Linked by Thom Holwerda on Wed 5th Oct 2011 20:45 UTC, submitted by danbuter
Legal Fascinating infographic on the all the patent stuff going on in the mobile world today. Another infographic summarises the patent lawsuits between Apple and Samsung specifically (via). On a sidenote, what's the deal with infographics these days? Did someone decide they were cool without telling me?
Order by: Score:
Comment by shmerl
by shmerl on Wed 5th Oct 2011 21:52 UTC
shmerl
Member since:
2010-06-08

Something is missing there (i.e. Apple and Samsung are portrayed as equal). Is Samsung known for active patent trolling and abusing patents in offensive manner like Apple? So far Samsung is forced to wage war because of Apple's attacks, which I'd say is the only reasonable way to apply these patents, and that's what defensive patent pools are for (i.e. if someone attacks member of the pool with patents, pool patents are used to strike the attacker back).

The only functional way to stop greed-blinded patent abusers is to get them into the MAD situation, which will force them to stop fighting.

Edited 2011-10-05 21:57 UTC

Reply Score: 5

v Fascinating?
by WorknMan on Wed 5th Oct 2011 21:56 UTC
RE: Fascinating?
by Thom_Holwerda on Wed 5th Oct 2011 22:09 UTC in reply to "Fascinating?"
Thom_Holwerda Member since:
2005-06-29

This is defining the technology world RIGHT NOW, and will shape the tech world of the future. Not reporting on this is irresponsible. Just because you find it boring doesn't mean no one should report on it.

People like you come up all the time, for different topics. Now it's patents, but we've had people like you for Ubuntu, Windows 7, the iPhone, the iPad, heck, even about Amiga.

I'm sorry I can't please everyone. You'll just have to live with it ;) .

Reply Score: 6

RE[2]: Fascinating?
by WorknMan on Wed 5th Oct 2011 23:00 UTC in reply to "RE: Fascinating?"
WorknMan Member since:
2005-11-13

This is defining the technology world RIGHT NOW, and will shape the tech world of the future. Not reporting on this is irresponsible.


I didn't ask you WHY you were reporting on it. After all, I'm sure you wouldn't bother reporting on it if you didn't think it could accomplish anything. I'm just asking what you think/hope writing about it will accomplish, given the fact that are elected representatives (and pretty much anybody who ends up on a voting ballot) work for the patent holders.

I mean do you envision mass boycotts of these companies, overthrowing the government by force, or what? Basically, instead of posting half a dozen patent rants every week, how about we start talking solutions?

Edited 2011-10-05 23:01 UTC

Reply Score: 2

RE[3]: Fascinating?
by Lazarus on Wed 5th Oct 2011 23:40 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Fascinating?"
Lazarus Member since:
2005-08-10

"This is defining the technology world RIGHT NOW, and will shape the tech world of the future. Not reporting on this is irresponsible.


I didn't ask you WHY you were reporting on it. After all, I'm sure you wouldn't bother reporting on it if you didn't think it could accomplish anything. I'm just asking what you think/hope writing about it will accomplish, given the fact that are elected representatives (and pretty much anybody who ends up on a voting ballot) work for the patent holders.

I mean do you envision mass boycotts of these companies, overthrowing the government by force, or what? Basically, instead of posting half a dozen patent rants every week, how about we start talking solutions?
"

This is a tech news site. They are here to report the various goings on in the technology world, not to post any given person's idea of what the solution to a given problem may be. That's what blogs and the comments section are for.

I don't see why these extremely obvious things I just typed are so hard for you to comprehend.

Reply Score: 7

RE[3]: Fascinating?
by Laurence on Thu 6th Oct 2011 08:53 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Fascinating?"
Laurence Member since:
2007-03-26


I didn't ask you WHY you were reporting on it. After all, I'm sure you wouldn't bother reporting on it if you didn't think it could accomplish anything. I'm just asking what you think/hope writing about it will accomplish, given the fact that are elected representatives (and pretty much anybody who ends up on a voting ballot) work for the patent holders.

I mean do you envision mass boycotts of these companies, overthrowing the government by force, or what? Basically, instead of posting half a dozen patent rants every week, how about we start talking solutions?

So you think it's better he just give up?

Besides, this is a news site, so why does he need a reason to publish news items?

Reply Score: 3

RE[3]: Fascinating?
by umccullough on Thu 6th Oct 2011 15:50 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Fascinating?"
umccullough Member since:
2006-01-26

given the fact that are [sic] elected representatives (and pretty much anybody who ends up on a voting ballot) work for the patent holders.


I think you basically summarized it yourself right there.

The more often this ridiculousness shows up in the press, the more people will continue to push back on their public officials to do something about it.

More and more people I know are becoming familiar with the patent lawsuits and how harmful they are to consumers. If every blog and news site keeps ramming this down people's throats, they have no choice but to become informed.

The more often they see it, the more often they'll think about it.

Stop pretending the world doesn't work this way.

FWIW, I read almost every article about this topic, even though I'm already extremely familiar with it - and I hope to get some tidbit of information out of each one that I can use to educate myself and others on the intricacies - so stuff it.

Reply Score: 4

RE[4]: Fascinating?
by zima on Thu 6th Oct 2011 23:41 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: Fascinating?"
zima Member since:
2005-07-06

FWIW, I read almost every article about this topic, even though I'm already extremely familiar with it

I think there might a point of diminishing returns somewhere there, a "good enough" one (generally, wasting one bit of life here, another there...)

Reply Score: 2

"Why Software Patents Should End"
by atsureki on Sun 9th Oct 2011 16:33 UTC
atsureki
Member since:
2006-03-12

Many critics of the current patent system[who?] have likened software to spoken language[emphasis original] - in essence, we all use the same language [no we don't], but recombine it in different ways to form new meanings. So it is with software, they[who?] say. And since we can't patent languages[or any natural phenomenon, but we can copyright those recombinations], why should we be able to patent software? [Because it is the result of research, invention, and hard work, and it does everyone good for that result to be published.] If the enormous war being waged between the tech companies is any indication, the current system does not work. [Patent infringement is a civil matter until Congress makes something like the DMCA. The "enormous war" is the system working.] The time for reform is now![emphasis original]


That is by far the least relevant, least coherent argument against software patents I've ever seen. Patents are bad because they lead to lawsuits. Well, then drunk driving laws are bad because they lead to arrests. You have to make some kind of case with evidence that intervention is worse than non-intervention, or in this case, that protection is worse than non-protection.

The only instance in which that case was even partially made was with patent trolls (NPEs), but the closing paragraph actually disregards them by describing a "war being waged between tech companies", and patent trolls are not tech companies.

I would argue that we can't have standards without patents. Without patents, all inventions are proprietary trade secrets, and without FRAND, all standards are government fiat, and we all know how slow government moves.

Reply Score: 2