Linked by Thom Holwerda on Fri 29th Jun 2012 16:33 UTC
Windows HP has told Bloomberg reporter Dina Bass that the company has no plans to sell ARM-based Windows 8 tablets initially (thanks, The Verge) - it will only do x86 tablets. This may actually explain why Microsoft is getting into the business of selling its own tablets: other than Asus, not a single company has announced a Windows ARM tablet. Pretty abysmal start for Windows RT.
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by Hiev on Fri 29th Jun 2012 16:45 UTC
Hiev
Member since:
2005-09-27

Dear HP, go with Android, Windows is the past, believe me, you won't make money out of Windows 8 tables.

Reply Score: 2

Thomas2005 Member since:
2005-11-07

Having an ARM-powered notebook would be nice, but having to go from typing on the keyboard to touching the screen will be an inconvenience at the least.

To cycle through the apps there should be a key combo like ctrl+right|left arrow.

Do we really have to touch the screen to bring up the search box, type the search with the keyboard, then touch the screen again to start the search?

Edited 2012-06-29 18:02 UTC

Reply Score: 1

tanzam75 Member since:
2011-05-19

To cycle through the apps there should be a key combo like ctrl+right|left arrow.


To cycle through running apps, press Alt-Tab. Same key combination that's been in use since Windows 1.0. After that, you can use the left and right arrows if you prefer. Both Metro and non-Metro apps show up on the window switcher.

To cycle through only Metro apps, press Winkey-Tab.

Do we really have to touch the screen to bring up the search box, type the search with the keyboard, then touch the screen again to start the search?


No, you don't.

To launch apps by searching, press the Windows key and start typing -- just as you've been able to do it since Windows Vista. Then use the arrow keys to select, and Enter to launch.

Type Winkey + F to search files. This key combination was introduced in Windows 95.

Type Winkey + W to search settings (Control Panel applets). This is new -- and I don't understand why they chose W.

Reply Score: 3

ronaldst Member since:
2005-06-29

Thom also forgot that Microsoft selected 3 OEMs to make WoA tablets. I think the third one was Samsung.

Chips were from TI, NVIDIA and Qualcomm.

Reply Score: 3

some1 Member since:
2010-10-05

Yeah, but you can supposedly buy it with Ubuntu, ChromeOs or Android for $85 less.

Reply Score: 1

westlake Member since:
2010-01-07

Yeah, but you can supposedly buy it with Ubuntu, ChromeOs or Android for $85 less.


WinRT will ship with MS Office Home & Student.

Office Home & Student is the #1 bestseller in OSX and Windows software.

The tail the wags the dog.

Reply Score: 2

holivega Member since:
2009-10-14

Great, now you have to install anti-virus software on your tablet!

Reply Score: 4

viton Member since:
2005-08-09

After Toshiba AC100 I do not believe in anything worthwhile from Toshiba. It is a mess of hacks and kludges. Both in hardware and software.

Edited 2012-06-30 02:41 UTC

Reply Score: 2

It's amazing
by reduz on Fri 29th Jun 2012 18:58 UTC
reduz
Member since:
2006-02-25

How much can Microsoft push vendors to create the products they want for Windows or Windows Phone, and even push vendors to not use Android... and so far it's been all failures.

At the same time, Android is extremely popular and we believe Google is not pushing vendors enough, resulting in fragmentation.

Reply Score: 2

RT is an OEM version
by jefro on Fri 29th Jun 2012 20:08 UTC
jefro
Member since:
2007-04-13

If MS is marketing RT as an OEM version then why would they care so much about making a product of their own. The OS is for OEM's.

Reply Score: 2

RE: RT is an OEM version
by 0brad0 on Fri 29th Jun 2012 20:29 UTC in reply to "RT is an OEM version"
0brad0 Member since:
2007-05-05

If MS is marketing RT as an OEM version then why would they care so much about making a product of their own. The OS is for OEM's.


Kinda hard for Windows RT to be successful when they can't get anyone to create the HW so they're doing it themselves. Microsoft is the OEM. Do you not know what OEM means?

Reply Score: 2

This is old news
by Nelson on Fri 29th Jun 2012 22:19 UTC
Nelson
Member since:
2005-11-29

This has been known for a while, HP only really came out and admitted it today. It predates the Surface announcement.

Microsoft is purposely limited the launch OEMs for Surface because of the varying degrees of readiness of chipset support. A Tegra is wildly different from a Snapdragon which is different from an OMAP. A fact lost on some people when hearing the umbrella term "ARM".

IIRC, there are only a handful of OEMs given the green light for Windows RT. Nokia is presumably somewhere in the mix working with Qualcomm. I know ASUS is working with nVidea and Toshiba is working with TI.

I don't think Windows RT is as ready for prime time as people would like to think. It would explain the buggy demos, the limited hands on, etc.

Reply Score: 2