Linked by Thom Holwerda on Wed 9th May 2012 22:30 UTC
Multimedia, AV "Will the two screens be shown back to back? Will each screen last for 10 seconds each? Will each screen be unskippable? Yes, yes, and yes. An ICE spokesman tells me that the two screens will 'come up after the previews, once you hit the main movie/play button on the DVD. At which point the movie rating comes up, followed by the IPR Center screen shot for 10 secs and then the FBI/HSI anti-piracy warning for 10 secs as well. Neither can be skipped/fast forwarded through.'" That'll surely teach the pirates who don't buy DVDs or Blu-rays.
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Comment by shmerl
by shmerl on Wed 9th May 2012 22:36 UTC
shmerl
Member since:
2010-06-08

What's so unskippable there? Rip the DVD into file, and skip all you want. Isn't it the normal way if one wants to watch it on the tablet anyway? Unless you prefer to mount external DVD readers ;)

Edited 2012-05-09 22:37 UTC

Reply Score: 4

RE: Comment by shmerl
by bowkota on Wed 9th May 2012 22:47 UTC in reply to "Comment by shmerl"
bowkota Member since:
2011-10-12

If you're buying DVDs to encode them and then transfer them to watch on a tablet, you're doing it wrong.

Reply Score: 1

RE[2]: Comment by shmerl
by Soulbender on Wed 9th May 2012 22:58 UTC in reply to "RE: Comment by shmerl"
Soulbender Member since:
2005-08-18

With this new scheme it is obviously the right way of doing it.

Reply Score: 6

RE[2]: Comment by shmerl
by shmerl on Thu 10th May 2012 00:28 UTC in reply to "RE: Comment by shmerl"
shmerl Member since:
2010-06-08

What is the right way then? Can you easily buy files without all those petty DRM blockers?

Reply Score: 3

RE[3]: Comment by shmerl
by phoudoin on Thu 10th May 2012 09:37 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Comment by shmerl"
phoudoin Member since:
2006-06-09

There is no "right way" anymore.
They voluntary degraded the right way experience to a level so low that nobody wants to pay for that.

It's not anymore a right or wrong way situation.
It's a "wrong way or nothing" situation.

Reply Score: 5

RE[2]: Comment by shmerl
by Neolander on Thu 10th May 2012 09:23 UTC in reply to "RE: Comment by shmerl"
Neolander Member since:
2010-03-08

Well, know of a digital movie distribution service that sucks less than the DVD ?

Elements in favor of the latter being : almost every movie exists on the medium, no need to use a credit card or crappy vendor-specific software in order to buy stuff, ease of making backups, no need for an always-on network connection.

I know of nothing legal that beats DVD on all of these fronts myself. Still hope that someone will come up with it one day.

Edited 2012-05-10 09:33 UTC

Reply Score: 5

RE[3]: Comment by shmerl
by shmerl on Thu 10th May 2012 14:55 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Comment by shmerl"
shmerl Member since:
2010-06-08

Exactly. All those who claim that DVDs are going away because on-line services offer media in a more convenient way will have to wait until DRM dies out for their argument to be valid. Who knows how long it will take?

Reply Score: 5

RE: Comment by shmerl
by panzi on Thu 10th May 2012 01:53 UTC in reply to "Comment by shmerl"
panzi Member since:
2006-01-22

I watch DVDs with VLC. Never saw any of these warnings. I don't know how good or if at all VLC supports Blue-Rays. I don't have a Blue-Ray drive anyway.

Reply Score: 3

RE[2]: Comment by shmerl
by shmerl on Thu 10th May 2012 02:18 UTC in reply to "RE: Comment by shmerl"
shmerl Member since:
2010-06-08

I think video "blue-rays" is a totally crippled technology, which isn't supported under Linux. I never used any of those.

