Linked by Eugenia Loli on Thu 13th Oct 2011 00:28 UTC
General Unix Twitter is currently buzzing about the death of Dennis Ritchie, the visionary creator of UNIX and C, among other things. We hope it's just a false rumor. Story developing, we will be updating. Update: Unfortunately, it seems to be confirmed. Rob Pike, co-creator of the Plan 9 and Inferno OSes, who has worked with Ritchie in the past, and he's currently working for Google's GO language, posted this.
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v horrible to hear
by _xenu on Thu 13th Oct 2011 00:49 UTC
RE: horrible to hear
by jacquouille on Thu 13th Oct 2011 01:02 UTC in reply to "horrible to hear"
jacquouille Member since:
2006-01-02

Let's be very clear that _if_ this were true, this would completely dwarf, in importance and significance, the story about Steve Jobs... UNIX + C is /big/.

Reply Score: 33

RE[2]: horrible to hear
by _xenu on Thu 13th Oct 2011 01:10 UTC in reply to "RE: horrible to hear"
_xenu Member since:
2011-07-16

Nobody else seems to be reporting this. There's nothing on Google news.

Reply Score: 1

RE[3]: horrible to hear
by yoshi314@gmail.com on Thu 13th Oct 2011 04:28 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: horrible to hear"
yoshi314@gmail.com Member since:
2009-12-14

sadly, probably because it's not sensational enough. ;)

Reply Score: 2

RE[4]: horrible to hear
by Thom_Holwerda on Thu 13th Oct 2011 06:58 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: horrible to hear"
Thom_Holwerda Member since:
2005-06-29

sadly, probably because it's not sensational enough. ;)


Invent the C programming language and UNIX, then die: nobody gives a shit.

Market other people's technologies to rich white kids, then die: HE WAS LIKE FCUKING EINSTEIN ZOMG EDISON WTFBBQ.

I don't want to live on this planet any more.

Reply Score: 30

RE[5]: horrible to hear
by Almafeta on Thu 13th Oct 2011 07:56 UTC in reply to "RE[4]: horrible to hear"
Almafeta Member since:
2007-02-22

Invent the C programming language and UNIX, then die: nobody gives a shit.

Market other people's technologies to rich white kids, then die: HE WAS LIKE FCUKING EINSTEIN ZOMG EDISON WTFBBQ.

I don't want to live on this planet any more.


You're hearing the grief for Steve Jobs because Richie did his job well and well enough. That in and of itself is a fitting tribute to his legacy.

Reply Score: 6

RE[6]: horrible to hear
by Gone fishing on Thu 13th Oct 2011 08:20 UTC in reply to "RE[5]: horrible to hear"
Gone fishing Member since:
2006-02-22

We are comparing Dennis Ritchie and Steve Jobs for the arbitrary reason they died at almost the same time - this is a mistake.

I know as a Linux and a FreeBSD user and a computer user that I am very grateful for the contributions of Dennis Ritchie. I hope it is comfort to his family that so many people are grateful for his contributions to computing.

Reply Score: 6

RE[5]: horrible to hear
by MacTO on Thu 13th Oct 2011 08:04 UTC in reply to "RE[4]: horrible to hear"
MacTO Member since:
2006-09-21

In all likelihood, Jobs will be virtually forgotten twenty years from now. A hundred years from now, Ritchie will be remembered. The reason is simple: historians have a tendency to choose the significant figures and ignore the rest. Ritchie was a significant figure because he helped to define programming languages and operating systems. In effect, he was a 'nation builder.' Yet Jobs was more of a pop culture icon. His real contributions were in the 1970's and 1980's when he helped to build a business that popularized computers. But the reality is that there were hundreds of people waiting to step up and take his place. You can't say the same thing for Ritchie.

Reply Score: 15

RE[6]: horrible to hear
by Kebabbert on Thu 13th Oct 2011 08:15 UTC in reply to "RE[5]: horrible to hear"
Kebabbert Member since:
2007-07-27

In all likelihood, Jobs will be virtually forgotten twenty years from now. A hundred years from now, Ritchie will be remembered. The reason is simple: historians have a tendency to choose the significant figures and ignore the rest. Ritchie was a significant figure because he helped to define programming languages and operating systems. In effect, he was a 'nation builder.' Yet Jobs was more of a pop culture icon. His real contributions were in the 1970's and 1980's when he helped to build a business that popularized computers. But the reality is that there were hundreds of people waiting to step up and take his place. You can't say the same thing for Ritchie.

It makes sense.

There are lot of big business men back in the 19th century. Who remembers them? No one. But many have heard about Cantor (19th), Einstein (20th century), etc. The scientists.

Who know about big business 2000 years ago? Who know about Pythagoras who lived 2000 years ago?


