Linked by snydeq on Thu 3rd Nov 2011 15:10 UTC
General Development A small company called AppMobi is enabling developers to create HTML5 apps that tap into native hardware and OS capabilities of mobile devices, such as gravity sensing, accelerometer, GPS, camera, sound and vibration, and the file system, InfoWorld reports. 'Its MobiUs browser for iOS implements HTML5's DirectCanvas API for gaming, as well as the HTML5 local storage API for saving executables and data in the browser cache so that apps can run offline. But what makes MobiUs more than just yet another browser is the set of libraries AppMobi provides app developers to access native hardware and enable push messaging from Web apps.'
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by Hiev on Thu 3rd Nov 2011 15:33 UTC
Hiev
Member since:
2005-09-27

HTML is amazing but I'd like the browser to start supporting WebForms 2.0 because this:

<input type="date"/>

Is still not well supported.

Reply Score: 3

RE: ...
by johnnysaucepn on Thu 3rd Nov 2011 16:32 UTC in reply to "..."
johnnysaucepn Member since:
2006-08-22

Webforms is dead, the work done there has been integrated into HTML5.

http://developers.whatwg.org/the-input-element.html#attr-input-type

Reply Score: 1

v web apps
by FunkyELF on Thu 3rd Nov 2011 16:58 UTC
RE: web apps
by Dr.Mabuse on Mon 7th Nov 2011 03:11 UTC in reply to "web apps"
Dr.Mabuse Member since:
2009-05-19

Why the mod-down? Other than the not-so-gentle dig at the web languages, I feel the sentiments of this comment are not far off being spot-on.

Granted, I've seen some pretty funky things in web browsers these days, with WebGL and what not. Gmail and associated apps are pretty awesome too, but there is a serious down side to a lot of them.

For starters, try looking at the article posted a couple of days back on this site called: "What's It Like to Be Hacked?"

Generally speaking, I still prefer native apps and for a lot of things (*most* things) where there is no other way of going about day-to-day business.

I know a lot of people want to see the browser break the back of Windows as the defacto desktop interface of choice, but I just have the feeling this is never going to happen.

Reply Score: 1

Why not just contribute to Phonegap
by leos on Thu 3rd Nov 2011 17:00 UTC
leos
Member since:
2005-09-21

I don't understand why this is a separate library. Why not just improve Phonegap, which does the same thing?

Reply Score: 3

Security risks?
by jack_perry on Thu 3rd Nov 2011 18:15 UTC
jack_perry
Member since:
2005-07-06

Are there security risks to this?

Reply Score: 2

RE: Security risks?
by Lennie on Fri 4th Nov 2011 07:44 UTC in reply to "Security risks?"
Lennie Member since:
2007-09-22

No, these webapps get installed locally. They have as much access to the rest of the system as any other app (which obviously depends on what you allow it to do).

Reply Score: 2

RE[2]: Security risks?
by jack_perry on Fri 4th Nov 2011 19:55 UTC in reply to "RE: Security risks?"
jack_perry Member since:
2005-07-06

No, these webapps get installed locally. They have as much access to the rest of the system as any other app (which obviously depends on what you allow it to do).


I don't see how your explanation justifies the negative answer. Isn't the fact that they are installed locally, and have "access to the filesystem" (using the description above) precisely a worse security risk?

(I also don't see why I was modded down for asking a sincere question. I know that wasn't you, Lennie; I'm just saying.)

Reply Score: 1

Similar to Mozilla's WebAPI?
by another_sam on Thu 3rd Nov 2011 22:47 UTC
another_sam
Member since:
2009-08-19