Linked by Thom Holwerda on Wed 20th Jun 2012 00:40 UTC, submitted by rohan_p
Amiga & AROS "Icaros Desktop is an effort to build a modern Amiga-compatible operating system for standard x86 hardware. It's a distribution built atop AROS, which is an open source effort to create a system compatible at the API level with the AmigaOS 3.x series. I recently had a chat to the creator of Icaros, Paolo Besser, about the creation of the OS and why Amiga continues to inspire people today."
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Hmmm
by Soulbender on Wed 20th Jun 2012 05:38 UTC
Soulbender
Member since:
2005-08-18

On Windows the equivalent to ASSIGN is SUBST.

Reply Score: 2

RE: Hmmm
by MOS6510 on Wed 20th Jun 2012 07:08 UTC in reply to "Hmmm"
MOS6510 Member since:
2011-05-12

ASSIGN also works with floppy disk names, allowing AmigaOS to prompt for you to insert the correct floppy when it's needed.

Not sure that's still a feature in high demand these days though. The early Amiga's tended not to have a hard disk and one of the first things people bought was an extra disk drive.

Reply Score: 2

RE[2]: Hmmm
by zima on Wed 20th Jun 2012 09:18 UTC in reply to "RE: Hmmm"
zima Member since:
2005-07-06

one of the first things people bought was an extra disk drive.

I doubt it. Also, as far as personal anecdotes go, I've never even seen an external Amiga disk drive - and we both know majority of Amigas were basically just gaming machines, built-in floppy being fine for that.

Extra joystick OTOH...

Reply Score: 2

RE[3]: Hmmm
by MOS6510 on Wed 20th Jun 2012 09:29 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Hmmm"
MOS6510 Member since:
2011-05-12

All the Amiga people I knew played games, but also did serious stuff.

Don't forget that an extra disk drive makes copying games much more convenient. Insert the original and a blank, press a button. Also more and more multi disk games started appearing.

So they all bought an extra drive and the 512 KB memory upgrade which also featured a battery powered clock.

Actually I don't think anyone bought an extra joystick, we all had joysticks for our Commodore 64/128 and the Amiga used the same connector. More likely they bought a splitter cable so you didn't have to take out your mouse each time you wanted to play a two player game.

Reply Score: 2

RE[4]: Hmmm
by zima on Wed 20th Jun 2012 09:50 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: Hmmm"
zima Member since:
2005-07-06

As I pointed out, personal anecdotes only go so far ...might be also a difference between places, how one just got copied games at ~shops here, and the usually very economically unattractive add-ons (while those with Amigas had them specifically because they were inexpensive).

But Amigas being used mostly for games is a fairly reliable info. And most importantly, when you look at auction sites today, Amiga sets including external disk drives or memory expansions are much rarer than "plain" configs...

PS. And when getting Amiga, one typically got rid of C64 set - also to aid in Amiga purchase. Plus the joysticks of old days seemed to have relatively short lifespans... (I did prevail with only one set, but mostly thanks to my repair abilities which first manifested themselves like that)

Edited 2012-06-20 10:05 UTC

Reply Score: 2

RE[5]: Hmmm
by MOS6510 on Wed 20th Jun 2012 10:25 UTC in reply to "RE[4]: Hmmm"
MOS6510 Member since:
2011-05-12

Amiga's being used for games is probably a fact, but an extra floppy drive is an logical assumption. Try using an Amiga without an extra drive, you spend more time swapping disks than using it. Perhaps these extra drives easily got lost when people moved their Amiga's in to the attic for storage. I must admit I'm not sure where my extra drives are.

The most popular joystick was the Arcade, which I never had fail on me, unlike others. Buy I also have these crappy Atari 2600 joysticks and they keep working too. I guess I have a gentle touch.

Reply Score: 2

RE[6]: Hmmm
by zima on Wed 20th Jun 2012 10:43 UTC in reply to "RE[5]: Hmmm"
zima Member since:
2005-07-06

an extra floppy drive is an logical assumption

Not really. Each Amiga had a floppy drive already built in, which worked perfectly fine. And most of their users were very price-concious, often kids.
Similar ~social dynamics of Amigans can be seen with quite poor uptake of A1200 or "big" Amigas - yes, they were better, but to most not worth it, not when vast libraries of software worked fine with "plain" models; very limited funds could go elsewhere.