Edited 2012-05-10 02:18 UTC

Reply Score: 5

RE[3]: Comment by shmerl
by someone on Thu 10th May 2012 02:31 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Comment by shmerl"
someone Member since:
2006-01-12

Optical discs are on their way out. Windows 8 will remove native support for DVD and BR playback. I am sure Apple's upcoming refresh of the MBPs will also remove optical drives.

Reply Score: 2

RE[2]: Comment by shmerl
by phoudoin on Thu 10th May 2012 09:44 UTC in reply to "RE: Comment by shmerl"
phoudoin Member since:
2006-06-09

I watch DVDs with VLC. Never saw any of these warnings. I don't know how good or if at all VLC supports Blue-Rays. I don't have a Blue-Ray drive anyway.


Indeed, same here.

But for that you needs to enable libdvdcss.so, which is not legal under many coutries laws as it break copy protection and remember that VLC DVD player support is considered illegal also because it doesn't respect the DVD standard, in particular the unskippable feature, the best one according to the industry...

Reply Score: 2

RE[3]: Comment by shmerl
by darknexus on Thu 10th May 2012 12:59 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Comment by shmerl"
darknexus Member since:
2008-07-15

But for that you needs to enable libdvdcss.so, which is not legal under many coutries laws as it break copy protection and remember that VLC DVD player support is considered illegal also because it doesn't respect the DVD standard, in particular the unskippable feature, the best one according to the industry...


Yeah, as if the end users care. If they're willing to download so-called "illegal" copies of movies, do you believe they even think twice about enabling libdvdcss? Hell, VLC already has it enabled in their Windows and Mac binary packages which, let's face it, are the platforms that get the most use. The end users need do nothing other than install VLC, and such an action is far less traceable than downloading from torrent trackers or p2p networks.
I am against copyright infringement in principal, as I do believe that people have the right to be fairly compensated for their efforts. However, these media companies are getting out of hand to say the least and, with copyright almost indefinite in some countries (my own, the US, most of all) and with the ever worstening criminalization of those who actually do pay for this shit, I have absolutely nothing against teaching these bastards a lesson. The worst part of it is that these industry morons can't, or won't, read the writing on the wall. They could tripple their proffits easily by offering a universal, legal, solution that would be even more convenient. It doesn't even have to be DRM-free so long as the DRM is not invasive (I'm thinking iTunes-style DRM, but not limited only to Apple products). Do that, get rid of this idiotic regionalization crap (there are movies I would purchase but can't legally play even if I do), and they'd see downloading drop exponentially within the first months. Pirating media (I hate that word but that's what everyone calls it) is a huge pain in the ass. Most people would gladly pay for a legal solution that would actually work and not get in the way. Personally, I think we just need to remove all the senior execs from these companies and let the new blood take over. These fools don't understand technology. If I were the majority shareholders of these corporate giants, I'd think long and hard about giving control to people who do. </rant>

Reply Score: 3

RE[3]: Comment by shmerl
by shmerl on Thu 10th May 2012 15:02 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Comment by shmerl"
shmerl Member since:
2010-06-08

Shouldn't it be the fair use case? When you paid for the DVD, what do they care if you use libdvdcss to play it? Or may be they know another way to do it in an open source OS without paying anything extra just for the right "to play DVD"? Users didn't choose CSS DRM, it's forced on them by the industry. Obviously if users need to de-CSS it just in order to watch the legally purchased content - they will.

Edited 2012-05-10 15:13 UTC

Reply Score: 3

RE[4]: Comment by shmerl
by phoudoin on Fri 11th May 2012 08:33 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: Comment by shmerl"
phoudoin Member since:
2006-06-09

Agreed, but my point is that doing this is, technically, illegal under several countries's laws.

Sure, nobody care a lot, but if in order to play a DVD under VLC the media content industry tolerates a little law violation, how this same industry can have any credibility calling the law in others cases!?

It's either legal or illegal. They can't cherrypick at will. As some others here stated, this same industry is often found violated copyrights of others, artists for start.

It's the point here: there is no "right way". It's all about calling something wrong to protect a business model, while doing the same when it's good for business model.

