert64 on Tue 13th Sep 2011 12:37 UTC in reply to "UNIX in Jurassic Park"
bert64 Member since:
2007-04-23

That program was called FSN, and ran on irix... You can actually download a copy if you have an old sgi box to run it on.

Reply Score: 2

RE[2]: UNIX in Jurassic Park
by sankazim on Tue 13th Sep 2011 12:56 UTC in reply to "RE: UNIX in Jurassic Park"
sankazim Member since:
2008-11-11

Yes, just the pure binary. When few years ago I've got my hands on a SGI Infinite Reality 2, I had not the occasion to try it.

Reply Score: 1

RE[3]: UNIX in Jurassic Park
by tidux on Tue 13th Sep 2011 15:53 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: UNIX in Jurassic Park"
tidux Member since:
2011-08-13

Somebody did a Linux version of it, with an ancient version of OpenGL and Gtk 1.x.

Reply Score: 1

RE: UNIX in Jurassic Park
by zima on Tue 13th Sep 2011 15:59 UTC in reply to "UNIX in Jurassic Park"
zima Member since:
2005-07-06

It wasn't really a visualisation of buildings; just a 3D view of folders and files hierarchy (only somewhat analogous to physical layouts of the park)

One can download a free software clone of fsn, running on pretty much any *nix ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File_System_Visualizer ), one which seems (hardly anybody can directly compare it with fsn) more polished and somewhat useful - say, when trying to quickly get the idea about sizes of directories (not like 2D graphs aren't probably more practical also in this case)

Reply Score: 3

RE[2]: UNIX in Jurassic Park
by SustainedHavoc on Thu 15th Sep 2011 19:10 UTC in reply to "RE: UNIX in Jurassic Park"
SustainedHavoc Member since:
2011-09-15

Not the focus of the movie(this requires ignoring a BJ from Demi Moore) was the VR file system in 'Disclosure'. Pretty cool for the mid '90's.

Reply Score: 1

Comment by neticspace
by neticspace on Tue 13th Sep 2011 03:42 UTC
neticspace
Member since:
2009-06-09

This reminds me of David Adams' What We Can Learn From MovieOS article.

Reply Score: 2

The Definitive Guide
by atsureki on Tue 13th Sep 2011 03:57 UTC
atsureki
Member since:
2006-03-12

http://www.cracked.com/article_19160_8-scenes-that-prove-hollywood-...

All the most important computing scenes, ever.

Reply Score: 2

RE: The Definitive Guide
by burnttoys on Tue 13th Sep 2011 06:32 UTC in reply to "The Definitive Guide"
burnttoys Member since:
2008-12-20

That's a fun read! Thanks!

It misses a couple of my favs moments. "War Games" was actually pretty good until computers started exploding! It also has the classic quote "Goddammit, I'd piss on a spark plug if I thought it'd do any good!"

Hackers is/was dreadful - I say that as someone who was in it! Still, fun party for 3 days.

Terminator 3's "There's enough C4 to take out 10 supercomputers!" still has me stumped to this day!

Reply Score: 1

RE[2]: The Definitive Guide
by jal_ on Tue 13th Sep 2011 08:47 UTC in reply to "RE: The Definitive Guide"
jal_ Member since:
2006-11-02

Hackers is/was dreadful


Hackers has Angelina Jolie (naked!), and the P6 (with PCI)! 'nough said.

Reply Score: 4

RE[3]: The Definitive Guide
by fretinator on Tue 13th Sep 2011 14:09 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: The Definitive Guide"
fretinator Member since:
2005-07-06

and a laptop with 4 million bytes of ram!!

Reply Score: 2

RE[3]: The Definitive Guide
by Soulbender on Tue 13th Sep 2011 14:29 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: The Definitive Guide"
Soulbender Member since:
2005-08-18

Angelina == good
K6 == good
Hackers, the movie == not so much

Edited 2011-09-13 14:29 UTC

Reply Score: 2

RE[4]: The Definitive Guide
by jal_ on Tue 13th Sep 2011 15:13 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: The Definitive Guide"
jal_ Member since:
2006-11-02

Hackers, the movie == not so much


Haha, well, tastes differ, I remember enjoying it despite its obvious stupidity. Cult ftw!

Reply Score: 2

RE[5]: The Definitive Guide
by Soulbender on Tue 13th Sep 2011 15:51 UTC in reply to "RE[4]: The Definitive Guide"
Soulbender Member since:
2005-08-18

True and at least it wasn't as mind-bogglingly bad as Antri-trust/Conspiracy.com. Holy mother of god was that ever bad.