If you discover a new important scientific discovery, you will be remembered even 1000s of years later.

Reply Score: 4

RE[7]: horrible to hear
by tylerdurden on Thu 13th Oct 2011 18:50 UTC in reply to "RE[6]: horrible to hear"
tylerdurden Member since:
2009-03-17

Products are temporary, good ideas are eternal.

Steve Jobs's fortune came to life by the sword of built-in obsolesce, and his legacy will die by it. Once the "next big thing" disrupts the market nobody will remember him.

Reply Score: 6

RE[6]: horrible to hear
by steve_s on Thu 13th Oct 2011 11:30 UTC in reply to "RE[5]: horrible to hear"
steve_s Member since:
2006-01-16

Only time will tell how history judges these two men, and personally I find it difficult to judge the comparative contributions of the two.

My feeling is that you are undervaluing the contributions that Jobs made. Whilst they began in the 70s and 80s, they continued through right up until he died. The value of bringing easy to use, high technology, mass-market products like the Apple ][, Mac, iPod, iPhone, and iPad to the market should not be underestimated. In virtually every one of those product examples the prevailing wisdom was that it couldn't be done.

In contrast Ritchie's contributions of C and UNIX were done before Steve Jobs' career began. Their value is not to be underestimated, since they serve as valuable foundations for much of what has followed.

Whilst you say that there were others waiting to step up and take the place of Jobs at his rise, the same can also be said of Ritchie. Sure, the industry was younger with less people involved so fewer could have taken his place, but there were other languages besides C, and Ritchie was one member of a team that produced Unix.

Let's face it - neither man is really well known outside of geeky circles. There are plenty of people, even those that own iPhones, that didn't know who Steve Jobs was. Far fewer people have heard of Dennis Ritchie - it is only geeks that have heard of him, and most only know him because his name is on the cover of the C book.

The fact is that both men have their place. They will both be missed. This is not a competition.

Reply Score: 9

RE[6]: horrible to hear
by Laurence on Thu 13th Oct 2011 11:34 UTC in reply to "RE[5]: horrible to hear"
Laurence Member since:
2007-03-26

In all likelihood, Jobs will be virtually forgotten twenty years from now. A hundred years from now, Ritchie will be remembered. The reason is simple: historians have a tendency to choose the significant figures and ignore the rest. Ritchie was a significant figure because he helped to define programming languages and operating systems. In effect, he was a 'nation builder.' Yet Jobs was more of a pop culture icon. His real contributions were in the 1970's and 1980's when he helped to build a business that popularized computers. But the reality is that there were hundreds of people waiting to step up and take his place. You can't say the same thing for Ritchie.


That comment was true for a time when education was a luxury so records were kept by the learned.

However these days everything we say is recorded and saved. So the millions of transcripts from the masses echoing Steve Jobs's name will totally drown the few tributes to Dennis Ritchie from us geeks.

The information age is a double edged sward. ;)

Reply Score: 3

RE[7]: horrible to hear
by MacTO on Thu 13th Oct 2011 15:40 UTC in reply to "RE[6]: horrible to hear"
MacTO Member since:
2006-09-21

I think that you will find it equally true today. Every age creates far more information that it can handle. A lot of that information ends up destroyed. A lot more ends up being ignored by future generations.

What matters though is what we choose to pass on to successive generations. I think that Ritchie has a real opportunity to be passed on no matter how obscure he may be today. Perhaps it will only be in textbooks of the trade, but that is something. And it will be because he contributed to foundational knowledge.

Jobs is certainly a bigger figure today, and he made some big contributions. But those contributions were in the 80's when Apple was first on the scene and defined markets. So if Jobs is remembered, and I think that is a big if, it will be as part of Jobs & Wozniak. (The same goes for Woz, alas. If he's remembered it will be as Jobs & Wozniak too.)

Reply Score: 2

RE[5]: horrible to hear - comparisons
by jabbotts on Thu 13th Oct 2011 12:18 UTC in reply to "RE[4]: horrible to hear"
jabbotts Member since:
2007-09-06

I saw one post comparing the death of Mr Jobs to the death of President Kennedy.

A man who has had cancer for a decade and was really good at selling blinky lights and branding compared to a US president who died suddenly and violently infront of millions of whitnesses and who's murder never has been fully solved.

You want to talk about blowing things out of preportion.

Yeah, stadly, this is just the passing of someone who gave us modern computing and one of the most popular programming languages.. no biggie..

Reply Score: 5

RE[5]: horrible to hear
by tupp on Thu 13th Oct 2011 17:18 UTC in reply to "RE[4]: horrible to hear"
tupp Member since:
2006-11-12

Steve Jobs dies and then Dennis Ritchie dies.

Yet another example of the *nix camp copying Apple!