When there is no clear right or wrong way, all ways are in a grey zone, aka each side consider their way is legitimate.

Both are obviously wrong, none are right either.

Reply Score: 3

Ripping is not a solution
by phoudoin on Thu 10th May 2012 09:31 UTC in reply to "Comment by shmerl"
phoudoin Member since:
2006-06-09

What's so unskippable there? Rip the DVD into file, and skip all you want. Isn't it the normal way if one wants to watch it on the tablet anyway? Unless you prefer to mount external DVD readers ;)


In more and more countries, even ripping a DVD is illegal as it can't be done without breaking digital copy protection.

Plus, why a customer should first rip a legally bought DVD to have a product that meet again his legit expectation!?
Even more, why a customer will agreed to *have* to do that, when he just can stop buying a product which don't meet anymore his demand!?!

There is a pattern, and this pattern draw a future where staying legal will more and more equal PITA.
They just don't want to listen why their customers becomes ex-customers. It's a lost cause, and nobody will listen them when they will cry after their voluntary painfullest entertainement experience dead business.

Somebodies don't want to learn.

Reply Score: 3

Oh my
by Soulbender on Wed 9th May 2012 22:58 UTC
Soulbender
Member since:
2005-08-18

"Homeland Security Investigations. Special Agent"
Oh my god. That is so...lame. To the max.
How is copyright infringement the business of immigration and customs anyway?

Reply Score: 5

RE: Oh my
by ndrw on Thu 10th May 2012 02:51 UTC in reply to "Oh my"
ndrw Member since:
2009-06-30

I though it is rather obvious. With all the tangible assets moving away, most of the US economy thrives on intelectual property and services.

As weak assets as they are, you can expect politicians to guard them for as long as they can. Yes, that's an extremely stupid and harmful strategy (if only because it limits us, not the Chinese) but who said politicians are smart?

Reply Score: 4

RE[2]: Oh my
by zima on Wed 16th May 2012 23:12 UTC in reply to "RE: Oh my"
zima Member since:
2005-07-06

We collectively choose to promote such smart people to their positions ...ultimately, systems of governance are largely a reflection of societies.

Reply Score: 2

Moaaarrr reasons to be a pirate :)
by drstorm on Wed 9th May 2012 23:24 UTC
drstorm
Member since:
2009-04-24

So it comes down to this:

Watch stupid previews/commercials, have meaningless nonsense shoved down your throat and navigate through the maze of menus each time you want to watch the disc,

-OR-

Just download a pirated copy and enjoy it instantly on any device in a completely no-nonsense manner.

The actual payment for the content becomes almost irrelevant! That said, I would definitely be more eager to pay for the Pirated Copy Experience(tm). It feels like premium. The legal way seems like an ad-supported free version.

Reply Score: 27

jessesmith Member since:
2010-03-11

Not that I support copyright violation, but I do agree with the above post. I stopped buying DVDs because of stuff like this. Terrible menus, unskippable warnings, propaganda about how "piracy is theft". I'd rather not see the movie than pay $20 for that experience. In my case it's not piracy that's costing the movie-makers the sale, it's the terrible product/experience.

Reply Score: 11

jgagnon Member since:
2008-06-24

In my case it's not piracy that's costing the movie-makers the sale, it's the terrible product/experience.


THIS. IF they actually provided a product that people wanted and didn't try to dictate every detail about how they use the product they purchased, THEN they might make some money.

I have a HUGE DVD collection, all purchased legally. I am in the process of transferring them to my computer because it is such a hassle to actually use them the way they are. Sad thing is by doing this I'm probably going to be labeled a thief by them. /boggle

Reply Score: 2

Fergy Member since:
2006-04-10

THIS.

Could you explain to me why that word, a dot and space are there? I keep seeing it on the internet and the only reason I can think of is that the writer is really dumb and thinks it is kind of like an exclamation mark.

Reply Score: 1

jgagnon Member since:
2008-06-24

So let me get this straight, you're faking ignorance to respond to one word out of an entire post that you seem to find idiotic?

