Linked by Thom Holwerda on Tue 24th Apr 2012 20:56 UTC
Apple Another solid quarter for Apple. "The Company sold 35.1 million iPhones in the quarter, representing 88 percent unit growth over the year-ago quarter. Apple sold 11.8 million iPads during the quarter, a 151 percent unit increase over the year-ago quarter. The Company sold 4 million Macs during the quarter, a 7 percent unit increase over the year-ago quarter. Apple sold 7.7 million iPods, a 15 percent unit decline from the year-ago quarter." The official Apple Money Pile: $110 billion. That's where those 47% profit margins you pay go to!
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Solid leadership
by sirspudd on Tue 24th Apr 2012 21:43 UTC
sirspudd
Member since:
2010-10-13

I am a Linux fanboy, but I can't advise anyone I love against mac products. Any of them.

Android 4 (on my Galaxy S II) is nice enough that I feel no Apple lust. Apple laptop hardware is still singularly glorious, and the price difference is negligible. Touch pads are a bugger to use under Linux though, at least they are the way I have configured them.

Reply Score: 2

RE: Solid leadership
by Thom_Holwerda on Tue 24th Apr 2012 21:49 UTC in reply to "Solid leadership"
Thom_Holwerda Member since:
2005-06-29

Touch pads are a bugger to use under Linux though, at least they are the way I have configured them.


Tell me about it. Linux doesn't even *recognise* the Sentelic touchpad on my ZenBook (only as a regular ps/2 mouse).

Reply Score: 1

RE[2]: Solid leadership
by Sodki on Wed 25th Apr 2012 10:25 UTC in reply to "RE: Solid leadership"
Sodki Member since:
2005-11-10

Tell me about it. Linux doesn't even *recognise* the Sentelic touchpad on my ZenBook (only as a regular ps/2 mouse).


Hopefully that won't be a problem in the near future. Kernel 3.2, that will be available on the new Ubuntu tomorrow, will support my work laptop's trackpad and, if I'm not mistaken, your. Rolling-release distributions have this problem solved for months now.

Reply Score: 2

RE[3]: Solid leadership
by Thom_Holwerda on Wed 25th Apr 2012 10:35 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Solid leadership"
Thom_Holwerda Member since:
2005-06-29

"Tell me about it. Linux doesn't even *recognise* the Sentelic touchpad on my ZenBook (only as a regular ps/2 mouse).


Hopefully that won't be a problem in the near future. Kernel 3.2, that will be available on the new Ubuntu tomorrow, will support my work laptop's trackpad and, if I'm not mistaken, your. Rolling-release distributions have this problem solved for months now.
"

Ooh that would be quite welcome. I have Ubuntu 12.04 running right now (the beta or RC or whatever it was), but it's not on 3.2 yet.

Reply Score: 1

RE[4]: Solid leadership
by Underphil on Wed 25th Apr 2012 16:14 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: Solid leadership"
Underphil Member since:
2012-01-13

I've got a 2008 Macbook, and Ubuntu 11.10 support for the touchpad is really poor. I've hacked away at it for hours using forums & knowledgebase for support but it's still a real horrible thing to use.

OS X on the same machine gives perfect control over the pointer. It's a damn shame.

Edited 2012-04-25 16:14 UTC

Reply Score: 1

RE[4]: Solid leadership
by Thom_Holwerda on Wed 25th Apr 2012 16:31 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: Solid leadership"
Thom_Holwerda Member since:
2005-06-29

No good. Supposedly 3.3 works... Which won't be in Ubuntu for a while. Ugh.

Reply Score: 1

RE: Solid leadership
by Carewolf on Wed 25th Apr 2012 08:11 UTC in reply to "Solid leadership"
Carewolf Member since:
2005-09-08

Depends on who your loved ones are ;)

I can not advise non-tech users against Apple products, but I can advise them against Apple itself. It also seems like most are already starting to be pretty suspicious of Apple without nerd advise.

But for people with similar requirements as me, there are many things wrong with Apple products that just makes them useless or simply overprices toys.

Edited 2012-04-25 08:19 UTC

Reply Score: 3

RE[2]: Solid leadership
by parrotjoe on Wed 25th Apr 2012 22:34 UTC in reply to "RE: Solid leadership"
parrotjoe Member since:
2005-07-06

Could you expand on that...what are your requirements?

