Linked by Elv13 on Sun 26th Feb 2012 21:03 UTC
PDAs, Cellphones, Wireless "Don't expect RIM to open source its entire operating system, or its radio stack. But the original smartphone company is gambling its future success on open source, and it has an expert on board to help. Mary Branscombe asked Senior Technical Director for Open Software, Eduardo Pelegri Llopart, where open source fits in at RIM."
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No
by ephracis on Sun 26th Feb 2012 21:19 UTC
ephracis
Member since:
2007-09-23

No, things are not that simple.

Reply Score: 7

Comment by Brynet
by brynet on Sun 26th Feb 2012 21:33 UTC
brynet
Member since:
2010-03-02

QNX6 did have source available, until they closed it up again after being acquired by RIM.

Some parts are still on the Foundry27 site, but not the kernel or userland.

Reply Score: 2

RE: Comment by Brynet
by fithisux on Tue 28th Feb 2012 08:34 UTC in reply to "Comment by Brynet"
fithisux Member since:
2006-01-22

And for PC users the availability of QNX (even the ability to write apps/drivers) is very difficult.

Why they make usage from PC users so difficult?

IMHO it has strongly contributed. People would buy MS-Phones because the OS is familiar.

Reply Score: 2

Qt
by vivainio on Sun 26th Feb 2012 21:47 UTC
vivainio
Member since:
2008-12-26

The most interesting stuff is the Qt snippet:

"The Cascades 3D graphics framework uses Qt Core, and QML (the Qt Modelling Language) to give PlayBook 2 and BlackBerry 10 apps a new signature look."

I don't actually know if this information has been officially stated anywhere before. Using QML, RIM could create an absolutely competitive user experience, on par with iOS and WP7 (on framerate and fluidity), and easily exceeding Android UX.

And this is something that will get much better on Qt5, when the graphics model becomes more directly GPU accelerateable (ok, that's not a real word).

Reply Score: 9

RE: Qt
by cdude on Mon 27th Feb 2012 03:10 UTC in reply to "Qt"
cdude Member since:
2008-09-21

And once that absolutely competitive user experience is there and short before hitting the market like a bomb Microsoft comes along, partners with RIM, the absolutely competitive user experience is dead before released and RIM loses half it's merit in just some months?

Reply Score: 5

RE: Qt
by anda_skoa on Mon 27th Feb 2012 10:14 UTC in reply to "Qt"
anda_skoa Member since:
2005-07-07

The most interesting stuff is the Qt snippet:

"The Cascades 3D graphics framework uses Qt Core, and QML (the Qt Modelling Language) to give PlayBook 2 and BlackBerry 10 apps a new signature look."

I don't actually know if this information has been officially stated anywhere before.


It was part of the BlackBerry DevCon key note by Alec Saunders
http://www.blackberrydevcon.com/europe/webcast (Qt part beginning at about 41:15, including a demo of QtQuick on the Playbook by Lars Knoll)

And this is something that will get much better on Qt5, when the graphics model becomes more directly GPU accelerateable (ok, that's not a real word).


I believe that RIM's QML-using framework Cascades referred to in the article is already using an OpenGL ES scene graph for rendering.

Reply Score: 3

RE[2]: Qt
by vivainio on Mon 27th Feb 2012 11:49 UTC in reply to "RE: Qt"
vivainio Member since:
2008-12-26


I believe that RIM's QML-using framework Cascades referred to in the article is already using an OpenGL ES scene graph for rendering.


Cool, thanks for the info! Also Intel was planning to retrofit the Scene Graph for Qt 4.8, before butchering MeeGo.