Reply Score: 6

RE[2]: horrible to hear
by zima on Thu 13th Oct 2011 01:34 UTC in reply to "RE: horrible to hear"
zima Member since:
2005-07-06

I'm not quite sure why it would "completely dwarf, in importance and significance, the story about Steve Jobs" (emphasis mine)

The momentum of stories about people, the significance attributed to them, depends largely on how much their subjects are visible to the public - which is clearly much more for Steve Jobs than it is for Dennis Ritchie.
And as for importance, also "UNIX + C is /big/" - well, it absolutely is, but... it's not like it depends in any way on the work, on the continuing existence of its creators at this point; it hasn't for a long time. More generally: people die, with males at ~70 having rather large probability of that, per unit of time.

It's sad if it's true, and we should remember his accomplishments (always, not only on such occasions; if "only" because they point out the conditions of fruitful environments, realizing which should be useful in shaping the future). But... well, too bad I'll probably be long dead before people get some perspective about the dead ;) (especially considering how humans seem to succumb more into "grief porn", lately http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mourning_sickness )

Edited 2011-10-13 01:40 UTC

Reply Score: 1

RE[2]: horrible to hear
by vegai on Thu 13th Oct 2011 13:31 UTC in reply to "RE: horrible to hear"
vegai Member since:
2005-12-25

Well, the difference is that Ritchie made his full contribution and succeeded in living to retirement while Jobs died rather young and probably would've had something to give still.

Edited 2011-10-13 13:32 UTC

Reply Score: 2

RE[2]: horrible to hear
by f0dder on Sat 15th Oct 2011 13:04 UTC in reply to "RE: horrible to hear"
f0dder Member since:
2009-08-05

Yeah, losing dmr is an *actual* loss ;)

Reply Score: 2

RE: horrible to hear
by UltraZelda64 on Thu 13th Oct 2011 01:15 UTC in reply to "horrible to hear"
UltraZelda64 Member since:
2006-12-05

Especially since we just lost Steve Jobs. I hope this isn't true.

Especially since? What the hell does Steve Jobs (or his death) have to do with the possible death of Dennis Ritchie?

Reply Score: 6

RE[2]: horrible to hear
by Morgan on Thu 13th Oct 2011 01:47 UTC in reply to "RE: horrible to hear"
Morgan Member since:
2005-06-29

Because we've now lost not one but two visionaries of the tech world within a week.

Reply Score: 3

RE[3]: horrible to hear
by zima on Thu 13th Oct 2011 02:07 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: horrible to hear"
zima Member since:
2005-07-06

Well I don't know about Steve Jobs, but Dennis Ritchie (also a mathematician, after all) would possibly reprimand us for that one ;) (probability of unrelated events, birthday paradox, and such)

Reply Score: 4

RE[3]: horrible to hear
by spstarr on Thu 13th Oct 2011 02:27 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: horrible to hear"
spstarr Member since:
2006-02-21

Without Dennis Ritchie there would be no Apple, No Jobs, No Microsoft, .. I can go on.... We owe a big respect for Dennis, RIP :'(

Reply Score: 8

RE[4]: horrible to hear
by JonathanBThompson on Thu 13th Oct 2011 06:35 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: horrible to hear"
JonathanBThompson Member since:
2006-05-26

Your knowledge of tech history is very limited, and clearly flat out wrong in this: C for microcomputers came well after either Apple or Microsoft was founded, and had no meaningful impact on the formation of either one: they (Apple and Microsoft) had no meaningful usage of C until many years after each was founded and successful, and other than their respective dives into their own Unix or similar OSes, C wasn't used by them at all: the machines they worked with had way too little RAM. MacOS and DOS were written mostly in assembly: the 8-bit OSes (other than Apple's UCSD Pascal system) were, definitely before the later CP/M mutants. C was way too much of a hog for native compiling in a sane way. Both Windows and MacOS (not OSX) had a lot of Pascal heritage before changing over to C-based languages as their major basis.

C has been very influential, sure, but did not make or break either Microsoft or Apple, though both have heavily used C and derivatives once they switched, to their benefit, with all the warts C has and all (seriously, it's such a very loose "standard" in so many ways).

Reply Score: 2

RE[5]: horrible to hear
by No it isnt on Thu 13th Oct 2011 09:18 UTC in reply to "RE[4]: horrible to hear"
No it isnt Member since:
2005-11-14

I think it would be fair to say that without Unix, no Next and no Next no OS X, and without OS X, the iPod (Classic, not Touch) would now be Apple's main product.

Reply Score: 5

RE[6]: horrible to hear
by danieldk on Thu 13th Oct 2011 10:45 UTC in reply to "RE[5]: horrible to hear"
danieldk Member since:
2005-11-18

There is no reason to believe they wouldn't have developed or bought another operating system (either NeXT or Apple). Windows (NT) was mostly written from scratch.

