Linked by Thom Holwerda on Thu 26th Apr 2012 19:28 UTC
Apple Steve Jobs once considered an ad-supported version of Mac OS 9. Users would see a 60-second Apple-updated commercial during boot, as well as several other ads throughout the system. This all was tied to selling operating system updates - "this is how Microsoft does it... It's like printing money", Jobs said. While the idea was financially sound, Apple decided against it because too many negatives arose.
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Pretty dumb.
by Bill Shooter of Bul on Thu 26th Apr 2012 19:59 UTC
Bill Shooter of Bul
Member since:
2006-07-14

In the age of Mac OS9 most people were lucky to have 33.6 kb modems. Remotely updating video ads? That's so ridiculously bad of an idea.

But Jobs was right about the updates, not many people I knew were using the latest version of Mac OS. Keeping up with the changes in the os version were tough as a newbie mac programmer and maintaining separate versions was a double pain.

Reply Score: 4

Good idea
by fretinator on Thu 26th Apr 2012 20:52 UTC
fretinator
Member since:
2005-07-06

That sounds like a very [Crest Toothpaste - for that, smooth, sexy smile that says, "I just passed gas"!] good idea. It would have at least been [Rexson - when you're ready for more than just Yahtzee. Side effects may include boredom, itching, diarrhea and smelly toes.] worth a try.

Reply Score: 4

RE: Good idea
by aaronb on Thu 26th Apr 2012 21:55 UTC in reply to "Good idea"
aaronb Member since:
2005-07-06

I [Got a rash that will not go away... Zarvirax!] agree. However it could lead to invasive [Free prostrate checks of over 50s] targeted adds based on [Ozonate! get rid of that lingering odour] how the computer is used.

I would love to [last longer with rumptonix] hear other view points.

Reply Score: 3

banned from the os9 store
by sPAZbEAT on Sun 29th Apr 2012 11:42 UTC in reply to "Good idea"
sPAZbEAT Member since:
2009-07-17

[expletive del=deleted]Because you love Microsoft office, [u]you'll love Windows Millennium Edition[/u]! [/expletive]

Reply Score: 1

Negatives?
by Macrat on Thu 26th Apr 2012 21:37 UTC
Macrat
Member since:
2006-03-27

"While the idea was financially sound, Apple decided against it because too many negatives arose."

Like Mac users traveling to Cupertino to burn down the campus.

Reply Score: 3

RE: Negatives?
by WorknMan on Thu 26th Apr 2012 21:47 UTC in reply to "Negatives?"
WorknMan Member since:
2005-11-13

I would expect MS to try pulling off something like this before Apple. In fact, I'm surprised they haven't already. (Or maybe they did and I just missed it.) I mean, hell... if they did it like their Xbox Live service, they would charge full price for it and STILL show people ads.

Edited 2012-04-26 21:48 UTC

Reply Score: 2

RE[2]: Negatives?
by jptros on Thu 26th Apr 2012 22:22 UTC in reply to "RE: Negatives?"
jptros Member since:
2005-08-26

There's a version of office that has an advertisement area in the startup pane:

http://i.zdnet.com/blogs/office-starter-2010-with-sidebar.jpg

Reply Score: 2

RE[2]: Negatives?
by zima on Thu 26th Apr 2012 22:52 UTC in reply to "RE: Negatives?"
zima Member since:
2005-07-06

"Ads in OS" is sort of here, also in an Apple OS (isn't that what iAd is about? http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IAd ...even if intrudes less - not when you just interact with the OS)

Reply Score: 2

RE[3]: Negatives?
by WorknMan on Fri 27th Apr 2012 03:34 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Negatives?"
WorknMan Member since:
2005-11-13

Well, no... not really. iAd is more of an API for applications. And to be honest, it's a huge improvement over the Windows model, where every 'free' app you install wants to install it's own browser toolbar.

Reply Score: 3

RE[4]: Negatives?
by bassbeast on Fri 27th Apr 2012 05:52 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: Negatives?"
bassbeast Member since:
2007-11-11

And whose fault is that? People that are either too lazy or too...well stupid, to even bother to read what a program says, in clear text with checkboxes no less, before they install software onto their system that could be doing anything! Frankly I'm shocked more programmers haven't stuck jokes in the EULAs, like "We get the right to name your first born children and drink all your beer" just because they know nobody even bothers to read or check anything anymore!

BTW if you have friends and or relatives like this? you might want to know of a place called http://ninite.com/ which will install most of the software your average user wants/needs with NO TOOLBARS and in fact no questions, just check the boxes of what you want and run it.

As for TFA you have to remember the era, we are talking OS9, an OS that was woefully behind the times and was basically shoved out the doors to buy them time to get OSX complete. Thanks to the Pepsi guy betting the farm on the lawsuit, followed by the next CEOs letting Pink/Copeland/Taligent get so bloated and messed up the only solution was to buy another OS? Well you can see why anything that would bring more revenue might have been entertained.

Reply Score: 3

RE[5]: Negatives?
by WorknMan on Sat 28th Apr 2012 21:52 UTC in reply to "RE[4]: Negatives?"
WorknMan Member since:
2005-11-13

And whose fault is that? People that are either too lazy or too...well stupid, to even bother to read what a program says, in clear text with checkboxes no less, before they install software onto their system that could be doing anything!


I think you're missing the point. Look, I'm not a fan of ads at all, but it's clear that some people don't mind them in exchange for a 'free' app, as they'd rather have apps and other things take a shit in their eyes to save 2 or 3 bucks. To that end, I think it's better to have the API for this stuff built into the OS, instead of each app installing its own crap. It's kind of like having a centralized update system built into the OS, vs every app that wants to try and update itself, half of the time by installing some 'agent' to run in the task bar.

BTW: I appreciate the link... never heard of that site ;)

Reply Score: 2

RE[4]: Negatives?
by MOS6510 on Fri 27th Apr 2012 10:51 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: Negatives?"
MOS6510 Member since:
2011-05-12

Browser toolbars are great. They offer a simple and sure way to fix broken computers: just deinstall them and the computer works again.

I have made a couple of people happy doing this.

Reply Score: 4

Steve was a leeeetle confused
by BallmerKnowsBest on Fri 27th Apr 2012 16:24 UTC
BallmerKnowsBest
Member since:
2008-06-02

"this is how Microsoft does it... It's like printing money", Jobs said.


So, in other words, Stevie couldn't distinguish between Microsoft and the likes of All Advantage or eMachines (their first incarnation).

Reply Score: 2