Linked by Thom Holwerda on Tue 20th Sep 2011 21:46 UTC
PDAs, Cellphones, Wireless Ever since Honeycomb's release, Android has had two versions out in the wild (well, if you disregard the non-current versions, that is). The next major Android release, Ice Cream Sandwich, is supposed to fix this problem by having one single version of Android for both phones and tablets. Google now has a blog post up which presents some options for developers to prepare their applications for Ice Cream Sandwich.
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foss version
by fran on Wed 21st Sep 2011 13:41 UTC
fran
Member since:
2010-08-06

It's also been said that this version will see an open source code release.

Reply Score: 2

RE: foss version
by Thom_Holwerda on Wed 21st Sep 2011 14:05 UTC in reply to "foss version"
Thom_Holwerda Member since:
2005-06-29

It's also been said that this version will see an open source code release.


About damn time.

Reply Score: 1

jabbotts Member since:
2007-09-06

They made no secret about the plan. Every version previous to Honeycomb had a code dump. They stated that Honecomb would not be dumped and are continuing to state that Icecream Sandwitch will have a code dump. Nothing new here.

(I'm just not sure what part of all of this is a surprise leading to the "about time" sentiment is all.)

Reply Score: 2

fran Member since:
2010-08-06

Jabotts
About the suprise sentiment. Below help explains why. It's not open sourced every time.

Article Techradar 08 Sep 11
http://www.techradar.com/news/mobile-computing/ice-cream-sandwich-e...


Quote "We also know that Google is intending to make Ice Cream Sandwich fully open source. It didn't do this with Android 3.0 Honeycomb in an attempt to make things more consistent.

"It's more manageable to start small and get bigger," says Andy Rubin, senior vice president of Mobile at Google.

"It's an open invitation; there's no reason not to have everybody in [The Open Handset Alliance] - but I want to hit the ground running, I don't want to take a lot of time on building a list of names."

Reply Score: 2

jabbotts Member since:
2007-09-06

Seems like they are still on schedual.
- older versions released.
- honeycomb source held back.
- icecream Sandwitch released.

They've always said that honeycomb source would not be released where icecream sandwitch will merge the two source trees and be made available for download.

If what I'm missing here is that they are going to release the OSS parts of icecream sandwitch (all but hardware drivers?) then it's a big fat "meh" as this was always the stated outcome and timeframe.

If what I'm missing is that the entire Anroid stack is going to be delivered under an open license including kernel hardware modules and firmware then yeah, that's a huge "about time" probably only second to delivering a standardized distribution across devices claiming to be Android branded.

Reply Score: 2

I'm fine with this.
by jboss1995 on Wed 21st Sep 2011 14:08 UTC
jboss1995
Member since:
2007-05-02

You don't see apple releasing a open version of iOS and Microsoft releasing a open version of windows. So I'm fine with Google keeping some of there code closed. AT least they support the opensource. Yes i know about Darwin and MS releasing some code but nothing compared to what Google has done for the opensource community.

Reply Score: 3

RE: I'm fine with this.
by TechGeek on Wed 21st Sep 2011 17:45 UTC in reply to "I'm fine with this."
TechGeek Member since:
2006-01-14

The thing I like about them open sourcing it is that the 3rd party gui makers are doing excellent work. Cyanogenmod is awesome, but needs the OS to be open source to work. I have already decided I will buy a Transformer 2 IF and ONLY IF the next version of Android is open sourced. Otherwise I will buy something I can load a full Linux distro on. (which may be a transformer, havent looked into that option yet)

Reply Score: 2

RE: I'm fine with this.
by dagw on Fri 23rd Sep 2011 13:09 UTC in reply to "I'm fine with this."
dagw Member since:
2005-07-06

You don't see apple releasing a open version of iOS and Microsoft releasing a open version of windows.

You don't see Apple and MS harping on about how open their OS is and making it a key part of their advertising.

Reply Score: 2

Comment by bolomkxxviii
by bolomkxxviii on Wed 21st Sep 2011 14:53 UTC
bolomkxxviii
Member since:
2006-05-19

Just release the SDK already!

Reply Score: 2

A 'nice' Android phone UI, at last!
by pmac on Wed 21st Sep 2011 15:52 UTC
pmac
Member since:
2009-07-08

Honeycomb UI: awesome. Pre-Honeycomb UI: as bad as a Metacity theme. Undoubtedly, it will be a serious pain to convert everything to work in (at least) two different ways, but once the work's done, it's done for good, and finally apps on Android phones won't be the ugly cousins of iOS apps.

Fragments are a great idea, and a great way to manage this. I just wish they'd resolve some of the issues: programatically-defined fragments can't replace layout-defined ones etc.

I think we'll be at the point with ICS where nothing about Android is vastly inferior to iOS. Possibly Windows 8 will bring new areas to catch up on, though.

Reply Score: 2

Non Installable Apps
by shotsman on Wed 21st Sep 2011 16:14 UTC
shotsman
Member since:
2005-07-22

Android is a failure as far as I'm concerned.
To get rid of things like Twitter, Gmail, Facebook etc I have to root the device.
That is enough to make me mark it 'Must do better'. I'd like to think that with Ice Cream Sandwitch, google will make everything user uninstallable that is not crucial to the basic operation of the device. The question is, will they? Somehow I doubt it.