Reply Score: 3

RE[2]: The Definitive Guide
by Doc Pain on Tue 13th Sep 2011 09:25 UTC in reply to "RE: The Definitive Guide"
Doc Pain Member since:
2006-10-08

It misses a couple of my favs moments. "War Games" was actually pretty good until computers started exploding! It also has the classic quote "Goddammit, I'd piss on a spark plug if I thought it'd do any good!"


I would have assumed everyone's favourite statement of that movie would be: "Gentlemen, I wouldn't trust this overgrown pile of microchips any further than I can throw it." (General Beringer). This wisdom should be applied to modern computers more often. :-)

Reply Score: 2

RE: The Definitive Guide
by Ultimatebadass on Tue 13th Sep 2011 10:39 UTC in reply to "The Definitive Guide"
Ultimatebadass Member since:
2006-01-08

Wow, that was awesome. I pity the guys who had to animate that pointless IRC-boat 3d holographic whatever, i bet they were facepalming all around...

The movies/tv shows from the 80-90s I could understand. It was all still -relatively- new and exciting back then to most people. But this CSI or NCIS? Are they trying to insult the viewer or what?

Reply Score: 3

RE: The Definitive Guide
by Soulbender on Tue 13th Sep 2011 14:36 UTC in reply to "The Definitive Guide"
Soulbender Member since:
2005-08-18

"Detective, I'm 30-years old, I live with my mother and I have a Captain Kirk costume in my closet."

At least they got something right.

Reply Score: 2

Holly
by Gone fishing on Tue 13th Sep 2011 04:07 UTC
Gone fishing
Member since:
2006-02-22

Does Holly from Red Dwarf qualify as an OS?

He / She also has a command-line interface.

Reply Score: 2

RE: Holly
by burnttoys on Tue 13th Sep 2011 06:35 UTC in reply to "Holly"
burnttoys Member since:
2008-12-20

Holly is a genius!

See... http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q_OCa8wSg8g

Orac must win the award for best spoken supercomputer yet sharp supercomputer ever.

Reply Score: 1

I hate fake mock up operating systems
by Mr. Dee on Tue 13th Sep 2011 04:27 UTC
Mr. Dee
Member since:
2005-11-13

CSI is a major offender when it comes to fake operating systems.

Reply Score: 2

jal_ Member since:
2006-11-02

Yeah, you'd think it's easier to make a mock-up using an existing OS, but no...

Reply Score: 2

kahen Member since:
2009-09-07

There is that rumor floating around that writers of CSI and similar shows are in a pissing contest about who can sneak the most ridiculous technobabble bullshit into their respective shows.

So far I think CSI is winning with "GUI interface using Visual Basic" [1] and "corneal imaging" [2].

[1]: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hkDD03yeLnU
[2]: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3uoM5kfZIQ0

Reply Score: 2

Doc Pain Member since:
2006-10-08

There is that rumor floating around that writers of CSI and similar shows are in a pissing contest about who can sneak the most ridiculous technobabble bullshit into their respective shows.


Don't be so rude. What you disrespectfully call "most ridiculous technobabble bullshit" is common terminology in modern IT marketing! :-)

So far I think CSI is winning with "GUI interface using Visual Basic" [1] and "corneal imaging" [2].


Yeah, sure. I'm going to create a blackwhite IP offer of 192.168.2 now in order to commit an RFC based hyperbolic transport location for Shloynts & Froymbrowner ambulance interprocess access level telemetry... hey, I can do this all day, maybe I should write scripts for CSI: Stasi or CSI: Wanne-Eickel. :-)

Reply Score: 2

Carewolf Member since:
2005-09-08

CSI is a major offender to when it comes to everything sciency. The real tragic is that so many take the it serious when it is really a rather unrealistic sci-fi show with fantasy elements springled in for good measure.

Reply Score: 3

SilConGeeky Member since:
2011-08-01

"Independence Day" Apple Laptop hacking into an advanced Alien "mainframe"
... oh yea... thats believable...

The Apple TV commercial ... Apple Saves the world

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HV2CFBAWD_U

Edited 2011-09-13 16:07 UTC

Reply Score: 1

Weird Science...
by burnttoys on Tue 13th Sep 2011 06:42 UTC
burnttoys
Member since:
2008-12-20

Has everything - gibberish technology, pointless plot A MTX512!!! and Kelly LeBrook who introduced a lot of people to puberty.