Reply Score: 1

From my perspective...
by bloodline on Tue 24th Apr 2012 22:04 UTC
bloodline
Member since:
2008-07-28

As an Amiga refugee, it's somewhat comforting to know my chosen technology provider won't keel over and die any time soon ;) I guess that's what one pays the premium for ;)

Reply Score: 5

Well done Apple
by Hussein on Tue 24th Apr 2012 23:23 UTC
Hussein
Member since:
2008-11-22

Despite all the analysts that predicted that Apple will fail, that the Mac market has peaked, that no one wants an iPad and that iOS stands no chance against Android.

Reply Score: 1

RE: Well done Apple
by TechGeek on Wed 25th Apr 2012 00:41 UTC in reply to "Well done Apple"
TechGeek Member since:
2006-01-14

Disclaimer: I hate Apple.

That aside, the idea that the will be replaced is born out of pure economics. There is just too much money for someone not to come along and do what Apple does, only better. That or they will become popular enough (seeing a lot of this lately) that they will be targeted by all the malicious software makers. While Apple may lock down its store, you still sync your devices to either a PC or a Mac. They still sit out on wireless most of the time. They make a really good target. And Apple has a really bad history with security.

Reply Score: 2

RE[2]: Well done Apple
by fretinator on Thu 26th Apr 2012 17:29 UTC in reply to "RE: Well done Apple"
fretinator Member since:
2005-07-06

Disclaimer: I hate Apple. That aside, the idea that the will be replaced is born out of pure economics. There is just too much money for someone not to come along and do what Apple does, only better.

Except that what Apple does is sell shiny products as a premium price. Part of the transaction involves status. For someone to come along and sell similar products at a lower price does not work - the user loses the status factor. I don't think anyone will be challenging Apple in the premium device section any time soon. Someone will have to come along and be able to "out-status" them. It will happen, but I can't think of a current company that can do that.

Reply Score: 2

With all that profit
by drcoldfoot on Tue 24th Apr 2012 23:47 UTC
drcoldfoot
Member since:
2006-08-25

Where's the stockholder's dividends?

Reply Score: 1

RE: With all that profit
by bloodline on Tue 24th Apr 2012 23:51 UTC in reply to "With all that profit"
bloodline Member since:
2008-07-28

Where's the stockholder's dividends?


I think Tim Cook said they will be paying about $2.50 per share in June... So just be patient ;)

Edited 2012-04-24 23:52 UTC

Reply Score: 3

RE: With all that profit
by mkone on Wed 25th Apr 2012 00:38 UTC in reply to "With all that profit"
mkone Member since:
2006-03-14

Do you have shares?

Reply Score: 2

v Sales?
by Lorin on Wed 25th Apr 2012 02:58 UTC
RE: Sales?
by testman on Wed 25th Apr 2012 05:39 UTC in reply to "Sales?"
testman Member since:
2007-10-15

People are looking at them on display, but are signing up for the new HTC OneXs' and Samsung Notes.

Cool story bro. Here's another anecdote for you: I visited China for business less than a week ago. I more brand-spanking new iPhones and iPads than anything else. Nearly everyone from managers to staff had one; even the courier had one!

From New York Times, April 24, 2012:

Mr. Cook said that Apple’s quarterly revenue from China was $7.9 billion, about 20 percent of total company revenue. Furthermore, that was triple Apple’s China sales in the same period a year ago.

That's a lot of shipped units for a country that is supposedly more interested in HTCs and Samsung Notes.

Reply Score: 2

RE[2]: Sales?
by kwan_e on Wed 25th Apr 2012 07:03 UTC in reply to "RE: Sales?"
kwan_e Member since:
2007-02-18

"Mr. Cook said that Apple’s quarterly revenue from China was $7.9 billion, about 20 percent of total company revenue. Furthermore, that was triple Apple’s China sales in the same period a year ago.

That's a lot of shipped units for a country that is supposedly more interested in HTCs and Samsung Notes.
"

The interesting figures would be how much of them were first time purchases, and how many of them were switches from one to the other. I find it highly amusing with all the voodoo reasoning surrounding sales figures. The numbers are too opaque (we don't know what different kinds of sales they are composed of) to make any meaningful prediction about how these quarterly sales figures would contribute to the next quarter, or even the next two years.

Unlike the West, the Chinese don't have any concept of brand loyalty. Value for money is the only thing that matters to the average Chinese. Let's wait until Apple's customer service reputation becomes properly embedded in people's minds and watch their decisions when they make their next purchase.

Reply Score: 2

RE[3]: Sales?
by Thom_Holwerda on Wed 25th Apr 2012 08:17 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Sales?"
Thom_Holwerda Member since:
2005-06-29

Android is obliterating iOS in China.