There are other possible parellel universes were other systems became dominant. But they didn't, and that speaks for Thompson and Ritchie's work, and they should be honored for that.

Reply Score: 2

RE[6]: horrible to hear
by DaFreak on Thu 13th Oct 2011 15:57 UTC in reply to "RE[5]: horrible to hear"
DaFreak Member since:
2008-04-08

I think it would be fair to say that without Unix, no Next and no Next no OS X, and without OS X, the iPod (Classic, not Touch) would now be Apple's main product.


"no Next no OSX" isn't true. Just have a look at the Copland project. It could also be a BeOS follower.
But without Unix no Linux. That's bad.

Nevertheless RIP Dennis Ritchie!

Reply Score: 1

RE[7]: horrible to hear
by No it isnt on Thu 13th Oct 2011 23:59 UTC in reply to "RE[6]: horrible to hear"
No it isnt Member since:
2005-11-14

BeOS is quite indebted to Unix (and C++ to C), and Copland never even reached Alpha status. Of course, this kind of alternate history is a bit rubbish anyway, since Jobs might have based Next on some alternate-history descendent of the system that gained popularity in the absence of Unix. It's not like there wouldn't be something else out there.

My idea was to point out how much Apple's current success builds on the work of Ritchie, but I phrased it wrong.

Reply Score: 3

RE[5]: horrible to hear
by doraemon on Thu 13th Oct 2011 12:00 UTC in reply to "RE[4]: horrible to hear"
doraemon Member since:
2008-04-06

Ehmmm. C and UNIX were born at the very first 70's, and the modern home computers apperaed at the late 70's - Altair was very good but it was for computer enthusiasts -...

Many of the first microcomputer and personal computer creators were educated in C and UNIX, and they choose BASIC because it's easier to learn and implement than C - less memory used -... If you wanted something simpler, you had Forth at hand :-), like in the Jupiter ACE: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jupiter_ACE.

MS-DOS, like other early commercial OSes for home computers, were first implemented in assembly - like UNIX itself -, but after a short time most of these OSes where re-implemented in C... Apple OS was an exception.

Dennis Ritchie made the house with good foundations, and Jobs - and Microsoft - made it beautiful to sell it.

Jobs was a good salesman, who knew what to do to sell existing good ideas. Ritchie was one of the men that created ideas... This is the reason that makes me really sad because of Ritchie's dead, but Job's dead only makes me to show respect.

Reply Score: 5

Rumor?
by jacquouille on Thu 13th Oct 2011 00:59 UTC
jacquouille
Member since:
2006-01-02

If you suspect it's a false rumor, why is this story titled 'Dennis Ritchie Dead at 70'? This affirmative phrasing is how it will show up in search engines and be quoted.

Also, when someone is really dead, it usually doesn't take long for that to become an official fact... what's the point of publishing such a story until you're sure about it?

Edited 2011-10-13 01:00 UTC

Reply Score: 1

RE: Rumor?
by Eugenia on Thu 13th Oct 2011 01:01 UTC in reply to "Rumor?"
Eugenia Member since:
2005-06-28

I have my reasons to believe that it's not false, that's why I went ahead with the story. But I hope it is false.

Reply Score: 1

Rob Pike on Google Plus
by ronaldst on Thu 13th Oct 2011 01:12 UTC
ronaldst
Member since:
2005-06-29
Damn you, Steve Jobs!
by eantoranz on Thu 13th Oct 2011 01:15 UTC
eantoranz
Member since:
2005-12-18

If you were to take someone with you, why did you take Dennis and not steveb or billg?

Reply Score: 4

RE: Damn you, Steve Jobs!
by eantoranz on Thu 13th Oct 2011 01:18 UTC in reply to "Damn you, Steve Jobs!"
eantoranz Member since:
2005-12-18

This is not an april fool's day prank is it?

Reply Score: 2

A truly sad week
by MacMan on Thu 13th Oct 2011 01:55 UTC
MacMan
Member since:
2006-11-19

Both Steve Jobs and Dennis Ritchie were visionaries who gave us good things.

Just waiting for Stallman to say something shitty about Dennis Ritchie...

Reply Score: 0

RE: A truly sad week
by BallmerKnowsBest on Thu 13th Oct 2011 14:34 UTC in reply to "A truly sad week"
BallmerKnowsBest Member since:
2008-06-02

Just waiting for Stallman to say something shitty about Dennis Ritchie...


http://www.theregister.co.uk/2011/10/10/stallman_glad_jobs_gone/

...wow. I didn't think that even Stallman would sink so low as to exploit someone's death for a PR stunt. Then again, I doubt he'll be the last - after Apple cynically exploited George Harrison's death for a marketing attention-grab, you can be DAMN sure they'll eventually do the same with Jobs' death.

