Linked by Thom Holwerda on Mon 25th Jun 2012 22:38 UTC
Internet & Networking "If you are on Facebook but have never taken a particular shine to Facebook's e-mail capability, Facebook is intent on changing your mind. As of Friday, the company seems to have quietly given or replaced the display e-mail addresses of all of its users with an @facebook.com address, routing any e-mail communiques you would have received back to its own Messages inboxes." Scummy doesn't even begin to describe this.
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Only real solution: never use Facebook
by Lennie on Mon 25th Jun 2012 22:59 UTC
Lennie
Member since:
2007-09-22

Or at least as little as possible.

The more people interact with it, the higher the chance someone else has to deal with it too.

That is the network effect after all.

I don't use it, I'm still fine.

Reply Score: 14

The cost of Facebook membership?
by fossil on Mon 25th Jun 2012 23:29 UTC
fossil
Member since:
2009-05-29

How much does it cost? my understanding is approximately $0.00.

What else would anyone expect from a "social networking" site? Did FB ever promise to not to do something like this? If so, who believed it?

I rather wonder if this is legal, are they intercepting mail directed at other addresses and "pirating" it into FB? that might be illegal. On the other hand, do you not think that FB has spread around enough <strike>bribes </strike> campaign contributions to render themselves above the law?

"Nothing is to be had for nothing" Epictetus.

Like Lennie, I don't use this kind of crap, and feel no ill effects. Some of my friends are compulsively fixated on FB and obsess on what they think that others think about them. Puke.

Reply Score: 3

vaette Member since:
2008-08-09

Uh, no, no hijacking. If you look at someones profile they have contact information there, and under email you now have your @facebook.com email address even if you used another email address before. There is no confusion about where mails are going. Also you of course as usual get notifications about messages forwarded to your registered "main" mail account.

I don't really see how this is a "scam", but changing peoples profiles without warning is indeed a bit scummy. I don't think there is much damage done to anyone either way however.

Reply Score: 3

libray Member since:
2005-08-27

Changes like this are what investors like to see. More control= more potential

Reply Score: 3

nej_simon Member since:
2011-02-11

How much does it cost? my understanding is approximately $0.00.

What else would anyone expect from a "social networking" site? Did FB ever promise to not to do something like this? If so, who believed it?


No, but that doesn't mean you can't protest when they do.

Facebook isn't "free" btw. You pay by providing them your personal data and looking at ads.

Reply Score: 3

fmaxwell Member since:
2005-11-13

"Did FB ever promise to not to do something like this?"

I never promised that I would not come over to your house and urinate on your porch. So would that mean that you'd have no grounds for moral outrage if you walked out your door and stepped in a puddle of pee?

I tend to think that you are right about the questionable legality. At the very least, it puts Facebook into a very tenuous legal position were the security of their e-mail to be compromised. Imagine a damaging e-mail (does your company know you are looking for work? did that rash on your d*** clear up or do I need to see a doctor?) being published by a hacker who broke in to FB's e-mail system.

I use FB as a means of logging on to forums to post comments and to "like" companies, products, etc. in order to receive discounts and free offers. That's it. I don't accept friend requests. I turn on all the privacy settings.

If someone is a "friend," they have my e-mail address and/or phone number. I don't need to get on FB and collect "friends" like some needy, tween girl seeking approval.

Reply Score: 2

v Lawsuits coming
by Lorin on Tue 26th Jun 2012 00:30 UTC
Oh, come on...
by Delgarde on Tue 26th Jun 2012 00:37 UTC
Delgarde
Member since:
2008-08-19

Seriously, you call this a scam? They've changed their screen to hide personal email addresses by default - something people have been demanding they do for privacy reasons - and you're calling it a scam?

Reply Score: 2

RE: Oh, come on...
by nej_simon on Tue 26th Jun 2012 08:48 UTC in reply to "Oh, come on..."
nej_simon Member since:
2011-02-11

Err... if you want to hide your email-adress you can do that in the profile settings. There is no reason for facebook to override its users' settings and change their email adresses. Nor can I see how there could be any demand from users for facebook to do so.

The reson for this change is probably to have mails being realyed trough facebook's server so that they can monitor their content. That's why some people call it a scam.