Sure, an extra drive afforded some convenience now and then - but games, if multi-floppy, were mostly structured to be "linearly" sectioned onto disks (plus you yourself pointed out recently that RPGs had small uptake).

Try using an Amiga without an extra drive, you spend more time swapping disks than using it

That is an unfounded hyperbole. I did use an Amiga without an extra drive, as did virtually all around (as I said, I've never even seen one). And it was still great (at least large part of games, maybe most, being single-floppy, anyway)

Perhaps these extra drives easily got lost when people moved their Amiga's in to the attic for storage.

And that is a very convenient conjecture, indeed - almost all those floppy drives just lost like that...
But at the least, memory expansions definitely wouldn't share their fate - and they're also virtually absent from auction sites, while you implied their wide, and comparable to disk drives, uptake.

Edited 2012-06-20 10:52 UTC

Reply Score: 2

RE[7]: Hmmm
by MOS6510 on Wed 20th Jun 2012 11:00 UTC in reply to "RE[6]: Hmmm"
MOS6510 Member since:
2011-05-12

"an extra floppy drive is an logical assumption

Not really. Each Amiga had a floppy drive already built in, which worked perfectly fine. And most of their users were very price-concious, often kids.
"

I was a poor kid and I had an extra drive. It really was worth the money.


Similar ~social dynamics of Amigans can be seen with quite poor uptake of A1200 or "big" Amigas - yes, they was better, but to most not worth it, not when very limited funds could go elsewhere.

Sure, an extra drive afforded some convenience now and then - but games, if multi-floppy, were mostly structured to be "linearly" sectioned onto disks (plus you yourself pointed out recently that RPGs had small uptake).


Not only RPGs came on multiple disks, others did too. And as I mentioned gamers also used their Amiga for serious stuff, if only for copying game disks or making a database of their games collection.


"Try using an Amiga without an extra drive, you spend more time swapping disks than using it


That is an unfounded hyperbole. I did use an Amiga without an extra drive, as did virtually all around (as I said, I've never even seen one). And it was still great (at least large part of games, maybe most, being single-floppy, anyway)
"

I'm sure if you did have an extra drive and it broke down you'd be very sad. Okay, if you only played single disk games you wouldn't need an extra drive.


"Perhaps these extra drives easily got lost when people moved their Amiga's in to the attic for storage.

And that is a very convenient conjecture, indeed - almost all those floppy drives just lost like that...
But at the least, memory expansions definitely wouldn't share their fate - and they're also virtually absent from auction sites, while you implied their wide, and comparable to disk drives, uptake.
"

Well, that's easy: they are build in. IIRC only the Amiga 500 "needed" this expansion, later Amiga's had more memory and a build in battery powered clock. As they were installed over 20 years ago most people probably don't even know they have them.

I can find my Amiga's, but I don't know where my extras are like the external drives, mice, hard disk, faster CPU add-on, sound sampler and a "hacking" cartridge.

Reply Score: 3

RE[5]: Hmmm
by Sauron on Wed 20th Jun 2012 10:53 UTC in reply to "RE[4]: Hmmm"
Sauron Member since:
2005-08-02

What you on about? I knew a LOT of people with Amiga's back in the day and every one of them had a extra external floppy drive, me included! I still use Amiga's now and have hard drives fitted, but I still have external floppy's.

And most importantly, when you look at auction sites today, Amiga sets including external disk drives or memory expansions are much rarer than "plain" configs..

You don't see Amiga's sold with external floppy drives because they fetch more when sold separate, same as accelerators, genlocks, squirrel SCSI interfaces and anything else hardware based! Your arguing over something you obviously know nothing about!

And one didn't and doesn't use a external floppy to copy shop bought games, (although you could/can with a cyclone lead between your Amiga and external floppy). Quite a few games required a blank floppy disk to use as a save game disk and a extra drive removed the hassle of disk swaps all the time, plus productivity software was/is much more usable with a external floppy and is much easier to make backups of said software. (Copying a disk with just the internal drive if you didn't have a memory expansion was slow and painful)!
Maybe a few got rid of there previous setup, but you'd be surprised how many didn't! I didn't either and still have my Atari 600XL and 800XL and all peripherals and software with them, (not been used for a while though).