Google Inc's Android mobile operating system (OS) was the top smartphone platform in China last year, growing its market share by about 35 percent in the world's largest market for mobile phones, a Chinese technology research firm said.

At the end of 2011, Android had 68.4 percent of the smartphone OS market by the number of smartphones sold, up from 33.6 percent at the end of the first quarter of last year, Beijing-based research firm Analysys International said in a report on Tuesday.

The cementing of Android's dominance in China came at the expense of Finnish mobile phone maker Nokia whose Symbian OS saw its market share more than halve to 18.7 percent last year.

Apple Inc, whose iPhones are seeing strong demand from wealthier Chinese cities, posted a modest growth in 2011, with the market share of its iOs operating system rising from 4.1 percent in the first quarter to 5.7 percent at the end of the fourth quarter.


http://www.reuters.com/article/2012/04/10/net-us-android-apple-idUS...

Edited 2012-04-25 08:17 UTC

Reply Score: 2

Comment by Radio
by Radio on Wed 25th Apr 2012 06:25 UTC
Radio
Member since:
2009-06-20

It would have been fun to put this article in the post:
http://www.guardian.co.uk/technology/2012/apr/23/bad-apple-employ-m...

Reply Score: 2

RE: Comment by Radio
by MOS6510 on Wed 25th Apr 2012 10:30 UTC in reply to "Comment by Radio"
MOS6510 Member since:
2011-05-12

The article doesn't mention natural resources. A lot of which Apple needs originates from China.

It would cost a lot more to transport all that to the US to assemble their hardware there.

Reply Score: 1

RE[2]: Comment by Radio
by Radio on Wed 25th Apr 2012 11:02 UTC in reply to "RE: Comment by Radio"
Radio Member since:
2009-06-20

Not really. The only ressources really tied to China are the rare earth elements, and only traces are needed. In volume (which is the relevant parameter here, as transportation costs scales mostly with weight/volume), most of what makes an iPhone is metal (which the US produces already a lot) and gorilla glass (which was invented by an american company, Corning, which had to migrate to China to put its factories next to Foxconn. Apple actively pushed a major american subcontractor to offshore its production).

Here is a 7-pages article to drive the point home: http://www.nytimes.com/2012/01/22/business/apple-america-and-a-sque...

The impact of such advantages became obvious as soon as Mr. Jobs demanded glass screens in 2007.

For years, cellphone makers had avoided using glass because it required precision in cutting and grinding that was extremely difficult to achieve. Apple had already selected an American company, Corning Inc., to manufacture large panes of strengthened glass. But figuring out how to cut those panes into millions of iPhone screens required finding an empty cutting plant, hundreds of pieces of glass to use in experiments and an army of midlevel engineers. It would cost a fortune simply to prepare.

Then a bid for the work arrived from a Chinese factory.

When an Apple team visited, the Chinese plant’s owners were already constructing a new wing. “This is in case you give us the contract,” the manager said, according to a former Apple executive. The Chinese government had agreed to underwrite costs for numerous industries, and those subsidies had trickled down to the glass-cutting factory. It had a warehouse filled with glass samples available to Apple, free of charge. The owners made engineers available at almost no cost. They had built on-site dormitories so employees would be available 24 hours a day.

The Chinese plant got the job.

[...]

Corning was founded in America 161 years ago and its headquarters are still in upstate New York. Theoretically, the company could manufacture all its glass domestically. But it would “require a total overhaul in how the industry is structured,” Mr. Flaws said. “The consumer electronics business has become an Asian business. As an American, I worry about that, but there’s nothing I can do to stop it. Asia has become what the U.S. was for the last 40 years.”


Here you go: massive government intervention ready to lend (or banks ready to do the same thing, like what could be seen in South Korea and Singapore). Exactly what the Very Important People tell us is very very inefficient, or refuse to do in order to get the only metric they care for (the ROI) as high as unsustainably possible.

All the other reasons given by Apple managers should be taken with a grain of salt: you can organize a logistic as excellent in the USA, and you can find as many skilled workers.

“We shouldn’t be criticized for using Chinese workers,” a current Apple executive said. “The U.S. has stopped producing people with the skills we need.”


The reality distortion field is working at full power.

Reply Score: 3

RE[3]: Comment by Radio
by kwan_e on Wed 25th Apr 2012 11:59 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Comment by Radio"
kwan_e Member since:
2007-02-18

"“We shouldn’t be criticized for using Chinese workers,” a current Apple executive said. “The U.S. has stopped producing people with the skills we need.”


