Linked by David Adams on Tue 10th Jan 2012 19:43 UTC
PDAs, Cellphones, Wireless According to a new report from research firm NPD, iOS’s U.S. market share (by sales) jumped from 26% in the third quarter of 2011 to 43% by October and November. Android, however, came out on top, with 47% market share during those two months, down from 60% in Q3.
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Jumped that much!!!
by thavith_osn on Tue 10th Jan 2012 21:15 UTC
thavith_osn
Member since:
2005-07-11

I find that hard to believe...

I am a Apple fanboy too :-)

Either way, I hope Android and iOS keep doing well, keep competing hard.

Reply Score: 4

Meaningless
by earksiinni on Tue 10th Jan 2012 21:28 UTC
earksiinni
Member since:
2009-03-27

The article claims that the market share of iOS jumped from 26% to 43% in less than a quarter. As if that weren't already hard to believe (not to mention Apple's habit of meaning "units shipped" when they say "units sold"), there's no indication of what "market" these guys are talking about. iOS powers not just iPhones but iPads, iPods, and Apple TV's as well.

Edited 2012-01-10 21:28 UTC

Reply Score: 2

RE: Meaningless
by Neolander on Wed 11th Jan 2012 19:58 UTC in reply to "Meaningless"
Neolander Member since:
2010-03-08

It is an amount of sales, not units on the market, which is presumably more sensitive to sudden changes. You are right that it is still weird to see such a big jump all of sudden though.

Reply Score: 1

Windows 7 vs. Win Mobile
by churlish_Helmut on Tue 10th Jan 2012 22:48 UTC
churlish_Helmut
Member since:
2010-04-12

Windows Mobile gained sales and is head on head with Windows Phone 7 ? Damnit ... it seems to be that Windows Phone 7 is really a loser.

Reply Score: 2

Makes sense
by JAlexoid on Wed 11th Jan 2012 12:36 UTC
JAlexoid
Member since:
2009-05-19

Consider the charts for Apple product sales.(You can derive them from Apple's reports)

A) December quarter has always had a huge spike in iPod sales, iPhone sales also had a big bump
B) Q4 had iPhone4s released and new releases always drove the sales up

If you put them together, you can see that such a jump is absolutely possible. In addition, iPhone now spans 0 to 400 price ranges.

So nothing "shocking" here.

Reply Score: 4

RE: Makes sense
by earksiinni on Wed 11th Jan 2012 20:33 UTC in reply to "Makes sense"
earksiinni Member since:
2009-03-27

But share as part of what...smartphones? Then why are they including ALL iOS devices? Cf. my complaint above.

One of the worst articles I've read in a while.

Reply Score: 2

RE: Makes sense
by zima on Fri 13th Jan 2012 02:09 UTC in reply to "Makes sense"
zima Member since:
2005-07-06

In addition, iPhone now spans 0 to 400 price ranges

Hm, I wouldn't expect you to give visibility & reinforce that myth... (one coming from total contract-costs blindness of course)

Reply Score: 2

RE: Makes sense
by dsmogor on Sat 14th Jan 2012 00:55 UTC in reply to "Makes sense"
dsmogor Member since:
2005-09-01

and by zero do you mean an used 3gs given by a friend who upgraded?

Reply Score: 2

This old chestnut?
by atsureki on Wed 11th Jan 2012 17:08 UTC
atsureki
Member since:
2006-03-12

iOS = three phones from one company.
Android ~ 50 phones from 5+ companies.
Android: slight lead in total sales.
...Android is on top!

Better yet, let's get actual-ish numbers.

sprint.com Android = 21, iPhone = 1
verizonwireless.com Android = 24, iPhone = 2
att.com Android = 19, iPhone = 3
t-mobile.com Android = 16, iPhone = 0

US Android:iPhone product ratio = 13.3:1
US Android:iPhone Sales ratio = 1.09:1
...Android is on top!

Oh, wait, throw in the Tablet and iPod Touch "markets," and the combined force of everything that runs Android is reduced to a rounding error.

...a rounding error that, if you lump together a bunch of unrelated devices from different companies in an artificially narrow category, is totally on top!*
(*Where by "totally" I mean "slightly.")

With leads like that, imagine all the money Android must be making for all parties involved.*
(*Where by "all parties involved" the truth is actually Samsung and no one else. Google makes $8-10 per user per year in ad revenue, and all its other OEM partners are struggling. But I'm sure this whole operation will somehow stabilize and crawl into the black, while retaining its unit lead and ironing out all the ownership experience issues like the fact that Android phones don't get any updates. Yup, any day now.)