Oh! And this is not a personal anecdote either! ;)

Reply Score: 2

RE[6]: Hmmm
by zima on Wed 20th Jun 2012 11:09 UTC in reply to "RE[5]: Hmmm"
zima Member since:
2005-07-06

Maybe in the UK - Amiga also had a very long life as a budget machine in less affluent places (but, yeah, let's just extrapolate local bubbles without 2nd thought; obviously those who wonder about wider picture, plus point out what can be seen in surplus channels, "argue" about something they know nothing about). And...

You don't see Amiga's sold with external floppy drives because they fetch more when sold separate [...] Your arguing over something you obviously know nothing about!

...doesn't address why those drives are comparably rare (that could be a good reason why something always fetches quite high prices), either way.

And one didn't and doesn't use a external floppy to copy shop bought games

I very specifically wrote "personal anecdotes only go so far ...might be also a difference between places, how one just got copied games at ~shops here" - I've never even seen an original Amiga game, ever.
~Shops sold "pirated" games - but, really, the copyright didn't even apply to software until 1994 or so (and afterwards, the enforcement was lax for a few years)

Reply Score: 2

RE[7]: Hmmm
by Sauron on Wed 20th Jun 2012 11:11 UTC in reply to "RE[6]: Hmmm"
Sauron Member since:
2005-08-02

Not rare at all. just look on Ebay and Amibay, plenty of em there.

Reply Score: 1

RE[5]: Hmmm
by Laurence on Wed 20th Jun 2012 12:33 UTC in reply to "RE[4]: Hmmm"
Laurence Member since:
2007-03-26

As I pointed out, personal anecdotes only go so far ...might be also a difference between places, how one just got copied games at ~shops here, and the usually very economically unattractive add-ons (while those with Amigas had them specifically because they were inexpensive).

But Amigas being used mostly for games is a fairly reliable info. And most importantly, when you look at auction sites today, Amiga sets including external disk drives or memory expansions are much rarer than "plain" configs...

PS. And when getting Amiga, one typically got rid of C64 set - also to aid in Amiga purchase. Plus the joysticks of old days seemed to have relatively short lifespans... (I did prevail with only one set, but mostly thanks to my repair abilities which first manifested themselves like that)


I don't think eBay is a reliable source for statistics because, on the whole, computers fetch more when broken down and sold as parts rather than sold as a whole. Thus it's not beyond reason that most Amiga's are sold without attachments so the attachments can be sold separately - thus maximizing the potential for profit.

That all said, you're observations might still be accurate - I just wouldn't cite ebay as evidence.

From a personal perspective, most of the people I know jumped from C64 to Win3.x compatable PC (oh the shame) - so I don't even have much in the way of anecdotal evidence ;)

[edit]

I think the joystick life space (or lack of) can be credited to those highly addictive sporting games (eg Olympics) where the controls consisted of jamming the joystick from side to side as rapidly as physically possible!

Edited 2012-06-20 12:42 UTC

Reply Score: 2

RE[6]: Hmmm
by zima on Wed 20th Jun 2012 13:04 UTC in reply to "RE[5]: Hmmm"
zima Member since:
2005-07-06

That's also with them available separately - I just glanced on my local "ebay" and there are only three drives, four memory expansions, for 30+ Amigas (2 expanded, none with 2nd drive). Why such large discrepancies? (OK, we can presume than in more affluent places this was perhaps half, but the implied ~all? ...and even if, the less affluent places offset this by themselves)

But yeah, hard to tell anything about many such aspects of the past. I can say that Amiga lived here much longer - PCs are a thing of Win98 and Celerons, onwards.
And also that I was never into games meant for computer's satisfaction ;) (but seriously, many inexpensive joysticks were just fragile; and perhaps the concept was flawed - joypads are a marked improvement, me thinks; perhaps they even make those old games better, under emus)