But basically... utter nonsense.

Reply Score: 1

The Net
by bolomkxxviii on Tue 13th Sep 2011 10:57 UTC
bolomkxxviii
Member since:
2006-05-19

How can you miss the movie "The Net" (1995) with Sandra Bullock as a software engineer? One click and you have total control of the internet!!!

I still have never met a software engineer that looks like that.

Reply Score: 3

RE: The Net
by rcsteiner on Tue 13th Sep 2011 20:58 UTC in reply to "The Net"
rcsteiner Member since:
2005-07-12

I still have never met a software engineer that looks like that.

You need to find a better place of employment, dude. Believe me, they're out there. :-)

Reply Score: 1

Um... what about the 80s?
by djrikki on Tue 13th Sep 2011 11:01 UTC
djrikki
Member since:
2011-09-02

Man Lost in Space sucked bad, how could anyone watch this crap, a cheap Star Trek if you ask me - the acting was unbearable.

Anyway why all the focus on the 1960s? The 80s had some truly memorable computer geek films and I am sure you and most of your readers will recall that decade with much fondness.

Perhaps you could do a part two? ;)

Here are a few 80s computer geeky films I can recall from memory in order of geekyness.

Electric Dreams
War Games
The Last Starfighter
Tron
Short Circuit

Quality watches all of them.

Reply Score: 2

RE: Um... what about the 80s?
by JLF65 on Wed 14th Sep 2011 16:27 UTC in reply to "Um... what about the 80s?"
JLF65 Member since:
2005-07-06

LiS was out a year before Star Trek. CBS passed on ST because they had LiS, it wound up at NBC. Anywho, the first three seasons of LiS had a high budget, but when rating dropped, so did the budget, which led to the show being canceled.

Sure, it got a bit campy, but so did everything in that era - including Batman and Star Trek. Come on! The Enterprise fought a giant amoeba! ;)

Reply Score: 2

Talking to a computer
by sankazim on Tue 13th Sep 2011 12:30 UTC
sankazim
Member since:
2008-11-11

Why not mentioning this scene from Star Trek in which Scott was trying to talk an old computer: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R5e1vfaST2I

Reply Score: 2

LCARS
by 3rdalbum on Tue 13th Sep 2011 13:04 UTC
3rdalbum
Member since:
2008-05-26

There was actually an LCARS theme for Enlightenment E16, that was pretty cool. Back in 2006 it was definitely the best theme I'd ever seen.

Reply Score: 2

Comment by OSbunny
by OSbunny on Tue 13th Sep 2011 13:40 UTC
OSbunny
Member since:
2009-05-23

This article isn't complete without Battlestar Galactica. Among other things BSG made us wonder whether or not Artificial Intelligence can lead to a new life form and how us organic beings will deal with that. The remade series had such an impact that if you type about:robots in your firefox address bar you get to see a reference to that show.

Reply Score: 2

RE: Comment by OSbunny
by Doc Pain on Wed 14th Sep 2011 07:20 UTC in reply to "Comment by OSbunny"
Doc Pain Member since:
2006-10-08

This article isn't complete without Battlestar Galactica. Among other things BSG made us wonder whether or not Artificial Intelligence can lead to a new life form and how us organic beings will deal with that.


In this regards, also see "Colossus: The Forbin Experiment" and "Demon Seed".

Reply Score: 2

csi pc scenes
by fran on Tue 13th Sep 2011 13:44 UTC
fran
Member since:
2010-08-06

The PC scenes in the CSI tv series is so unrealistic it almost spoils it for me.

Reply Score: 2

you gotta do a Part 2
by kateline on Tue 13th Sep 2011 18:18 UTC
kateline
Member since:
2011-05-19

You gotta do a Part 2. This time include Tron, Battlestar Galactica, The Last Starfighter and the Whopper from War Games. You're missin all the best stuff!

Reply Score: 1

HHGTTG
by lighans on Tue 13th Sep 2011 19:15 UTC
lighans
Member since:
2006-01-14

well, I think it was a book, a radio serie, a movie, television.

Hitchhikersguide to the galaxy is certainly missing.

Douglas Adams had some great imagination.

Many manuals start or continue with: "Don't panic".

Also fun to quote with a sentence of his book. Especially when people never read te book at all. ;)

Too bad there has never been a movie of one of Terry Pratchetts books (oh sorry no computers in it....)

