Linked by Thom Holwerda on Sat 19th May 2012 00:01 UTC
Apple "To me, a personal computer should be small, reliable, convenient to use and inexpensive." You'll want to read this: Steve Wozniak's original description of the Apple ][, published in May 1977 in Byte Magazine.
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Sooo slow
by tux68 on Sat 19th May 2012 00:39 UTC
tux68
Member since:
2006-10-24

For any article less interesting I sure as hell wouldn't have waited for those page reloads. It was indeed an entertaining read however and sparked some nostalgia for simpler days. Cheers.

Reply Score: 4

RE: Sooo slow
by Johann Chua on Sat 19th May 2012 03:43 UTC in reply to "Sooo slow"
Johann Chua Member since:
2005-07-22

Yeah. Downloading the PDF was faster.

Reply Score: 4

Revolution in The Valley
by moondevil on Sat 19th May 2012 07:08 UTC
moondevil
Member since:
2005-07-08

Regardless of how one feels about Apple, specially the current one, the way the company come to be is a very interesting story.

The book Revolution in The Valley is full of technical details and private stories, how Apple achieved success
http://shop.oreilly.com/product/9780596007195.do

Reply Score: 4

RE: Revolution in The Valley
by henderson101 on Sat 19th May 2012 12:40 UTC in reply to "Revolution in The Valley"
henderson101 Member since:
2006-05-30

It's a great book and I own it. But most of the content is also available for free here:

http://www.folklore.org/index.py

with the added bonus of a number of insightful additional comments from people that were Apple engineers at the time.

If you're a audiobook nut, a lot of those stories are available read by Derek Warren here:

http://www.macfolkloreradio.com/

Well worth investing some time in.

Reply Score: 4

RE[2]: Revolution in The Valley
by moondevil on Sat 19th May 2012 21:09 UTC in reply to "RE: Revolution in The Valley"
moondevil Member since:
2005-07-08

Thanks for the pointers, I'll have a look into them.

Reply Score: 3

henderson101 Member since:
2006-05-30

There is more content too at te first link. It obviously carried on being a site, even after Andy complied the book.

Reply Score: 2

Interesting 1970s Ad
by matako on Sun 20th May 2012 08:05 UTC
matako
Member since:
2009-02-13

In the linked PDF there is the original "Introducing Apple II" advertisement.

I find it interesting how much it focused on the programming aspect (You can create.. Write simple programs...).

As in: it's a computer - you program it, duh!

Edited 2012-05-20 08:07 UTC

Reply Score: 4

RE: Interesting 1970s Ad
by Hussein on Sun 20th May 2012 18:04 UTC in reply to "Interesting 1970s Ad "
Hussein Member since:
2008-11-22

On the OS X App Store Xcode has been in the top 5 free apps for as long as I remember.

Reply Score: 2

I guess...
by thavith_osn on Sun 20th May 2012 14:17 UTC
thavith_osn
Member since:
2005-07-11

...they used an OCR or some such to import the text from the PDF, I could only remember 16 colours in lores mode, not 75 of them (well, 75 for the demo :-) When I saw the PDF from BYTE, sure enough, 15 colours there was in the demo.

Until AppleSoft came out I guess they didn't really focus on hires graphics too much. I wish Woz wrote the float BASIC too, that would have been so much faster then AppleSoft was. I remember Beagle Bros and others had compilers for BASIC. To be honest, I never used Int BASIC too much, I was introduced to the Apple ][ in 1980, AppleSoft was already there.

Anyway, what a great read, I remember with fondness those days, but I'd hate to relive them now I've seen todays computers / Internet :-)

] CALL -151
# 3D0G

Reply Score: 4

Sweet16, a bytecode interpreter!
by gus3 on Mon 21st May 2012 05:03 UTC
gus3
Member since:
2010-09-02

Ignore...

Edited 2012-05-21 05:10 UTC

Reply Score: 1

Sweet16, a bytecode interpreter!
by gus3 on Mon 21st May 2012 05:06 UTC
gus3
Member since:
2010-09-02

Granted, the primary purpose of the interpreter is to manipulate 16-bit pointers on an 8-bit system, but I have to wonder:

If BrainF*ck is Turing-complete, and Conway's Game of Life can simulate a Turing-complete system, can Sweet16 also be considered Turing-complete?

It almost gives me a headache. Conway's Game of Life, running a BrainF*ck interpreter, implementing a Sweet16 virtual machine. Owwww....

Reply Score: 2

BYTE me
by mrAmiga500 on Mon 21st May 2012 18:04 UTC
mrAmiga500
Member since:
2009-03-20

If you like vintage BYTE, go here:
http://malus.exotica.org.uk/~buzz/byte/pdf/

Reply Score: 2

...Inexpensive?!?
by karunko on Tue 22nd May 2012 08:48 UTC
karunko
Member since:
2008-10-28

Not to detract from its place in computer history but, since the original retail price of the Apple ][ computer was $1298.00 for the model with 4 KB of RAM and a whopping $2638.00 for the one with 48 KB, I wouldn't call that inexpensive -- unless the meaning of "inexpensive" has changed overnight, of course. ;-)

And just to put things in the right context: if we account for inflation $1298.00 from 1977 are the equivalent of today's $4928.00! (http://www.usinflationcalculator.com)

Oh, and the TRS-80 also debuted in 1977 and Radio Shack sold it for $399.00 or $599.00 with a 12" monitor, which proves that Apple and "inexpensive" really don't belong together.



RT.

PS: Even the Commodore PET 2001, also introduced in 1977 with built-in monitor and cassette for storage, retailed for $795.00.

Edited 2012-05-22 08:56 UTC

Reply Score: 3