Edited 2012-06-20 13:05 UTC

Reply Score: 2

RE[7]: Hmmm
by Laurence on Wed 20th Jun 2012 17:04 UTC in reply to "RE[6]: Hmmm"
Laurence Member since:
2007-03-26

That's also with them available separately - I just glanced on my local "ebay" and there are only three drives, four memory expansions, for 30+ Amigas (2 expanded, none with 2nd drive). Why such large discrepancies? (OK, we can presume than in more affluent places this was perhaps half, but the implied ~all? ...and even if, the less affluent places offset this by themselves)

Using those figures, you could also draw the conclusion that people who are willing to spend money buying addons and accessories for their Amigas are more likely to have an emotional attachment to their computer and thus less likely to sell it. Where as people who couldn't justify the upgrade costs are more likely to sell it once it becomes obsolete.

My point is this: your statistics are interesting, but meaningless. So using them as evidence or trying to draw correlations to prove a point will inevitably produce flawed results.

So while I appreciate that you're trying to substantiate your anecdotal evidence, ebay is not right place to source your figures. Better statistics would be sales figures from the era.

Reply Score: 2

RE[6]: Hmmm
by MOS6510 on Wed 20th Jun 2012 13:57 UTC in reply to "RE[5]: Hmmm"
MOS6510 Member since:
2011-05-12

Thus it's not beyond reason that most Amiga's are sold without attachments so the attachments can be sold separately - thus maximizing the potential for profit.


Greedy bastards.


From a personal perspective, most of the people I know jumped from C64 to Win3.x compatable PC (oh the shame)


Traitors!!!


I think the joystick life space (or lack of) can be credited to those highly addictive sporting games (eg Olympics) where the controls consisted of jamming the joystick from side to side as rapidly as physically possible!


Morons.

Well, that's enough large groups of people I have just insulted.

Reply Score: 2

RE[7]: Hmmm
by Laurence on Wed 20th Jun 2012 16:54 UTC in reply to "RE[6]: Hmmm"
Laurence Member since:
2007-03-26

lol you must have played those sports games before?

Reply Score: 2

RE[7]: Hmmm
by zima on Wed 20th Jun 2012 21:52 UTC in reply to "RE[6]: Hmmm"
zima Member since:
2005-07-06

Morons.

You know what would be fun? Recording people playing such game, carefully finding most suitable shots/framing, and then applying some copious amounts of unnecessary censorship
( http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NdZpATBJnZM the mosaic one; too bad decent video recording equipment was much harder to come by back then, and even worse with video editing... yeah, Amiga was one of the first to have some form of it; but it wasn't NLE, not much of actual editing)

Reply Score: 2

RE[3]: Hmmm
by henderson101 on Wed 20th Jun 2012 18:34 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Hmmm"
henderson101 Member since:
2006-05-30

I had a 500 and never owned an external hard disk or floppy. I have a second floppy now, but that was given to me by a friend clearing out his old gear.

Reply Score: 2

RE[3]: Hmmm
by Gooberslot on Fri 22nd Jun 2012 08:42 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Hmmm"
Gooberslot Member since:
2006-08-02

The first purchase I made for my A500 was an external disk drive and 512K ram. I didn't know any Amiga users that didn't have at least that.

Reply Score: 1

RE: Hmmm
by daedalus on Wed 20th Jun 2012 07:36 UTC in reply to "Hmmm"
daedalus Member since:
2011-01-14

It's similar, but not quite the same or as flexible. For a start there are things like deferring an assign until the media it points to is available (be it floppy, hard drive, USB drive, whatever), and then there's the possibility to assign to volumes or devices, meaning you can assign to a folder which may reside on a CD or hard drive for example. And then you can add assigns together, so you can assign a drive to multiple folders which will be searched in order for any file accesses requested. It's something which I miss regularly on all other operating systems I use regularly...

Reply Score: 4

RE: Hmmm
by viton on Wed 20th Jun 2012 16:25 UTC in reply to "Hmmm"
viton Member since:
2005-08-09

subst WINDOWS: d:\WINDOWS
?
Ohh... does it support names, or just idiotic one-letters?
And how about multiple folders?