Do you know what "/boggle" means?

Reply Score: 3

Fergy Member since:
2006-04-10

So let me get this straight, you're faking ignorance to respond to one word out of an entire post that you seem to find idiotic?

Do you know what "/boggle" means?

https://www.google.com/search?q=%2Fboggle
No but it boggles my mind that you don't care about effective communication when you took the time to comment on an article. You would have liked a response on your comment but instead got a response on the way you communicate.
I would have used the criticism to improve my comments. Not to attack that person.

Reply Score: 1

jgagnon Member since:
2008-06-24

And you are boggling my mind. What part of my comment was at all hard to understand?

Are you seriously suggesting that any use of Internet slang or lingo somehow nullifies an entire post? If that is all someone wants to focus on, then I'm sorry, but the loss is theirs, not mine.

Edited 2012-05-10 20:59 UTC

Reply Score: 3

phoudoin Member since:
2006-06-09

The legal way seems like an ad-supported free version.


Except for the price tag, you're right.

Edited 2012-05-10 09:47 UTC

Reply Score: 3

TooShy Member since:
2011-03-02

And not counting the poor quality of the movies.

The industry has replaced quality by quantity, and wondering why their shares are declining.

Talking about nonsense ? Hum ?

Reply Score: 2

zima Member since:
2005-07-06

Don't mythologise "good old times". There was always plenty of poor quality movies, and only some rare gems (that we just remember best; often overlooked back then, and many still are)

Pretty much like it is now (also with quite a few of mostly ignored gems) ...in fact, it most likely improved over the decades, something most visible with television: relatively few cinematic movies of old days can rival some recent TV series - say, like Game of Thrones, True Blood, BSG, or SG:U.

Edited 2012-05-13 20:18 UTC

Reply Score: 2

totally the wrong audience
by project_2501 on Wed 9th May 2012 23:41 UTC
project_2501
Member since:
2006-03-20

This industry is so on its way out .. it is inconveniencing totally the wrong audience.

For **** sake, I bought the DVD and you're telling me not to steal it? GRRR!

Reply Score: 19

They are
by historyb on Wed 9th May 2012 23:44 UTC
historyb
Member since:
2005-07-06

a bunch of morons

Reply Score: 9

Oh, wait a minute...
by Dekonega on Thu 10th May 2012 00:30 UTC
Dekonega
Member since:
2009-07-28

Didn't they already try this tactic before? And what was the outcome of it? Yeah, if it didn't work the first time the second, and the third, and the fourth, and the fifth and the sixth, and the seventh, and the eighth, and the ninth, will work and if that doesn't work there's always the tenth time and plan B. What's the plan B? Do punch of more stuff which infringes the rights of the consumers who do actually buy this stuff.

Reply Score: 3

what?
by TechGeek on Thu 10th May 2012 00:36 UTC
TechGeek
Member since:
2006-01-14

When the hell did copyright enforcement become a matter of national security?

Reply Score: 13

RE: what?
by shmerl on Thu 10th May 2012 00:54 UTC in reply to "what?"
shmerl Member since:
2010-06-08

When media companies decided that they are essential part of the government.

Reply Score: 9

RE[2]: what?
by phoudoin on Thu 10th May 2012 09:37 UTC in reply to "RE: what?"
phoudoin Member since:
2006-06-09

Since they control part of it?

Reply Score: 2

RE[2]: what?
by dvhh on Thu 10th May 2012 10:30 UTC in reply to "RE: what?"
dvhh Member since:
2006-03-20

Only part of it ?

Waiting for it to happen in others countries.

Reply Score: 2

RE[2]: what?
by zima on Wed 16th May 2012 23:03 UTC in reply to "RE: what?"
zima Member since:
2005-07-06

Well they can make or break govs, more or less, being a major part of modern systems of governance - essential for the government, at the least.