Reply Score: 1

RE[2]: A truly sad week
by tylerdurden on Thu 13th Oct 2011 18:52 UTC in reply to "RE: A truly sad week"
tylerdurden Member since:
2009-03-17

I respect Stallman's principles, he stands by them regardless of wether they are popular or not.

A person dying is not an excuse to subsume principles or opinions. It is a very hypocritical expectation, especially in America.

Reply Score: 3

RE[3]: A truly sad week
by BallmerKnowsBest on Mon 17th Oct 2011 16:59 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: A truly sad week"
BallmerKnowsBest Member since:
2008-06-02

I respect Stallman's principles, he stands by them regardless of wether they are popular or not.

A person dying is not an excuse to subsume principles or opinions. It is a very hypocritical expectation, especially in America.


You know, if your statement is taken at face value (and in context with the comment you've replied to), then you've just implied that Stallman has no principle against gloating over someone's death.

Nicely done!

Reply Score: 2

Sad news
by demosthenese on Thu 13th Oct 2011 01:56 UTC
demosthenese
Member since:
2011-02-01

K&R's classic text on C programming was the most elegant learn-to-code book ever written.

Many owe him a great debt of gratitude, myself included.

Reply Score: 11

Hard to avoid comparisons
by FunkyELF on Thu 13th Oct 2011 03:07 UTC
FunkyELF
Member since:
2006-07-26

Dennis Ritchie's contributions are arguably more important but Job's. Rictchie's belong to the world while Job's belong to Apple. Job's stood on Ritchie's shoulders the whole time... and Ritchie will get just a tiny fraction of the publicity that Job's is getting.

Reply Score: 15

RE: Hard to avoid comparisons
by orestes on Thu 13th Oct 2011 04:20 UTC in reply to "Hard to avoid comparisons"
orestes Member since:
2005-07-06

I sincerely doubt either party worries much about it at this point. I would also hope that people wouldn't turn it into a posthumous epeen match by proxy.

Acknowledge the work that both men accomplished and learn something from their failures, and let it be beyond that.

Reply Score: 2

RE: Hard to avoid comparisons
by spiderman on Thu 13th Oct 2011 05:59 UTC in reply to "Hard to avoid comparisons"
spiderman Member since:
2008-10-23

I do have great respect for Ritchie and his death is very unfortunate and I mourn him.
I am not a fan of Apple but I found Steve Job's death very shocking because he was 56 and he died of cancer.
Ritchies' death is unfortunate but at 70, it's still too early but it is expectable. He could have lived some more years but 70 is reasonable.
But nobody should die at 56 in my opinion.

Reply Score: 1

RE: Hard to avoid comparisons
by danieldk on Thu 13th Oct 2011 10:50 UTC in reply to "Hard to avoid comparisons"
danieldk Member since:
2005-11-18

That's too easy. Ritchie and Thompson made a great operating system, that was only used in the confines of some universities and companies. Berkeley (BSD), Sun (Solaris), and later Linux and Apple (yes, Apple) brought UNIX to great heights. Without those other players, UNIX would probably be fairly obscure.

Jobs and Ritchie deserve equal respect. Ritchie for making a great operating system, jobs for making computers (the original Mac), smartphones, and tablets that don't suck. Which had a great impact on the lifestyles of a lot of people.

Reply Score: 0

RE[2]: Hard to avoid comparisons
by FunkyELF on Thu 13th Oct 2011 11:40 UTC in reply to "RE: Hard to avoid comparisons"
FunkyELF Member since:
2006-07-26

That's too easy. Ritchie and Thompson made a great operating system, that was only used in the confines of some universities and companies. Berkeley (BSD), Sun (Solaris), and later Linux and Apple (yes, Apple) brought UNIX to great heights. Without those other players, UNIX would probably be fairly obscure.


Not sure I agree with you. Unix was in heavy use running the internet before Apple switched to BSD. You may be right about Solaris and the other flavors of BSD, but at least someone can stand on Ritchie's shoulders without getting sued. You can get sued just for looking at Job's shoulders.

Don't forget that Ritchie was the co-creator of C as well. What is Windows written in? He had profound influence on any operating system that isn't a toy. And most of the toy OS's that aren't written in C are running on some Java or .NET VM implemented in C.

BTW... You don't need to go and point me to some OS written entirely in assembly OS or some self-hosting language... I'm sure they exist too.

Reply Score: 5

sakeniwefu Member since:
2008-02-26

BTW... You don't need to go and point me to some OS written entirely in assembly OS or some self-hosting language... I'm sure they exist too.