Edited 2012-06-20 16:29 UTC

Reply Score: 2

RE[2]: Hmmm
by Doc Pain on Wed 20th Jun 2012 22:06 UTC in reply to "RE: Hmmm"
Doc Pain Member since:
2006-10-08

subst WINDOWS: d:\WINDOWS
?
Ohh... does it support names, or just idiotic one-letters?
And how about multiple folders?


Using my miraculous memory of neverforgetting wisdom storage:

> SUBST K: C:\LONG\PATH\TO\KLOTZ

The SUBST command assigns an idiotic drive letter to a directory. By changing to the K: drive, you will actually end up in the C:\LONG\PATH\TO\KLOTZ directory.

> JOIN A: C:\FLOPPY

The JOIN command makes the system refer to a disk drive (though a drive letter) when accessing a directory. Here any operation within C:\FLOPPY will result in an operation on the A: drive.

> ASSIGN R:=A:

The ASSIGN command changes the reference to one drive letter to another one (in this case, refering to R: will delegate access to A:).

Maybe it's possible to use a combination of SUBST and JOIN (creating something like a mount command), maybe involving ASSIGN...

Enough history lessons now, my brain hurts! :-)

Reply Score: 3

RE[2]: Hmmm
by Soulbender on Thu 21st Jun 2012 03:18 UTC in reply to "RE: Hmmm"
Soulbender Member since:
2005-08-18

does it support names, or just idiotic one-letters?


Since drives on Windows have only one letter, it obviously only support one letter.

Reply Score: 2

Comment by bloodline
by bloodline on Wed 20th Jun 2012 06:17 UTC
bloodline
Member since:
2008-07-28

I recommend IcAros as the first AROS distribution that people try! It really is the simplest way to try AROS ;)

Reply Score: 3

How icaros brings the laughs to x86 PCs
by MORB on Wed 20th Jun 2012 20:49 UTC
MORB
Member since:
2005-07-06

there are a number of projects that have been inspired by the system, taking the 'best practices' elements developers feel were present in the Amiga and reimplementing them in a modern OS.

all apps and the os sharing the same address space, doing object orientation by building messages and parsing them back instead of direct method calls, no separation of user code and kernel code,

best practices

lmao

Reply Score: 2

sergio Member since:
2005-07-06

AmigaOS is a single-user system without preemptive multitasking... having single address space isn't the end of the world.

AmigaOS 4 for example uses grim reaper to address application's hangs and from a practical point of view the system isn't so unstable at all.

And even if the system hangs, It boots so quickly and so clean that it's really a non issue (you can do a soft reset too, and It takes less than 1 second to do it, literally speaking).

Taking into account that AmigaOS 4 flies even using very under-powered hardware... hey maybe their ideas aren't so wrong!

I think AmigaOS and Amiga-like systems have a totally different philosophy than mainstream OSes... you can't judge AmigaOS from a Unix/orthodox point of view. It's a waste of time.

Reply Score: 2

MORB Member since:
2005-07-06

without preemptive multitasking...

look how wrong you are, be prepared for hordes of your fellow amigaos fans to tear you a new one

having single address space isn't the end of the world.

yeah as long as none of your apps ever manipulate any sensitive piece of information
oops the only real app you have is a web browser, sorry for your passwords/credit card numbers/bank account logins

AmigaOS 4 for example uses grim reaper to address application's hangs

only if the app didn't dereference some bad pointer and shit all over the memory but amiga developers all use assembly and C so welp

and from a practical point of view the system isn't so unstable at all.

I remember my standards to call an os "not so unstable" back when I was a dumb developer on amiga os and well lol

And even if the system hangs, It boots so quickly and so clean that it's really a non issue (you can do a soft reset too, and It takes less than 1 second to do it, literally speaking).

nevermind losing all the state of your apps, great usability
oh wait you have no useful apps anyway

Taking into account that AmigaOS 4 flies even using very under-powered hardware... hey maybe their ideas aren't so wrong!

"the hardware to run amigaos 4 is orders of magnitudes more expensive as an off-the-shelf PC while being also orders of magnitude slower, but amiga os 4 (an inept OS with no useful applications) flies on it"

amiga user logic

I think AmigaOS and Amiga-like systems have a totally different philosophy than mainstream OSes... you can't judge AmigaOS from a Unix/orthodox point of view. It's a waste of time.