Reply Score: 2

RE: HHGTTG
by Neolander on Tue 13th Sep 2011 19:24 UTC in reply to "HHGTTG"
Neolander Member since:
2010-03-08

Too bad there has never been a movie of one of Terry Pratchetts books (oh sorry no computers in it....)

Not quite a movie, but I watched this TV film from Sky1 on MegaVideo and can attest that it was quite good :

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Colour_of_Magic_%28TV_film~*~@...

Reply Score: 1

encryption
by coyote_sprit on Tue 13th Sep 2011 21:25 UTC
coyote_sprit
Member since:
2011-09-13

This may not relate to any specific computers in film scene but I feel the need to bring this up.

Am I the only one who gets annoyed when a "hacker" in a movie breaks a 128 bit of 256 bit encryption in mere seconds? I know it's for the sake of narrative but that still doesn't stop me from getting annoyed.

Reply Score: 2

RE: encryption
by Alfman on Tue 13th Sep 2011 22:11 UTC in reply to "encryption"
Alfman Member since:
2011-01-28

coyote_spirit,

"Am I the only one who gets annoyed when a 'hacker' in a movie breaks a 128 bit of 256 bit encryption in mere seconds? I know it's for the sake of narrative but that still doesn't stop me from getting annoyed."

Remember the scene from swordfish where John Travolta threatens to kill a hacker if he cannot break into the FBI (or whatever agency it was) in a minute or so?

Reply Score: 3

RE[2]: encryption
by Soulbender on Wed 14th Sep 2011 00:22 UTC in reply to "RE: encryption"
Soulbender Member since:
2005-08-18

Yeah, but come on, he's getting a blowjob while breaking it. Also, there's a crazy criminal pointing a large gun at his head. Who wouldn't succeed under those circumstances? Gritty realism, I say.

Reply Score: 3

RE[3]: encryption
by Alfman on Wed 14th Sep 2011 01:54 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: encryption"
Alfman Member since:
2011-01-28

Soulbender,

"Yeah, but come on, he's getting a blowjob while breaking it. Also, there's a crazy criminal pointing a large gun at his head. Who wouldn't succeed under those circumstances? Gritty realism, I say."

Damn, I must be doing it all wrong.

Reply Score: 3

Sadly I am old enough...
by Tony Swash on Tue 13th Sep 2011 21:54 UTC
Tony Swash
Member since:
2009-08-22

Sadly I am old enough to remember my first encounter with an electronic calculator. I thought it was fantastic and sat and calculated square roots for an hour. Sometimes I have a very strong sense of living in the future, a future that turned out to be both tediously similar to the past whilst also being unexectadley different in so many ways and mostly nothing like the way the movies guessed it would be.

Reply Score: 2

RE: Sadly I am old enough...
by zima on Mon 19th Sep 2011 23:59 UTC in reply to "Sadly I am old enough..."
zima Member since:
2005-07-06

Hm, it might seem that you approach the world through the lenses of your atypical experiences as a rule / routine / a matter of practice? I am what you would uncomplimentary call a "brat" or such ...and yet I also remember such encounters, experiences. In fact the "first electronic calculator" (for me) is a dozen or so meters away right now (unfortunately not 100% working, but hopefully an overdue cleaning of tarnished contacts will do the trick when I finally get myself to doing it)

2m from me, a completely mechanical typewriter (Groma Kolibri, still actively used a decade ago; electric ones barely having a chance before the advent of PCs & printers). It was even easy to hang on to one mechanical drum adder (mostly working; just needs quite a bit of strength to operate, so what it really needs: disassembly, crud removal, and few drips of new oil)

And this all in a place which was, also at the time, one of the more prosperous; majority of humanity now would probably love to live in such place then, what it was then (and BTW, ~70% of them are mobile subscribers, 20+% listens on their mobiles to music; this is the dominating type of digital audio player, after very short few years of perturbations around dedicated contraptions)


Generally, yeah, it's typical of popculture to be quite wrong when predicting the future (and that's the case over the ages - how many false predictions, also of "ultimate" / world ending magnitude, there were in the ultimate artefacts of popular culture: some of the most lasting and all-encompassing social orgs & movements around?)

Edited 2011-09-20 00:18 UTC

Reply Score: 2

What about recent movies?
by benali72 on Fri 16th Sep 2011 22:47 UTC
benali72
Member since:
2008-05-03

Please, another article but this time covering more recent movies. Minority Report, Matrix, etc!

Reply Score: 1