Linked by Thom Holwerda on Fri 25th May 2012 08:40 UTC
In the News "Dozens of teachers specialising in computer science are to work in English schools thanks to a partnership between Google and the charity Teach First. Google's chairman Eric Schmidt said money would also be provided to buy 'teaching aids, such as Raspberry Pi's or Arduino starter kits'. He said that without investment in the subject, the UK risked 'losing a generation' of scientists." My Raspberry Pi should arrive via UPS today, assuming they don't mess up. I'll try and get a few photos and first impressions up if it does arrive.
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v Comment by marcp
by marcp on Fri 25th May 2012 09:07 UTC
RE: Comment by marcp
by Radio on Fri 25th May 2012 09:18 UTC in reply to "Comment by marcp"
Radio Member since:
2009-06-20

Now, where's the catch? Google needs to earn money, so here must be some catch somewhere.

No. They get good PR, and possibly tax deductions. And long-term, future competent employees with deep loyalty.

As for privacy, Google has the best record of all comparable companies out there, larger problems like the Patriot Act abusive powers notwithstanding. Far better than Microsoft and Apple, yes.

Thanks, troll. This could have been a nice discussion on teaching CS to children, but now you derailed it, I fear it will just be three pages of back-and-forth on Google's privacy invasion - Oh, the horror of a unified privacy policy! Oh, look, they snooped on completely open wifi networks! My house was visited by robbers and it was all Google Street View's fault! Etc.

Edited 2012-05-25 09:19 UTC

Reply Score: 1

v RE[2]: Comment by marcp
by marcp on Fri 25th May 2012 09:36 UTC in reply to "RE: Comment by marcp"
RE[3]: Comment by marcp
by MOS6510 on Fri 25th May 2012 09:54 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Comment by marcp"
MOS6510 Member since:
2011-05-12

Google is an enemy of privacy, but I don't think they're going to invade the privacy of students using Pi's. There aren't that many English students compared to the world population, nor have they a lot of money to spend on products that appear in Google provided ads.

It doesn't cost Google that much money so it's probably a PR move. I don't think that's very evil, let them have good PR and the school Pi's, everyone's a winner.

If it turns out a success it will be good for education and Pi.

Reply Score: 3

RE[3]: Comment by marcp
by Radio on Fri 25th May 2012 09:55 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Comment by marcp"
Radio Member since:
2009-06-20

Google is funding a third-party charity to buy open fourth-party computer development kits for children.

You immediatly divert the discussion on Google privacy policy.

You do not, at any time, point out any potential problem with the subject at hand. "But knowing Google as we all know it it's something more." Please do tell us what is this hidden, nefarious goal that Google is pursuing with this scheme. I in particular is interested, for I do seem in your eyes to be a naïve and dumb victim. Please enlighten me.

Or else you are, indeed, paranoid and/or a troll.

Reply Score: 5

v RE[4]: Comment by marcp
by marcp on Fri 25th May 2012 12:13 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: Comment by marcp"
RE[5]: Comment by marcp
by Thom_Holwerda on Fri 25th May 2012 12:38 UTC in reply to "RE[4]: Comment by marcp"
Thom_Holwerda Member since:
2005-06-29

When people use Google they pay for the services with their own freaking data and privacy. How hard is it to understand this simple fact? Simple trade - comfort for security and privacy. This is how it works. Enough said. I was not intending to talk about privacy alone, really.


And despite Google supposedly trading your privacy... They are the only large technology company providing insight into the collected data, how to retrieve said data, how to prevent said data from being collected in the first place, and how to get it out.

Apple provides zero insight. Zero. Nothing. Nada. Microsoft probably provides some, but I doubt they allow you to retrieve, delete, etc.

Reply Score: 6

RE[5]: Comment by marcp
by Radio on Fri 25th May 2012 13:03 UTC in reply to "RE[4]: Comment by marcp"
Radio Member since:
2009-06-20

So, genius, could you point me where this has a friggin' relationship with Google funding a charity to get Raspberry Pis and Arduinos into schoolrooms?

Crazy.

Reply Score: 4

RE[6]: Comment by marcp
by andih on Mon 28th May 2012 00:20 UTC in reply to "RE[5]: Comment by marcp"
andih Member since:
2010-03-27

Actually there is a relationship, google needs openness to compete and earn money, and this is good pr for them.

winners r us

Reply Score: 3

RE[5]: Comment by marcp
by Vanders on Fri 25th May 2012 13:34 UTC in reply to "RE[4]: Comment by marcp"
Vanders Member since:
2005-07-06

Oh, indeed. I am delighted to provide you with enlightenment. You see, there is a thing called "vendor lock-in". Its cousin is "make-them-use-our-brand-and-feel-at-home-with-our-so-called-"free" -products-good". It's all about habit and potential monetization of this habit.


So Googles nefarious master plan is to lock little kiddies into using a platform they didn't develop, do not control and have not directly funded, is not branded by them or related to their brand in any way, and does not run software developed by Google?

Truly, Google must be evil geniuses. How did we not see through this cunning plan earlier?!

Reply Score: 9

RE[6]: Comment by marcp
by zima on Fri 25th May 2012 16:59 UTC in reply to "RE[5]: Comment by marcp"
zima Member since:
2005-07-06

Ahh, but see, it's exactly that we can't even fathom what the grand plan is which makes somebody a true Evil Genius ;P

Reply Score: 2

RE[6]: Comment by marcp
by zima on Wed 30th May 2012 00:11 UTC in reply to "RE[5]: Comment by marcp"
zima Member since:
2005-07-06

PS. Perhaps you could get slice of the cake, too - port Syllable to RPi?