Reply Score: 1

RE: This old chestnut?
by unclefester on Thu 12th Jan 2012 07:28 UTC in reply to "This old chestnut?"
unclefester Member since:
2007-01-13

I used to frequently read fanboi comments like this about Macs around 20 years ago. Apparently Macs were super profitable and all the PC makers were making five cents net profit per machine profit.

Remind me how that brilliant Apple Mac high margin business plan worked out.

Reply Score: 2

RE[2]: This old chestnut?
by bloodline on Thu 12th Jan 2012 09:17 UTC in reply to "RE: This old chestnut?"
bloodline Member since:
2008-07-28

I used to frequently read fanboi comments like this about Macs around 20 years ago. Apparently Macs were super profitable and all the PC makers were making five cents net profit per machine profit. Remind me how that brilliant Apple Mac high margin business plan worked out.


Actually, I think it was the stupidly high profit margin that Mac's had in the 90's which kept the company afloat while their sales tanked... It certainly wasn't a winning long term strategy, but they did keep their head above water until St. Jobs returned to lead them to salvation ;)

On Topic: I'd be surprised if Apple's gains are as high as that, these "estimates" seem a bit wild. Let's wait until the official figures are published by the various companies (if they actually choose to publish them!)

I will say this though, in September I was seeing a very high diversity of smart phones on the Tube (London underground)... Even saw a few people with blackberries and an ASUS tablet! But for the first two weeks of January, I would say 90% of devices ie seen have been Apple... Probably just reflective of people getting a new phone for Christmas and using them more than those of us who have had smart phones for years ;)

Reply Score: 1

RE: This old chestnut?
by unclefester on Thu 12th Jan 2012 09:28 UTC in reply to "This old chestnut?"
unclefester Member since:
2007-01-13

Australia is traditionally a very strong iPhone market.

However Telstra, Australia's largest phone company, currently doesn't even list the iPhone 4s. They only have the 3GS at a very expensive $429 on a prepaid plain.

www.mobicity.com.au/ a major online retailer doesn't have a single Apple model amongst their Top 10 best selling smartphones.

Reply Score: 2

RE: This old chestnut?
by dsmogor on Sat 14th Jan 2012 01:03 UTC in reply to "This old chestnut?"
dsmogor Member since:
2005-09-01

ok now imagine all if those oems still trying to compete with iphone with their s*tty feature phone oses. Android has literally saved their asses and did it for free. Samsung? Good luck with bada.
Ok they may not extract heaps of money manages to from its fan base they still earn much more than they would with feature phones.

Reply Score: 2

Beta
Member since:
2005-07-06

TC title is ‘iOS Market Share Up From 26% In Q3 To 43% In Oct/Nov 2011.’ So you’ve already buggered one thing up, it covers all iPhones.

TechCrunch’s title is even worse compared to the article content! I swear no editors know how to read or write anymore.

Reply Score: 3

zima Member since:
2005-07-06

It's worse than that... both titles lack "in the US" (one atypical place - say, with strangely low rates of mobile phone penetration among other things - which represents minority of sales; yes, a mention just line below, but the issue can make enough of a difference to make the titles quite spurious)

Because worldwide, who knows... maybe iOS gained, maybe their relative shares remained roughly unchanged, maybe Android continued its gains - we just don't know.
(we might try to guess something from the worldwide web traffic http://gs.statcounter.com/#mobile_os-ww-monthly-201107-201112 which seems to roughly reflect the report ...but then, that's also certainly partly how US dynamics tend to be over-represented in such web visitors stats, and how people with copious data contracts played with new toys a bit more)


(Beta & AV, something to do with b3ta?)

Reply Score: 2

and so ...
by kristoph on Wed 11th Jan 2012 23:56 UTC
kristoph
Member since:
2006-01-01

I recall Thom saying how this would not happen because Samsung release the Galaxy II S to counter the iPhone 4S.

Seriously though, I am glad both iOS and Android are doing well, it motivates both Google/Samsung and Apple to compete hard.

Reply Score: 3

RE: and so ...
by zima on Fri 13th Jan 2012 02:26 UTC in reply to "and so ..."
zima Member since:
2005-07-06

"This" still quite possibly hardly happened. The news piece talks only about one atypical market (just very loud & visible in general, and one which you might perceive almost exclusively in particular)

Reply Score: 2