Reply Score: 2

v Civilization
by jefro on Thu 10th May 2012 00:49 UTC
RE: Civilization
by shmerl on Thu 10th May 2012 01:11 UTC in reply to "Civilization"
shmerl Member since:
2010-06-08

The people who do single copies ... take away from the entire country.


You mean personal copies to be able to use the media on different devices, backup copies and etc? Care to elaborate what exactly does it take away from the country? As far as the law goes, it's called fair use.

Edited 2012-05-10 01:12 UTC

Reply Score: 5

RE: Civilization
by TechGeek on Thu 10th May 2012 01:50 UTC in reply to "Civilization"
TechGeek Member since:
2006-01-14

ok, i've had a crappy day so I'll bite. Pls remember, nothing personal.

Who the hell are the media industry to decide what is wrong or right? This is the same industry that actually pirates its own members profits. How many times has the RIAA been sued for not giving artists the money they had coming? This is the same industry that lobbied Congress to get copyright extended to such a point that its ridiculous. Copyright is suppose to have a short shelf life. This is the same industry that layers encryption and other copy control mechanisms onto their media to prevent normal fair use practices, depriving you of property you paid for. This is the same industry that blatantly makes up numbers to incite fear about a loss that while real, probably can't ever be quantified.

What the **AA is doing is wrong. But I don't see you chastising them for it. Its only the pirates that get targeted. Also, do try to remember that copyright infringement is suppose to be a civil matter. Not a matter of national security. How many resources is Homeland Security putting into copyright enforcement that should be going to things like stopping terrorism?

Edited 2012-05-10 01:52 UTC

Reply Score: 5

RE: Civilization
by v_bobok on Thu 10th May 2012 01:52 UTC in reply to "Civilization"
v_bobok Member since:
2008-08-01

I know many people think that stealing movies is not like stealing real money or taking food from babies but it is.


Keep telling yourself that, pal.

Edited 2012-05-10 01:52 UTC

Reply Score: 3

RE: Civilization
by someone on Thu 10th May 2012 02:29 UTC in reply to "Civilization"
someone Member since:
2006-01-12

Unfortunately, any additional revenue obtained by the Movie industry will likely go into the pockets of the well-paid executives, and very rarely trickles down into the paycheques of everyday workers.

Reply Score: 4

RE: Civilization
by Delgarde on Thu 10th May 2012 02:58 UTC in reply to "Civilization"
Delgarde Member since:
2008-08-19

I support the law enforcement community that tries each day to catch crooks.


Fair enough, but think about the steps they're taking. If you're a law-abiding citizen, you pay your money to the recording industry, then before you can watch the DVD you've legally bought, you have to sit through a mandatory lecture on why you shouldn't be a criminal. This is how they treat their paying customers.

Om the other hand, if you're less concerned about legality, you download it at no cost, *and* you don't get the lecture about criminal behavior. Don't you think something's a bit backward here? Why make it harder to be an honest paying customer?

Reply Score: 7

RE: Civilization
by ndrw on Thu 10th May 2012 05:53 UTC in reply to "Civilization"
ndrw Member since:
2009-06-30

Copyright isn't given you (are you an author, btw?) unconditionally - it's a privilege - a limited monopoly for distributing "your" creation for a specified period of time, granted you by the government. Yes, the government went crazy, and so many of the laws it creates, but that's a whole different story.

If not for that legal settings, if you gave your idea/song/book/video to another person, you would immediately stop being its sole owner. That's because the only natural kind of intellectual property is a secret.

Reply Score: 4

RE: Civilization
by spiderman on Thu 10th May 2012 06:22 UTC in reply to "Civilization"
spiderman Member since:
2008-10-23

Actually it's the other way around. There is a mafia that want us to pay for everything we say and do. They are the one stealing from the whole world. Check your rights and wrongs again. In most value system, greed is wrong while sharing is right. I don't know where your moral values come from but they are weird. I suspect they come from brainwash after watching too much propaganda on DVD.

