Linked by Thom Holwerda on Thu 1st Dec 2011 23:39 UTC
Privacy, Security, Encryption In order to not end up with ten different posts or endless updates to the previous one, I'm using this post to assemble all the official responses from both carriers and device makers alike concerning the CarrierIQ rootkit/spyware/whatever. Update: Added official statement from HP regarding webOS (see bottom).
Order by: Score:
Busted basically.
by oiaohm on Fri 2nd Dec 2011 04:33 UTC
oiaohm
Member since:
2009-05-30

Now that Nokia claims that there phones don't have it. Next question what reporting features do nokia phones have if any.

Reply Score: 0

RE: Busted basically.
by daedalus on Mon 5th Dec 2011 08:31 UTC in reply to "Busted basically."
daedalus Member since:
2011-01-14

Eh, surely the same could be said of any phone? I don't see how this makes it look like Nokia have any more facilities for reporting usage data than any other manufacturer. For example, HP say they don't allow CarrierIQ either - but they don't say they don't use something else... So why "Busted"?

Reply Score: 1

RE: Busted basically.
by zima on Thu 8th Dec 2011 21:41 UTC in reply to "Busted basically."
zima Member since:
2005-07-06

Now, I'm sure, oiaohm, that you would categorically deny ever raping your significant other.
But then the real question would remain, who did you rape?

(yes, this is the style of argument you made; one quite popular with ~political TV "reporters" / propagandists in few places, BTW)

Reply Score: 2

Not in Finnish networks
by lvikstro on Fri 2nd Dec 2011 06:38 UTC
lvikstro
Member since:
2005-08-26

Checked on phones on almost all Finnish network operators and CarrierIQ isn't available here. Checked on Iphone iOS5,Android (Samsung,HTC) and Nokia (Symbian 60, Symbian^3)

Reply Score: 2

Let me think a moment
by dvhh on Fri 2nd Dec 2011 09:04 UTC
dvhh
Member since:
2006-03-20

Can you log keystroke on an iphone ? (probably power button and volume key ).

Reply Score: 4

Here's a good summary article...
by benali72 on Fri 2nd Dec 2011 11:26 UTC
benali72
Member since:
2008-05-03

Here's a non-technical article that explains in plain English why this controversy is important and what's at stake --

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/josh-levy/phone-spying-technology_b_1...

Reply Score: 1

Bill Shooter of Bul Member since:
2006-07-14

-1 Articles from HuffingtonPost are not known for their objectivity on any particular subject.

They are good for gauging other people's reactions on subjects, like a messaging board. But if you take them more seriously than some guy's random post on digg, you're crazy.

Reply Score: 3

But yet
by MattPie on Fri 2nd Dec 2011 13:28 UTC
MattPie
Member since:
2006-04-18

Not to go conspiracy theory here, but both my Verizon Droid Classic and B&N Nook have OS software updates this morning. Interesting timing?

Reply Score: 2

Comment by Jondice
by Jondice on Fri 2nd Dec 2011 13:45 UTC
Jondice
Member since:
2006-09-20

I won't say this wouldn't have happened if Dalvik were GPL, but my impression from watching the video the other day was that it either is hooking in through Dalvik or the kernel. In the latter case, shouldn't this also constitute a GPL violation?

Edited 2011-12-02 13:45 UTC

Reply Score: 2

RE: Comment by Jondice
by glarepate on Fri 2nd Dec 2011 17:01 UTC in reply to "Comment by Jondice"
glarepate Member since:
2006-01-04

The carriers just add a program to the OS before they flash it onto the phone and ship it. That doesn't violate the license for the OS, GPL or not.

Reply Score: 2

RE[2]: Comment by Jondice
by Jondice on Fri 2nd Dec 2011 19:24 UTC in reply to "RE: Comment by Jondice"
Jondice Member since:
2006-09-20

That wasn't my impression, as android (or parts of it) are definitely linked to parts of Carrier IQ, which is why it is basically impossible to remove.

Reply Score: 2

B.Y.O.P.
by sparkyERTW on Fri 2nd Dec 2011 14:07 UTC
sparkyERTW
Member since:
2010-06-09

It's news like this that make me glad my carrier (Wind Mobile in Canada) was very friendly to the use of externally purchased phones like my Nokia N900.

Reply Score: 1

Comment by Bounty
by Bounty on Fri 2nd Dec 2011 17:09 UTC
Bounty
Member since:
2006-09-18

I find this comment interesting.