"yeah it's expensive as hell and I can't do anything useful with it but look how fast it boots and opens workbench windows"
*looks down on winblow$/linux/maco$ users and do a smug, satisfied little smile*

Edited 2012-06-20 22:05 UTC

Reply Score: 1

sergio Member since:
2005-07-06

Haters gonna hate... BTW AmigaOS 4 is not for everyone, but It's a really nice OS, It's fun to use, fun to develop for and It's really different to the bloated software that We're used to use.

Just a silly example but... I can run Quake 3, Quake 2 and Heretic using different resolutions at the same time and switch instantly between them in my 733mhz SAM with 512MB... I can't do anything similar in my 10 or 20 times more powerful Macbook Pro with 8gb of RAM... OS X is slow even to switch between desktop spaces! (and Linux is the same or worse, dunno 'bout Windows pbly even worse than Linux)

AmigaOS gives us a lesson: modern hardware is ruined by layers and layers and layers of complexity and bloated software.

Reply Score: 2

leech Member since:
2006-01-10

Haters gonna hate... BTW AmigaOS 4 is not for everyone, but It's a really nice OS, It's fun to use, fun to develop for and It's really different to the bloated software that We're used to use.

While I myself have never tried AmigaOS 4, even certain things on my A4000 with AmigaOS 3.9 and a Radeon 9250 just seem faster than doing things under Linux / Windows. One of those is using magic menu to right click and have all of the applications menus wherever I am on the screen. I agree that most operating systems (in this case I refer to Linux's Desktop Environments as separate operating systems i.e. KDE, Gnome, Enlightenment, etc)

Just a silly example but... I can run Quake 3, Quake 2 and Heretic using different resolutions at the same time and switch instantly between them in my 733mhz SAM with 512MB... I can't do anything similar in my 10 or 20 times more powerful Macbook Pro with 8gb of RAM... OS X is slow even to switch between desktop spaces! (and Linux is the same or worse, dunno 'bout Windows pbly even worse than Linux)


Actually under Gnome-shell and KDE, switching between workspaces is extremely fast, and frighteningly fast under E17 (which, even though it's not finished) reminds me a lot of the Amiga, and really is not bloated in the way a lot of DEs and OSs are.)

Windows doesn't even have workspaces, you have to use some third party add-ons, and they never work quite right.

AmigaOS gives us a lesson: modern hardware is ruined by layers and layers and layers of complexity and bloated software.


Agreed, agreed and agreed. Many times I tell people that the operating system should be solely written in Assembly, C, or C++. Can you imagine if the entire UI, kernel, and main applications were all written in assembly how sickeningly fast it would be?

Instead we get people writing things in Java, which has to be one of the worse offenders in making it far too easy to make bloated code.

My only complaint about AmigaOS 4 is the lack of available hardware to run it on, and due to that lack, it's extremely expensive. The only real way to 'bring Amiga back' is to release something like a Raspberry Pi / Beagle Board / Panda Board type setup that is cheap, but PPC / 68k compatible, then release AmigaOS4 on it.

Maybe those netbooks that are supposed to come out will help a lot though (I'll probably buy one if they are cheap enough)

Reply Score: 3

MORB Member since:
2005-07-06

Just a silly example but... I can run Quake 3, Quake 2 and Heretic using different resolutions at the same time and switch instantly between them in my 733mhz SAM with 512MB...

Wow, that's certainly a compelling use case. I find myself needing to do this every day.
You are running ancient games using very little video memory on a machine that probably have a ton of the thing compared to the era when these games were the state of the art.
It's well documented that video memory size increases at a much faster rate than the bandwidth between the system memory and the video memory.
If you could run modern games that use 512mb or more video memory on amiga os, switching between multiple instances of them would be as slow as on anything else because you'd have to reupload all that stuff to video memory just the same as any other os.

On the other hand nobody cares because running multiple games on the same machine is pointless.