I have a HTC Sensation and I'm getting rid of it and going back to my trusty old 6310. If there were issues with calls on the iPhone 4 then this sucker must be an awful lot worse.
So endeth my brief foray into the smartphone world.
- Apps you can't delete
- Incoming calls you can't hear.

Yes, I am one of those few people who don't use any Social networking sites. I did once (At the behest of my kids) and after my id was stolen, I refuse to do so again.

Reply Score: 2

RE: Non Installable Apps
by fran on Wed 21st Sep 2011 17:30 UTC in reply to "Non Installable Apps"
fran Member since:
2010-08-06

Like you i'm not interested in social apps but my experience with Android is great.
I have installed/uninstalled a lot of apps over time and it never posed a problem for me.

I mainly use the Kindle app and Opera mini in which i've build a nice collection of bookmarks i browse before i dowse off.

Sometime i use the native browser as well which is pretty good. I've used the GPS function also a few times and the pc software for sms/mms and contact syncing. Syncing it to my wifi was also a breeze.

So yeah i love my Android phone. Guess different strokes.

Reply Score: 3

jabbotts Member since:
2007-09-06

If your phone is coming with social media apps you can't remove without rooting the device, you need to take that up with the device manufacturer; they still have control over what software is bundled and what they dicide the customer wants.

Now, if we get to the point where vendors are shipping devices with stock Anroid installs instead of one-off customized crapware bundles then I'll be right beside you yelling at Google's receptionist.

Reply Score: 2

anevilyak Member since:
2005-09-14

The issue in the OP's case is that the apps in question are installed on the OS partition. As a security measure, Android mounts the system partition read-only, with a separate read/write one for apps. As a consequence, the apps which live on said system partition can't be removed. (Note that poor choice of partitioning scheme is why some android phones also have lackluster amounts of storage available for app installation).

Reply Score: 2

jabbotts Member since:
2007-09-06

That is interesting as I've not looked at how android devices are partitions. Good to hear they are similar to Maemo partitioning though.

I don't see that this changes anything though. Who put theapps in place? Are these social media client applications that are part of the stock Android distribution or are they post Google additions that the menufacturer has dropped on the device before shipping it to the customer.

If google made social media apps a required components of Android then booo Google! Have at it.

If xyz-phones made social media apps a required component of the mobile phone which happens to also run Android then booo xyz-phones Incororated! You can't blame Android and Google for what OS curruptions the manufacturer put in place while assembling the device.

In this case, if they OP's phone had these apps which are imposed by the phone manufacturer not the Android OS then they should have shopped around and baught from a different phone manufactuer; hense, it is an issue to take up with the phone manufacturer not the OS developer.

Trust me, I'm no Android fan but watching any OS get slammed for things outside of the developer's control doesn't sit well. Especially when the customer has/had solutions available.

Reply Score: 2

anevilyak Member since:
2005-09-14

At least some of them are part of the base android install, i.e. Facebook and Twitter are both present in the stock Gingerbread images used on the Nexus devices. I haven't messed with the alternate builds that Motorola/HTC/Samsung make so I don't know what others they might bundle.

Reply Score: 2

molnarcs Member since:
2005-09-10

Hmmm, I uninstalled both Twitter and Facebook from my Nexus S without a problem. Not rooted, stock ROM shipped (and updated through OTA). GApps I haven't tried, what's the point? I use them all.

Reply Score: 2

Cool...
by tomcat on Wed 21st Sep 2011 20:02 UTC
tomcat
Member since:
2006-01-06

So it will be easier to create an app that sucks as bad on the phone as it does on an Android tablet. Cool.

Reply Score: 2

RE: Cool...
by lemur2 on Fri 23rd Sep 2011 00:47 UTC in reply to "Cool..."
lemur2 Member since:
2007-02-17

So it will be easier to create an app that sucks as bad on the phone as it does on an Android tablet. Cool.


Apple is getting very scared of some emerging Android tablets to such an extent that it has tried to ban them from getting offered to people.

Here is an article by someone named Davey Winder that perhaps uncovers the real reason why Apple is running scared:

http://www.daniweb.com/hardware-and-software/netbooks-tablets-and-m...

Is banned Android Samsung Galaxy Tab 10.1 better than the Apple iPad 2?


Verdict

The Samsung Galaxy Tab 10.1 is, without any shadow of a doubt, the best Android-powered tablet to date. In fact, it's even better than the iPad 2. There, we said it. Let's just hope that all the design and patent silliness gets sorted so that consumers everywhere can discover that there is life outside of Apple when it comes to truly stunning tablet devices.

Not everyone has come to the conclusion that Android tablets suck. In fact, for some devices, the conclusion is quite the opposite.

Apparently, Apple doesn't want consumers to discover this.

Reply Score: 3

RE[2]: Cool...
by tomcat on Sun 25th Sep 2011 18:29 UTC in reply to "RE: Cool..."
tomcat Member since:
2006-01-06

Apple isn't necessarily scared. YET. They're just using the patent/trademark/copyright system to avoid competing to the maximum extent possible. They don't want to repeat what happened when cheap clone PCs ate the Mac's lunch. But it's going to happen, regardless of what Apple does. It's only delaying its fall from grace.

Edited 2011-09-25 18:29 UTC

Reply Score: 2