Reply Score: 2

RE[5]: Comment by marcp
by marcp on Fri 25th May 2012 15:57 UTC in reply to "RE[4]: Comment by marcp"
marcp Member since:
2007-11-23

Well, I do hope you're right, but only time can tell.
I may be wrong and I'd like to be wrong in this case, because it's about charity and human development.

Reply Score: 2

RE: Comment by marcp
by sirspudd on Sat 26th May 2012 18:26 UTC in reply to "Comment by marcp"
sirspudd Member since:
2010-10-13

Saying every corporation is the same is like saying every person is the same, stoopid

Reply Score: 2

I really hope ...
by OutOfOffice on Fri 25th May 2012 09:09 UTC
OutOfOffice
Member since:
2010-01-10

Really hope this takes off but I can imagine some schools not taking it up seriously. I have a pi on order and will be showing it to my kids if they are interested, be good for them to use it a school too instead of playing with all the MS products which is all they seem to do.

Just wait for MS to throw hardware and more cheap / free products at the schools as they won't want to lose the position they are in where kids are brought up on MS pretty much exclusively.

Reply Score: 2

RE: I really hope ...
by MOS6510 on Fri 25th May 2012 09:47 UTC in reply to "I really hope ..."
MOS6510 Member since:
2011-05-12

It's hard to beat the Pi on cheapness though.

To me it seems it's usable on a different number of subjects. Not only computer science, but also physics for example or handwork classes where you can make a nice looking case for it.

To make it even more fun for the students I'd let them keep it when the year's over.

Reply Score: 4

jabbotts Member since:
2007-09-06

The plan is to train computer teachers then send them off to the schools with a pocket full of budget to buy equipment. The Pi is one potential option they may spend that budget on.

Microsoft could simply continue the practice of swooping in with a truck load of hardware to donate complete computer labs.

Pi @ 35$ > MS donations @ 0$

I think it would be a travesty if MS did such a thing just to keep the "get them early" loyalty program going but it has been there usual response to schools choosing other branding.

Reply Score: 3

ilovebeer Member since:
2011-08-08

The plan is to train computer teachers then send them off to the schools with a pocket full of budget to buy equipment. The Pi is one potential option they may spend that budget on.

Microsoft could simply continue the practice of swooping in with a truck load of hardware to donate complete computer labs.

Pi @ 35$ > MS donations @ 0$

I think it would be a travesty if MS did such a thing just to keep the "get them early" loyalty program going but it has been there usual response to schools choosing other branding.

You say that as if there's not any mutual benefit. How exactly does it harm a school when their entire computer lab costs them $0? How exactly does it harm the students that they have a computer lab to use? Lastly, what do you expect in a system that's been forced to see out their own sponsors and partnerships because they've been grossly underfunded by the politicians? If you remove big business from our education system, you have practically nothing left at all. Would that be better?

Reply Score: 3

Soulbender Member since:
2005-08-18

If you remove big business from our education system, you have practically nothing left at all.


If that's he case maybe you should get cracking on creating s system that doesn't suck.

Reply Score: 2

ilovebeer Member since:
2011-08-08

If you remove big business from our education system, you have practically nothing left at all.

If that's he case maybe you should get cracking on creating s system that doesn't suck.

That kind of change can only come from congress. They are, afterall, the ones who gutted & ruined our education system, along with using college as a means to get into the load business.

Reply Score: 2

ilovebeer Member since:
2011-08-08


That kind of change can only come from congress. They are, afterall, the ones who gutted & ruined our education system, along with using college as a means to get into the load business.

*loan business. Stupid time-limit on editing your own posts.

Reply Score: 2

RE: I really hope ...
by Radio on Fri 25th May 2012 09:57 UTC in reply to "I really hope ..."
Radio Member since:
2009-06-20

"Now children, let me teach you how to program for Windows CE."

Reply Score: 4

Comment by ilovebeer
by ilovebeer on Fri 25th May 2012 15:20 UTC
ilovebeer
Member since:
2011-08-08

I'm not knocking anyone who takes action that benefits children/education. Regardless of their motives, if it helps kids, go for it. However, the raspberry pi is not exactly powerful. It may do well helping kids learn python and browse the web (at some point in the future when X is hw accelerated). But, you aren't going to be doing anything math intensive on it, and you better have a good book handy if you want to compile anything because you're going to be waiting a while.

In some cases, the raspberry pi will do just fine and is a good solution (assuming the system will find its way to being stable). But as a good general use computer, look elsewhere.

Reply Score: 2

RE: Comment by ilovebeer
by OutOfOffice on Fri 25th May 2012 18:37 UTC in reply to "Comment by ilovebeer"
OutOfOffice Member since:
2010-01-10

I don't disagree.
I would rather my kids come home telling me what they have made the computer do (python, whatever) rather than coming home saying 'we made a powerpoint presentation today'.
Even web pages they use Dreamweaver!! My tax GBP at work, obviously.

Also, these are kids we are talking about .. probably secondary school, 11 - 16 years old. Not certain compiling something is in the remit as yet.

Many of the kids won't be interested, but those that are will hopefully get the opportunity and guidance and I don't think that's a bad thing.

Reply Score: 3