I can't do anything similar in my 10 or 20 times more powerful Macbook Pro with 8gb of RAM... OS X is slow even to switch between desktop spaces! (and Linux is the same or worse, dunno 'bout Windows pbly even worse than Linux)

Switching desktop spaces in linux is instanteous save from transition effects and it's very likely the same on macos, I have no idea what you're on about.

AmigaOS gives us a lesson: modern hardware is ruined by layers and layers and layers of complexity and bloated software.

No, the lesson is actually: "if you don't support any hardware or any modern feature that makes useful things possible, you end up with simpler and faster code". Who would have thought?

Edited 2012-06-21 08:25 UTC

Reply Score: 2

sergio Member since:
2005-07-06

The thing is... We really need an enormous multi-user OS to perform simple everyday tasks?

For a lot of tasks I prefer the quickness of AmigaOS.

And the market is saying something similar: iOS is the way to go.

Not Mac OS X nor Windows. People wants simpler TV-like embebedd OSs... and me too.

Reply Score: 2

MORB Member since:
2005-07-06

The thing is... We really need an enormous multi-user OS to perform simple everyday tasks?

For a lot of tasks I prefer the quickness of AmigaOS.

And the market is saying something similar: iOS is the way to go.


Yeah great job, let's compare mobile OS and desktop OS even though they run on completely different platforms designed for completely different needs.

The hilarious part here is that phones, things you keep in your pockets, are more powerful than any amiga hardware in existence and their OSes (which are either macos or Linux based) are for all intent and purpose almost as "enormous" compared to amigaos as their desktop counterparts.

Reply Score: 2

lucas_maximus Member since:
2009-08-18

Windows 7 is usually as fast as Linux for most things. This is the days of Windows XP.

Reply Score: 2

zima Member since:
2005-07-06

There's a reason hardly any serious work is being done on Amiga, and for a long time.

Even if MORB is a bit too harsh in this case, goes too far with criticism of AROS - at least AROS is sane in that it mostly knows its place, knows what it is, a nostalgic toy pet project.

I really doubt you ever had to seriously develop for AmigaOS, and not only because you'd be more likely cursing it instead of calling it fun* - what can you know about Amiga dev if you make such basic mistake like "AmigaOS is a [...] system without preemptive multitasking"?


* yeah, fun fight to have something barely enough for required function that doesn't nuke the OS while running... (ohh, but wasting time on that suddenly places you among the few leet coders)
Plus, such code is unmaintainable; you can see that in how progress ground almost to a halt.
...and then you wonder why people move to other platforms. It had millions of users, now there are estimated few thousand; a per mil left.

Amiga is just old and does very little. Win98 or 2k are also snappy - while being much ahead in software sophistication.

And yay, you can play few FPS games at the same time, how great that the OS and its GFX stack are optimised for such pointless usage...

...games which are ports from the PC; there is a very good reason for that / seriously, you're using a decade+ old PC software as examples of what Amiga can offer? Most of the new useful software are ports from the PC, just lagging behind and with pains of porting to a stable state.
Just cut the middle crap, you ARE making it into a PC anyway (also WRT hardware, just insisting on some non-standard CPU architecture for some reason)

Edited 2012-06-28 00:19 UTC

Reply Score: 2

Pro-Competition Member since:
2007-08-20

AmigaOS is a single-user system without preemptive multitasking... having single address space isn't the end of the world.


I have to ask - what are you talking about here?

1. AmigaOS has always had preemptive multitasking. That was one of the features that truly set it apart from the competition for years.

2. Having a single address space is the single biggest design weakpoint of the system, from a stability and security perspective. (It was forced by the economic realities of the time, of course.)

Reply Score: 2

my mistake!
by sergio on Thu 21st Jun 2012 21:04 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: How icaros brings the laughs to x86 PCs"
sergio Member since:
2005-07-06

I thought It used cooperative multitasking like OS 9 had.

But no, It's true preemptive multitasking as you said. Sorry.

Reply Score: 2

Icaros nice little OS
by lucas_maximus on Thu 21st Jun 2012 18:45 UTC
lucas_maximus
Member since:
2009-08-18

I been mucking about with this in a VM, and it is a nice little system.

Reply Score: 2