You seem to have come to the wrong blog. This is the one where registered users have heard about MenuetOS and use DexOS as their desktop OS.

Dennis Ritchie deserves being remembered. He was but one of the many involved in early Unix, but these men were inventing everything we take for granted today.

UNIXv6 sources are like ancient poetry in that they lack the refination of more modern pieces, but have a wild purity that is just impossible to emulate.


if (p1->op==NAME||p1->op==CON||p1->op==AUTOI||p1->op==AUTOD)
if (p->type!=LONG)
return(12);

Reply Score: 2

RE: Hard to avoid comparisons
by shylock_1 on Thu 13th Oct 2011 13:35 UTC in reply to "Hard to avoid comparisons"
shylock_1 Member since:
2011-10-13

A true Genius only identified by Genius only, not every by standard.

Reply Score: 1

RIP
by wgan on Thu 13th Oct 2011 03:31 UTC
wgan
Member since:
2006-08-28

#include <stdio.h>
#DEFINE RIP 1

int main (int argc, char *argv[])
{
printf("Goodbye, Dennis Ritchie, thanks for C!\n");

return RIP;
}

Reply Score: 10

His later works
by WorknMan on Thu 13th Oct 2011 03:34 UTC
WorknMan
Member since:
2005-11-13

What was he up to for the last 20-30 years? He was blazing a trail back in the early 70's, but I haven't heard of anything he's done from the 80's and beyond.

Not saying that he's done nothing... just that I don't know what he did after working on C and Unix.

Edited 2011-10-13 03:35 UTC

Reply Score: 1

RE: His later works
by dnebdal on Thu 13th Oct 2011 13:27 UTC in reply to "His later works"
dnebdal Member since:
2008-08-27

The more-unix-than-unix Plan 9 and later Inferno OSes, mostly. I've never really used either, but they're interesting research projects; taking the unix "everything is a file"-idea much further and generally aiming for some extreme network transparency.

Reply Score: 1

His book on C
by Vijayanandham on Thu 13th Oct 2011 06:46 UTC
Vijayanandham
Member since:
2010-01-19

It is the only text book i completed without any effort.RIP Sir.

Reply Score: 1

RE: His book on C
by Dr.Mabuse on Fri 14th Oct 2011 00:08 UTC in reply to "His book on C"
Dr.Mabuse Member since:
2009-05-19

It is the only text book i completed without any effort.RIP Sir.


Yes, his 'C' book is magnificent. Too many computing books today are just filler, print outs of man pages or just waffle.

Reply Score: 2

Farewell dmr, sweet dreams.
by burnttoys on Thu 13th Oct 2011 06:47 UTC
burnttoys
Member since:
2008-12-20

Your contributions to software are legion.

Only a handful of people are in the same bracket as dmr - Ken Thompson, John McCarthy, Grace Hopper, Dave Cutler. There's probably more but my mind is elsewhere.

Reply Score: 1

RIP
by diegoviola on Thu 13th Oct 2011 06:49 UTC
diegoviola
Member since:
2006-08-15

Thanks for your contributions to the world. You will never be forgotten. Rest in peace.

Reply Score: 5

R.I.P dmr
by SunOS on Thu 13th Oct 2011 08:10 UTC
SunOS
Member since:
2011-07-12

A true pioneer!

Reply Score: 1

RE: R.I.P dmr
by Mikaku on Thu 13th Oct 2011 08:50 UTC in reply to "R.I.P dmr"
Mikaku Member since:
2007-05-03

Absolutely!

Reply Score: 1

Thank you for everything and RIP
by TusharG on Thu 13th Oct 2011 09:03 UTC
TusharG
Member since:
2005-07-06

Yes I felt sad because of Steve Job's death but I'm feeling lot sad because of Sir Dennis Ritchie's death. I learned 'C' language reading his books. I taught 'C' to many students and earned money and respect.
I definitely owe him. RIP sir.

Reply Score: 3

Comment by KLU9
by KLU9 on Thu 13th Oct 2011 11:43 UTC
KLU9
Member since:
2006-12-06

I suppose Richie going within a week or so of Jobs is a natural combination: "The power of Unix with the ease of the Mac."

(One ticket to hell please.)

Reply Score: 2

Comment by Oliver
by Oliver on Thu 13th Oct 2011 12:04 UTC
Oliver
Member since:
2006-07-15

Rest in peace

Reply Score: 2

I owe him so much
by scobiej on Thu 13th Oct 2011 12:04 UTC
scobiej
Member since:
2011-10-13

I owe him my career. I'm a C and unix junkie and my K&R book is in tatters it's been used that much. Thank you Dennis. One of a kind.

