Linked by Thom Holwerda on Mon 16th Apr 2012 20:56 UTC
Legal "Abstract ideas, laws of nature, and mathematical formulas can't be patented under US law, and both Google and Verizon want the US Supreme Court to better define the bounds of that legal tenet as it applies to Internet technologies. Google and Verizon recently filed a joint amicus curiae brief in the case of WildTangent v. Ultramercial, asking America's highest court to formally clarify that an unpatentable abstract idea, such as a method of advertising, can't magically become patentable subject matter by simply implementing it over the Internet. The Electronic Frontier Foundation has also filed an amicus brief in the case similarly asking the court to assign understandable boundaries to patentable subject matter." This should be fun.
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Good Luck
by jburnett on Tue 17th Apr 2012 03:57 UTC
jburnett
Member since:
2012-03-29

Courts hate clarifying something when glossing over it will work.

Reply Score: 1

RE: Good Luck
by l3v1 on Tue 17th Apr 2012 06:25 UTC in reply to "Good Luck"
l3v1 Member since:
2005-07-06

Also, if everything would be clear, the courts would have much less work to do.

Reply Score: 2

RE[2]: Good Luck
by shmerl on Tue 17th Apr 2012 16:29 UTC in reply to "RE: Good Luck"
shmerl Member since:
2010-06-08

Courts don't mind that. But lawyers do.

Reply Score: 2

This won't work
by Neolander on Tue 17th Apr 2012 07:10 UTC
Neolander
Member since:
2010-03-08

The only way to stop patent trolls is to sneak patents on patent trolling at the USPTO.

It won't necessarily work, but at worst you may still get some easy money anytime someone patents GUI concepts or smileys ;)

Edited 2012-04-17 07:12 UTC

Reply Score: 1

RE: This won't work
by shmerl on Tue 17th Apr 2012 16:31 UTC in reply to "This won't work"
shmerl Member since:
2010-06-08

Can you patent such an ancient idea as racket?-) That what patent trolling boils down to. So they'd reject it because of the prior art ;)

Reply Score: 2

RE[2]: This won't work
by Neolander on Tue 17th Apr 2012 17:13 UTC in reply to "RE: This won't work"
Neolander Member since:
2010-03-08

Well, judges don't care about prior art when it's about scrolling in a GUI, why would they care when it's about racket ? ;)

Reply Score: 1