Reply Score: 2

no
by fran on Sun 26th Feb 2012 22:06 UTC
fran
Member since:
2010-08-06

RIM has a terrific product in the Playbook.
If RIM fails it will be down to the economy i think.
Open source is not right for RIM. Reason is black berry services on it's own will not sustain the company in it's current form.
It does not make any other products like HP.
It does not have a advertising business model like Google.
Who will maintain the backend of Blackberry services with so much open source devices from other manufacturers floating around. Will it bring an inconsistent experience? Will you have to charge for it? Or just let that part go.
You can't compete with Asian manufacturers.
Open source will only be a RIM deathbed option whereby the companies revenue is so reduced that it can actually make money from third party manufacturers using Blackberry services and licensing patents.

Edited 2012-02-26 22:08 UTC

Reply Score: 3

RE: no
by cdude on Mon 27th Feb 2012 03:58 UTC in reply to "no"
cdude Member since:
2008-09-21

It's very unlikely that they will do nothing but Blackberry mail services for something that targets the consumer-market.

That free and libre Software and making money out of it does not exclude each other was proven last but not last by the market-leader Android. Also its not all black or white. You can combine both worlds like its also done on Android (yes, you can pay for apps even there and they are making money with that!).

Reply Score: 2

Comment by orestes
by orestes on Mon 27th Feb 2012 00:29 UTC
orestes
Member since:
2005-07-06

RIM's a lot like Nokia at this point. The only thing that'll save them is more proactive management and a clear, well defined business plan to regain and expand their target market.

Can open source be a vital part of that? Maybe. It has to be done properly though, as part of a committed effort with a clear business aim or else they're just shooting themselves in the foot again.

Reply Score: 1

RE: Comment by orestes
by cdude on Mon 27th Feb 2012 03:46 UTC in reply to "Comment by orestes"
cdude Member since:
2008-09-21

Its "the only thing" that makes the difference. If the management keeps the course and makes there next products attractive for developers - so lot of interesting applications for users are produced - and for users - look, feel, price and marketing - then they may indeed offer something selling well.

Reply Score: 1

Reverend Lovejoy
by stabbyjones on Mon 27th Feb 2012 06:01 UTC
stabbyjones
Member since:
2008-04-15

short answer: "Yes" with an "If," long answer: "No" -- with a "But."

There's probably not a lot that will help RIM. It will help the software that they open up more than their profit margins.

Reply Score: 2

Comment by PieterGen
by PieterGen on Mon 27th Feb 2012 14:34 UTC
PieterGen
Member since:
2012-01-13

Why would a developer spend time working on open parts of the RIM software?

There are plenty open source projects to work on that DO have the right open source culture. Why spend your energy on RIM ?

Reply Score: 2

Short answer:
by tidux on Mon 27th Feb 2012 15:50 UTC
tidux
Member since:
2011-08-13
RE: Short answer:
by PieterGen on Tue 28th Feb 2012 12:17 UTC in reply to "Short answer:"
PieterGen Member since:
2012-01-13

LOL

Reply Score: 1

Closed servers
by bert64 on Mon 27th Feb 2012 20:29 UTC
bert64
Member since:
2007-04-23

What put me off buying a blackberry handset was the requirement to use their closed source server, which also depends on other third party closed source software...
By contrast, i can use an iphone or android device with open source backend servers, either standard imap or an open implementation of activesync such as z-push.
If RIM had an open source backend server, which could talk to open source mail/groupware servers, then i might have considered one of their handsets.

Reply Score: 3

Skip ahead
by franksands on Mon 27th Feb 2012 21:23 UTC
franksands
Member since:
2009-08-18

RIM is in step 3 of the "things that didn't work out" list:

1. Launch ground breaking revolucionary new thing
2. Deny that it is not working
3. Try to open source it
4. Donate to the Apache project and declare it as dead.

Edited 2012-02-27 21:24 UTC

Reply Score: 3

RE: Skip ahead
by ThomasFuhringer on Tue 28th Feb 2012 08:27 UTC in reply to "Skip ahead"
ThomasFuhringer Member since:
2007-01-25

"I am sorry, our project was a failure. We had to open source it."

Reply Score: 0