The reality distortion field is working at full power.
"

Just wait until a disgruntled Chinese factory worker snaps and runs to the front of the assembly lines and smashes the talking face of Steve Jobs with a hammer.

Reply Score: 2

RE[2]: Comment by Radio
by Soulbender on Wed 25th Apr 2012 12:40 UTC in reply to "RE: Comment by Radio"
Soulbender Member since:
2005-08-18

The article doesn't mention natural resources. A lot of which Apple needs originates from China.


Of all the lame excuses this must be one of the worst. Natural resources?
Well, yeah, if you consider labor a natural resource...

Reply Score: 2

RE[4]: Comment by Radio
by kwan_e on Wed 25th Apr 2012 13:15 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: Comment by Radio"
kwan_e Member since:
2007-02-18



Except the USA also has abundant sources of rare earth elements. The jobs and economic output that would result from having actually mine the minerals and from developing environmentally safe methods of extracting the minerals would be significant.

Reply Score: 2

RE[5]: Comment by Radio
by MOS6510 on Wed 25th Apr 2012 13:32 UTC in reply to "RE[4]: Comment by Radio"
MOS6510 Member since:
2011-05-12

I'm not doubting that, just wondering why nobody has set up a mining installation up yet.

Considering the booming phone and tablet market one should expect to make some money from a heavy demand of rare materials.

Reply Score: 2

RE[6]: Comment by Radio
by kwan_e on Wed 25th Apr 2012 14:38 UTC in reply to "RE[5]: Comment by Radio"
kwan_e Member since:
2007-02-18

I'm not doubting that, just wondering why nobody has set up a mining installation up yet.


Maybe mining companies can't find the skilled workers they need? Seems to be acceptable excuse.

Reply Score: 2

RE[7]: Comment by Radio
by MOS6510 on Wed 25th Apr 2012 14:40 UTC in reply to "RE[6]: Comment by Radio"
MOS6510 Member since:
2011-05-12

Does sound simpler than mining astroids!

Reply Score: 2

RE[4]: Comment by Radio
by Neolander on Thu 26th Apr 2012 07:04 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: Comment by Radio"
Neolander Member since:
2010-03-08

Actually, could someone who's more knowledgeable about the electronics industry tell me WHY they need so much of those rare-earth elements ?

If I refer to Wikipedia's list ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rare-earth ), the only one which I believe is commonly used in consumer products is neodymium, because one can manufacture powerful magnets with it.

Why would traditional electronics require something else than Si, Ga, and As, plus B and P for doping, cheap plastics for component cases, and Cu and Au for wires ? Okay, coming from Apple, I guess that there is also an absolute need for Al and "gorilla glass" also, but AFAIK the latter doesn't contain rare-earth material.

What am I missing ? Batteries ?

Edited 2012-04-26 07:09 UTC

Reply Score: 1

RE[5]: Comment by Radio
by kwan_e on Thu 26th Apr 2012 08:38 UTC in reply to "RE[4]: Comment by Radio"
kwan_e Member since:
2007-02-18

If I refer to Wikipedia's list ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rare-earth ), the only one which I believe is commonly used in consumer products is neodymium, because one can manufacture powerful magnets with it.


Well, that same list says neodymium is also used for ceramic capacitors, which " are suitable for moderately high-frequency work ... as modern ceramic caps are fairly non-inductive compared to the other major classes of capacitors".

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ceramic_capacitor

Reply Score: 3

RE[6]: Comment by Radio
by Neolander on Thu 26th Apr 2012 08:54 UTC in reply to "RE[5]: Comment by Radio"
Neolander Member since:
2010-03-08

Indeed, that could be a good track. I did not find why they need to use Nd specifically, but I guess that's some kind of trade secret. Thanks !

Reply Score: 1

Down Nokia
by Tractor on Wed 25th Apr 2012 10:10 UTC
Tractor
Member since:
2006-08-18

All these excellent results, from Samsung and Apple, come primarily from the massive retraction of Nokia market share, due to Elop's decision to Osborne its own product line by calling it publicly a "burning platform", and then announcing its death without even a solid backup solution in place
Just look at how much Nokia has lost in a single year !
And now, give this market share to its stronger rivals. This makes for outstanding results.

Many thanks Elop for destroying a European company so effectively, in the tiny (and failed) hope to marginally improve the perspective of a US-based one.

Reply Score: 1

Comment by leos
by leos on Wed 25th Apr 2012 21:36 UTC
leos
Member since:
2005-09-21

Clearly, everyone wants larger screens.

Thanks Apple. I like your products and your shares are highly profitable.

Edited 2012-04-25 21:38 UTC

Reply Score: 2