"We collect enough information to understand the customer experience with devices on our network and how to address any connection problems, but we do not and cannot look at the contents of messages, photos, videos, etc., using this tool."

Which seems to contradict what video poster claims.

Reply Score: 2

RE: Comment by Bounty
by Alfman on Fri 2nd Dec 2011 18:53 UTC in reply to "Comment by Bounty"
Alfman Member since:
2011-01-28

Bounty,

It may be a genuine case of the tools collecting the information, but they don't store it or look at it.

But even so the privacy concerns are still there. It's like selling a computer having a key logger installed, but it's ok because the vendor promises not to actually use it to spy on you.

Reply Score: 2

carrier should not be selling the device
by Darkness on Fri 2nd Dec 2011 21:20 UTC
Darkness
Member since:
2005-08-27

I totally agree with the comment from Belgian ISP and carrier Telenet: software on handsets is more the responsibility of the phonemakers and android than the carrier.

The carrier provides a phone service and network, people should be able to use whatever (legal) phone they want, without tampering by the carrier. You don't buy your computer from your ISP, do you? Imagine the spyware they would try to shove down your throat...

Reply Score: 2

Alfman Member since:
2011-01-28

Darkness,
"...software on handsets is more the responsibility of the phonemakers and android than the carrier."

Except it's hardly the fault of the manufacturers if the carriers require the software to be loaded, or if the carriers install it themselves.

"The carrier provides a phone service and network, people should be able to use whatever (legal) phone they want, without tampering by the carrier."

Ideally yes, but consumers should be able to buy phones from the carriers with the expectation that their privacy won't be violated.

I don't know who's at fault in this case, but it could just as easily be the carriers. I'd trace back where the data is going (whoever they are) and hold them primarily accountable.

Reply Score: 2

Comment by Neonz
by Neonz on Sat 3rd Dec 2011 01:36 UTC
Neonz
Member since:
2011-12-03

Asked about CarrierIQ to all three Latvian GSM carriers (LMT, Tele2, BITE), they answered, that they are not installing anything. But will need to verify that with real devices.

Reply Score: 1

Americans!
by utumno on Sat 3rd Dec 2011 05:16 UTC
utumno
Member since:
2008-02-10

I could never understand why you guys always get a subsidized phone from a carrier? AFAIK , buying an unlocked phone in US is pretty much unheard of.

Carrier IQ is only one way in which carriers rape you in the a**. Actively disabling bluetooth is another, intrusive branding and preinstalled crapware and spyware is another. Wake up!

Reply Score: 3

RE: Americans!
by earksiinni on Sat 3rd Dec 2011 20:59 UTC in reply to "Americans!"
earksiinni Member since:
2009-03-27

I could never understand why you guys always get a subsidized phone from a carrier? AFAIK , buying an unlocked phone in US is pretty much unheard of.


So you think that it's unheard of because the option is available but we just choose not to exercise it? AFAIK, all the major carriers do not allow/do not support unlocked phones on their networks.

I think no contract plans are beginning to pick up some speed, though that's not the same thing as allowing unlocked phones. I use Boost, a smaller carrier that runs off of Sprint's network, which offers the cheapest unlimited plans on the market and only sells unsubsidized phones. However, I don't think that they're unlocked, and also I think that they only use CDMA and iDEN, so that rules out any third party GSM phones.

Reply Score: 1

RE[2]: Americans!
by zima on Thu 8th Dec 2011 22:10 UTC in reply to "RE: Americans!"
zima Member since:
2005-07-06

GSM networks support any GSM phone which will accept (which is unlocked) their SIM card (well, as long as sometimes-weird frequencies are accounted for; not much of a problem nowadays), that's the thing about GSM standard... GSM is GSM. And yeah, verified by some of my buddies who took (far) their own phones during a stay in your general region, for use with local networks.
(as for the other type of your local standards - as far as one can tell, they were meant to lock you in)

So it seems, at least, that you might have at large inaccurate perceptions about what's possible (aided by carrier PR, I bet), accept upgrade cycles and contracts as "inevitable".

Reply Score: 2

Requesting Info
by Wodenhelm on Sun 4th Dec 2011 00:17 UTC
Wodenhelm
Member since:
2010-07-16

Requesting info for Motorola (Electrify)/US Cellular, when available.

Reply Score: 1

Good Summary
by kateline on Sun 4th Dec 2011 06:13 UTC
kateline
Member since:
2011-05-19

Good update. Interesting to see what the vendors have to say about this all in one place.

Reply Score: 1