Reply Score: 6

RE: Oh, come on...
by ilovebeer on Tue 26th Jun 2012 15:04 UTC in reply to "Oh, come on..."
ilovebeer Member since:
2011-08-08

Seriously, you call this a scam? They've changed their screen to hide personal email addresses by default - something people have been demanding they do for privacy reasons - and you're calling it a scam?

Indeed. Calling this a scam is stupid at best as it's absolutely not scamming people in any way.

Something else that is stupid is how people complain about Facebook's policies as if they are paying customers of the service. Proving minimal information about yourself does not make you a paying customer, you are still a voluntary user. These people also confuse what they _think_ is or should be, as a "right" they have, are owed, or deserve. ...No.

Sorry for the slight rant but this constantly recurring show of ignorance really gets old.

Reply Score: 1

RE: Oh, come on...
by flypig on Tue 26th Jun 2012 17:54 UTC in reply to "Oh, come on..."
flypig Member since:
2005-07-13

I changed my previous comment 'cause it was just wrong.

I agree it doesn't really seem like a scam as suggested in the title. In the summary it says 'scummy', which I think is a fairer description.

Edited 2012-06-26 17:57 UTC

Reply Score: 1

A bit misleading
by jessesmith on Tue 26th Jun 2012 00:41 UTC
jessesmith
Member since:
2010-03-11

The summary is a bit misleading. All Facebook is doing is giving their users a free e-mail address and displaying that e-mail address on people's profile pages. Any e-mail sent to that address lands in the user's message box, just as you would expect it to. Nothing is being redirected or hijacked or rerouted. Facebook is just letting people send their users messages using an e-mail interface.

Reply Score: 3

RE: A bit misleading
by libray on Tue 26th Jun 2012 00:52 UTC in reply to "A bit misleading"
libray Member since:
2005-08-27

Except now facebook can read all mail sent to the default address.

Reply Score: 6

RE[2]: A bit misleading
by dvhh on Tue 26th Jun 2012 01:06 UTC in reply to "RE: A bit misleading"
dvhh Member since:
2006-03-20

Anyone sending you mail to your facebook address ?

Reply Score: 5

RE[3]: A bit misleading
by libray on Tue 26th Jun 2012 01:40 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: A bit misleading"
libray Member since:
2005-08-27

Not sure how to answer your question except:

I have a facebook address?!

How would I know if email is sent there or not? Just wait around for deliveries (if indeed facebook is able to forward someplace) and read all the headers of all messages from now on?

Should I ask possible senders if they sent me email via facebook? How do I find those senders?

I just tried to send to my facebook account... whoops, they block my ip due to PBL, something my originally listed domain's mx does not use...


% host -t mx facebook.com
facebook.com mail is handled by 10 smtpin.mx.facebook.com.

% host smtpin.mx.facebook.com.
smtpin.mx.facebook.com has address 69.171.244.11

% telnet 69.171.244.11 25
'Trying 69.171.244.11...
Connected to 69.171.244.11.
Escape character is '^]'.
554 5.7.1 POL-P1 http://www.spamhaus.org/query/bl?ip=xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx
Connection to 69.171.244.11 closed by foreign host.

Reply Score: 3

Wow
by HappyGod on Tue 26th Jun 2012 00:49 UTC
HappyGod
Member since:
2005-10-19

I thought nobody was ever going to beat Apple's secret Safari installs via their update utility.

But we have a new champion! Take a bow Facebook.

Facebook, if you're reading this; These tactics DON'T WORK. All they do is piss off your customers.

Reply Score: 3

RE: Wow
by Morgan on Tue 26th Jun 2012 02:25 UTC in reply to "Wow"
Morgan Member since:
2005-06-29

All they do is piss off your customers.


No they don't. I thought everyone knew by now that Facebook's actual customers are the advertising partners, who are probably loving this.

The users aren't customers, they are the product being sold to the advertisers.

Reply Score: 14

RE[2]: Wow
by libray on Tue 26th Jun 2012 02:37 UTC in reply to "RE: Wow"
libray Member since:
2005-08-27

Amen brother!