Reply Score: 1

Comment by shylock_1
by shylock_1 on Thu 13th Oct 2011 13:29 UTC
shylock_1
Member since:
2011-10-13

... I admired the man in true sense whose profound legacy lamented every field in computer technology...A moving tribute to Denis M Richie, we all build our success on his hard work a real foundation, an indeed mountainous achievement by Denis; remain permanent outpost for every new comer, developer and computer technology enthusiast. HE the MAN who shown the inner working. He will be always be Hello ....

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

int main()
{

printf("\033[2J\033[;H"); /* Clear the screen */

printf("\nHello World -- by D M Richie\n\n");
printf("Your legacy remain radiant, an emanating lights for those\n");
printf("New and Young developer and an old timers those pass through\");
printf("your ERA - Denis M Richie.\n\n");

/* exit */
return (EXIT_SUCCESS);
}

/*********************
Rest in Peace.
**********************/

Reply Score: 1

RE: Comment by shylock_1
by FunkyELF on Thu 13th Oct 2011 14:07 UTC in reply to "Comment by shylock_1"
FunkyELF Member since:
2006-07-26

ritchie.c: In function ‘main’:
ritchie.c:11: error: missing terminating " character
ritchie.c:12: error: expected ‘)’ before ‘;’ token
ritchie.c:16: warning: passing argument 1 of ‘printf’ makes pointer from integer without a cast
ritchie.c:16: error: expected ‘;’ before ‘}’ token

Reply Score: 2

RE[2]: Comment by shylock_1
by shylock_1 on Thu 13th Oct 2011 14:13 UTC in reply to "RE: Comment by shylock_1"
shylock_1 Member since:
2011-10-13

Sorry.... there are no sixteen lines in the code. I wonder where did you get the last line for printf...?

Reply Score: 1

RE[3]: Comment by shylock_1
by FunkyELF on Thu 13th Oct 2011 15:35 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Comment by shylock_1"
FunkyELF Member since:
2006-07-26

Sorry.... there are no sixteen lines in the code. I wonder where did you get the last line for printf...?


There are 20 lines of code if you include the last comment "Rest in Peace".

You know that empty lines still count as lines right?
#include <stdio.h> was line 1 and the end of the main function "}" was at line 16.

In all cases when you code in C and get compile errors, you ignore everything but the top error, fix it, recompile, and see if that fixed the rest.

In this case it did.... line 11 was this...

printf("New and Young developer and an old timers those pass through\");

You started a string and didn't end it. Probably because you meant to put \n"); but instead put \");

Reply Score: 2

Always in threes
by ncgmac on Thu 13th Oct 2011 13:30 UTC
ncgmac
Member since:
2011-09-22

This makes 2 Tech giants. So there will likely be a third.

Reply Score: 1

v RE: Always in threes
by 1c3d0g on Thu 13th Oct 2011 14:41 UTC in reply to "Always in threes"
RE[2]: Always in threes
by tylerdurden on Thu 13th Oct 2011 19:11 UTC in reply to "RE: Always in threes"
tylerdurden Member since:
2009-03-17

Wishing the death of someone just because you disagree with his company's products. That is kind of extreme douchebaggery, don't you think?

Reply Score: 3

RE[3]: Always in threes
by 1c3d0g on Fri 14th Oct 2011 15:15 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Always in threes"
1c3d0g Member since:
2005-07-06

At least he won't be kicking chairs in your face, now would he? :-P

Reply Score: 2

He paved the way we walk on
by ebasconp on Thu 13th Oct 2011 14:26 UTC
ebasconp
Member since:
2006-05-09

dmr, you will be still alive through all the lines of code we write everyday using the language (or one of its derived languages) you created.

Edited 2011-10-13 14:27 UTC

Reply Score: 3

cheers to a great mind
by transputer_guy on Thu 13th Oct 2011 16:33 UTC
transputer_guy
Member since:
2005-07-08

I still get that tickle when I first used C and Unix. I had already used Algol60/Pascal/BCPL but C gave "all" of the machine back to the programmer, here it is, use it to do what you want. Want to throw in asm, no problem, freedom to push the pedal to the max. Even self modifying code (in asm) thrilled me.

Alas those freedoms led to its shortcomings too, but security and viruses were not on our minds then, we trusted fellow computer folks.

I still appreciate the terseness too, choose your own style. Even working on C compilers (LCC) has been fun.

Thank you Dennis


Also lets not forget that many of the giants of the 60s and 70s have been passing or will soon enough. I wonder if Knuth will ever finish his life work on Art of ... or what Wirth is up to today.

Reply Score: 3

R.I.P. Dennis Ritchie
by qroon on Thu 13th Oct 2011 16:34 UTC
qroon
Member since:
2005-10-21

UNIX and its various incarnations have been bringing the food on our table for the last 13 years.