Reply Score: 5

Another reason to download...
by leos on Thu 10th May 2012 01:20 UTC
leos
Member since:
2005-09-21

Downloading doesn't have to be illegal. I still download the occasional movie but only things that I wouldn't bother renting or going to see in the cinema. I agree that pirating movies that you might otherwise pay to see is wrong.

If I want to see a movie I generally rent it on iTunes now. Same price as the video store and I don't have to get off my butt and waste gas twice to go get it and return it. More convenient than torrents, so it's worth the $5 to me.

Most everything else I get from Netflix, and the big movies I go to the cinema for. Never bought a DVD in my life, and now I'm never going to rent one again either. It's a dead medium.

Reply Score: 2

Comment by v_bobok
by v_bobok on Thu 10th May 2012 01:50 UTC
v_bobok
Member since:
2008-08-01

That's why I love pirated movies. No BS at all.

Reply Score: 2

My one big question
by darknexus on Thu 10th May 2012 09:10 UTC
darknexus
Member since:
2008-07-15

Don't these idiots have anything better to do? </rhetorical>

Reply Score: 2

Visual summary fo the problem
by Loreia on Thu 10th May 2012 14:27 UTC
Loreia
Member since:
2012-01-17

It popped on my G+ page yesterday (talk about great timing):

http://tinyurl.com/dxu7drc

(original URL: https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-JI3UJfPMEIo/T6k-mEvWziI/AAAAAAAB3... )

Reply Score: 2

Ahh well!
by Sauron on Thu 10th May 2012 14:41 UTC
Sauron
Member since:
2005-08-02

Time to don the pirate hat and F***K this anti-consumer shit!

Reply Score: 1

Mindboggling incomprehensible
by franksands on Thu 10th May 2012 16:09 UTC
franksands
Member since:
2009-08-18

It really is beyond me to understand why the government is *punishing* the people that still buys legally movies with this increasing BS of FBI warnings and etc.
I mean, really, these are the people that are trying to do the right thing, going to the store and buying the physical DVD and having no way of skipping a scolding of why piracy is bad. This is the same thing of you buying a new car, but when you enter the car, a screen goes down and starts lecturing you on why stealing a car is bad.
As Gabe Newel said[1] "The easiest way to stop piracy is not by putting antipiracy technology to work. It’s by giving those people a service that’s better than what they’re receiving from the pirates."

[1] http://www.geekwire.com/2011/experiments-video-game-economics-valve...

Reply Score: 3

What a waste of time...
by taghi on Fri 11th May 2012 11:40 UTC
taghi
Member since:
2012-05-11

10 seconds/warning * 2 warnings/movie = 20 seconds per movie.

Estimate that each American watches an average of one movie per week. Sure, some watch less (like myself), but others watch many more. Assume the population of the US of "movie watching age" is 250M.

20 seconds/movie * 1 movie/week * 52 weeks/yr * 250M = 7.2M hours/year.

And what does it get us!?

(BTW... it's really scary when you apply this sort of logic to playing video games!)

Reply Score: 1

Last straw!
by mrAmiga500 on Fri 11th May 2012 15:33 UTC
mrAmiga500
Member since:
2009-03-20

That's it! This has pushed me over the edge. I've never pirated a movie, but I'm going to start now!

I've hated those damn FBI warnings for years. I remember before Blu-ray came out, there was mention that new discs would allow people to start movies immediately - meaning no bullshit non-skippable stuff. What the hell happened? Now they're moving in the wrong direction!

As a Canadian, I don't want to be forced to watch stupid FBI, American Homeland Security, flying eagle American patriotic bullshit warnings. Since when did the FBI have jurisdiction over Canadians?? Why should I give a flying f*** over American federal laws? American laws apply only to Americans. Why don't American agencies understand that?

Reply Score: 3

RE: Last straw!
by zima on Sun 13th May 2012 20:09 UTC in reply to "Last straw!"
zima Member since:
2005-07-06

Doesn't it sometimes look like you southern neighbors work hard to have something close to that jurisdiction?

Reply Score: 2