Reply Score: 2

RE[2]: Wow
by earksiinni on Tue 26th Jun 2012 04:46 UTC in reply to "RE: Wow"
earksiinni Member since:
2009-03-27

Precisely. I made the same point about Kindles a while ago: http://www.whatdigitalrevolution.com/?p=202&page=3

Reply Score: 2

RE[3]: Wow
by WorknMan on Tue 26th Jun 2012 05:14 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Wow"
WorknMan Member since:
2005-11-13

Precisely. I made the same point about Kindles a while ago


I have one word for you: Unswindle. That'll solve just about all of your Kindle problems ;)

Reply Score: 2

Comment by sagum
by sagum on Tue 26th Jun 2012 01:09 UTC
sagum
Member since:
2006-01-23

If it wasn't for the fact that I make use of facebook's one click sign in for a lot of sites, I'd not bother logging into it at all.

Unfortunatly I have friends and family who, prefer not to use email anyway and the only way to contact them online is via facebook. For them, email is just an annonyance of setting up their facebook account, and I'm pretty sure if you sign up via mobile you can just use your phone number now. I've logged in using my mobile number a few times in the past.

So, based on the above, I struggle to see how most people will care. Its not as if they even check their email inbox anyway.

For the rest of us who would use the network and did have a prefered email for contact, its not a good thing. What's next they require you to login with it? or maybe they'll buy a few billion phone numbers and issue everyone their own personal facebook sms number to use.

If it was a EU or UK company, they'd have not got away with this under the data protection act.

Reply Score: 4

par for the course
by benali72 on Tue 26th Jun 2012 03:57 UTC
benali72
Member since:
2008-05-03

Hate to say it, but anybody naive enough about FB to be surprised by this deserves what they get. Look at the folks posting here who don't get it. Caveat emptor.

Reply Score: 0

RE: par for the course
by vaette on Tue 26th Jun 2012 13:13 UTC in reply to "par for the course"
vaette Member since:
2008-08-09

Yes, I, who am a Facebook user, has certainly been shown the error of my ways. How dare they give me a free email address? How dare they give people who visit my profile on Facebook a way to contact me on Facebook? Hiding my main email address is a slightly icky move, but this is hardly the day of reckoning for Facebook users. Don't be so dramatic.

Reply Score: 2

Comment by Luminair
by Luminair on Tue 26th Jun 2012 05:41 UTC
Luminair
Member since:
2007-03-30

I find facebook (and the products and services that connect to it) to be invasive and creepy. off-putting

Reply Score: 4

Interesting...
by AnythingButVista on Tue 26th Jun 2012 13:43 UTC
AnythingButVista
Member since:
2008-08-27

My @facebook.com "email address" appears in my information but under privacy it lists "Only me", while my real email address appears as displayed to "Friends". I might have done something to explicitly hide the fake email from Facebook, I can't remember when but I'm not affected by this latest change. But then again, I'm still enjoying my classic timeline-free profile.

Reply Score: 3

Definitely unethical
by theosib on Tue 26th Jun 2012 14:38 UTC
theosib
Member since:
2006-03-02

However, we all know that Facebook makes ALL of its money from advertising and it maximizes its profit via extensive datamining. This is a fact of doing business.

So rather than whine and cry about Facebook's unethical behavior, I personally just limit my usage. I have little more than my professional info on there, stuff that is publically available on other web sites anyway.

Reply Score: 2

Comment by marcp
by marcp on Tue 26th Jun 2012 18:28 UTC
marcp
Member since:
2007-11-23

The problem is not a FB mail service itself, but the fact that they are actually forcing their users to use whatever FB likes them to use.
Now, I'm not a FB user [I find their policies way too restrictive], but I can actually imagine a point of view where this is not a problem. One could always say: "well, you got what you agreed with. Terms of use accepted? don't whine now".

Reply Score: 2

Semantics
by Drunkula on Tue 26th Jun 2012 18:34 UTC
Drunkula
Member since:
2009-09-03

Scummy? Maybe slightly. Scam - no.

Reply Score: 2

v 1
by Anonymous on Tue 3rd Jul 2012 19:34 UTC
v 1
by Anonymous on Thu 5th Jul 2012 12:27 UTC