* * * * *

Thanks OSNews for making this a head line. I know that general news sites will not cover his death. But among the tech sites I visit, OSNews is the only one that made this into a head line.

Reply Score: 4

Dennis Ritchie's Web Page
by james_parker on Thu 13th Oct 2011 17:50 UTC
james_parker
Member since:
2005-06-29

For many of us to reminisce, and others to see for the first time, here's the URL for Dennis Ritchie's Bell Labs web page:

http://cm.bell-labs.com/cm/cs/who/dmr/

For something of his sense of humor, be sure to follow the Labscam link.

Reply Score: 2

I can't believe some people.
by SReilly on Thu 13th Oct 2011 18:37 UTC
SReilly
Member since:
2006-12-28

This afternoon I told my fellow engineers in the UNIX, Linux and SAN engineering department that Dennis Richie had died at age 70 and most of my co-workers had no idea who I was talking about. That sucks!

Dennis Richie has had an incalculable impact on our world. Without him, this site would not exist.

Reply Score: 5

Sad Times: Dr. Dennis Ritchie
by lucere on Fri 14th Oct 2011 02:57 UTC
lucere
Member since:
2009-03-22

As a society we grow, improve, and adapt. A society is made of biological organisms and as such has the characteristics of any individual biological organism. Just as biological organisms adapt to their environment, a society adapts, but not as a result of the environment that forces adaptation of it's biological components. Instead a society adapts by the will of it's components. The will of special forward thinking individuals drive society forward. These individuals improve how we live our lives every day. They make it easier to accomplish tasks, make it easier to build enterprises, enable better health care, and improve the quality of, not only our short existence on this planet, but the short existence of all future generations.

Above all else, there is one feat of society that is remarkably powerful and aids the progression of that society in more ways than any other single characteristic. Without the development of language, we would have no collaboration, we would have no healthcare system, we would have no transference of information to the next generation to continue our work. Language is the network of society.

Dr. Dennis Ritchie has died. Dr. Dennis Ritchie contributed to society the most powerful contribution anyone can make to a society: language. Dr. Ritchie's language was a progressive language and not a language spoken by people, but a language used by the aids of people; Dr. Ritchie was the creator of the C programming language that is the basis for all computing today.

There is no technology any of us can practically use that does not exist because of the work contributed by Dr. Ritchie. The motivation of Dr.Ritchie was the progression of our society. The result is a tool that enables both individual progression and society progression without compromise. The C programing language was, among other reasons, designed to enable software to be easily portable across computer platforms. The Unix operating system, as an example, for which he was the primary developer, was able to be ported to every computer platform due to his language.

Our society exists as it exists thanks in great part to Dr. Dennis Ritchie.

Reply Score: 2

RE: Sad Times: Dr. Dennis Ritchie
by elmemo on Fri 14th Oct 2011 06:28 UTC in reply to "Sad Times: Dr. Dennis Ritchie"
elmemo Member since:
2007-04-28

I think there's still a lot he can contribute to the world in the coming years, Plan9 isn't dead yet.

Reply Score: 1

Dennis is not dead
by twitterfire on Sat 15th Oct 2011 16:30 UTC
twitterfire
Member since:
2008-09-11

He will continue to run in the hearts of billions of computers across the world for ever.

Reply Score: 2

I would be ashamed if:
by twitterfire on Sat 15th Oct 2011 16:49 UTC
twitterfire
Member since:
2008-09-11

- I would compare Mother Theresa with Paris Hilton
- I would compare Justin Bieber with John Lennon
- I would compare Mobutu Sese Seko with Gandhi
- I would compare Joseph Stalin with Winston Churcill
- I would compare Dubya with FDR
- I would compare Andy Warhol with Vincent van Gogh
- I would compare Eddie Murphy with Morgan Freeman
- I would compare Rob Schneider with Robert de Niro
- I would compare Twilight's author with Shakespeare
- I would compare Steve Jobs with Dennis Ritchie

Reply Score: 4

Is there
by twitterfire on Sat 15th Oct 2011 16:58 UTC
twitterfire
Member since:
2008-09-11

any respectable OS not written in C or some of its descendants? Any BI, MAJOR, IMPORTANT piece of software not written in C or some of its descendants?

Weren't C and its descendants the most copied languages and the most inspiring?

(I'm counting as descendants at least C, C++, Objective C, C#, Java and Javascript and even GLSL and HLSL)

Reply Score: 2

:o)
by ParadoxUncreated on Sun 16th Oct 2011 15:37 UTC
ParadoxUncreated
Member since:
2009-12-05

Ripadelic. Home to infinity.

Reply Score: 1

So long Dennis
by Raffaele on Sun 16th Oct 2011 17:24 UTC
Raffaele
Member since:
2005-11-12

"C" you in heaven!

Reply Score: 2