Linked by Thom Holwerda on Sat 14th Jul 2012 17:52 UTC
Multimedia, AV "We have been keeping a little secret.... The kind that is so much fun to share when the time comes. Today we announce XBMC for Android. Not a remote, not a thin client; the real deal. No root or jailbreak required. XBMC can be launched as an application on your set-top-box, tablet, phone, or wherever else Android may be found." So, this just made Google TV useful, right?
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Ouya killer app.
by sergio on Sat 14th Jul 2012 23:36 UTC
sergio
Member since:
2005-07-06

I think XBMC could be the Ouya killer app.

http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/ouya/ouya-a-new-kind-of-video-g...

Reply Score: 3

RE: Ouya killer app.
by Soulbender on Sun 15th Jul 2012 02:25 UTC in reply to "Ouya killer app."
Soulbender Member since:
2005-08-18

So the killer app for a game console is to watch videos?

Reply Score: 2

RE[2]: Ouya killer app.
by sergio on Sun 15th Jul 2012 02:47 UTC in reply to "RE: Ouya killer app."
sergio Member since:
2005-07-06

Well, back in the day, one of the PS2 killer apps was playing DVD-video discs. xD

Reply Score: 5

RE[3]: Ouya killer app.
by UltraZelda64 on Sun 15th Jul 2012 13:23 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Ouya killer app."
UltraZelda64 Member since:
2006-12-05

My "killer app" for a video game system was always playing games. When other people were jizzing in their pants over the ability to use their PS2 as a cheap DVD player, I laughed and considered it nothing more than a way to shorten the life of the system's DVD-ROM drive, thereby reducing the life of the system to do what it was meant to do to begin with--play games. I still view it that way; I would never stick a DVD movie in a gaming console. Similarly, I would not use my Wii to watch Netflix, either, and would only consider minor exceptions to using a Web browser (you can actually do some minor gaming-related things, like going to GameFAQS for example).

Maybe I'm old-fashioned, but I like my gaming systems to exceed with what they do best... everything gaming. Which probably explains why I have been steadily distancing away from gaming after the GameCube, and further with "New Xbox Experience" bullshit. Nintendo was the one company I could always count on, but with the latest portable DS systems (which I lost track of) even they're heading on a path toward never-ending non-gaming "features".

I don't know much about the Wii U, but I'm guessing it continues the trend--though maybe not to the extreme that Microsoft and Sony take it.

Reply Score: 2

RE[4]: Ouya killer app.
by Jondice on Sun 15th Jul 2012 15:55 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: Ouya killer app."
Jondice Member since:
2006-09-20

I mostly agree with you, though hacking systems can be fun.

This is all the more reason to do PC gaming these days; all a console gets you is sub-par hardware locked down tighter than Fort Knox, and no Steam sales.

Of course, co-op/multiplayer same-room gaming is always fun on consoles, but the number and type of games that support this is becoming limited since publishers apparently think it is more lucrative to sell network-only co-op games so that everyone has to buy a copy.

Reply Score: 1

RE[5]: Ouya killer app.
by zima on Sat 21st Jul 2012 23:59 UTC in reply to "RE[4]: Ouya killer app."
zima Member since:
2005-07-06

all a console gets you is

free from fiddling (with drivers, OS, and such) couch experience (not limited to one couch - its variant of portability). Even better around ~pub time (yeah, maybe the proportions of such games have declined, but what matters is the presence of sufficient number of good ones - and that includes titles from a generation or two ago, they are still damn good)

And overall, only recently an average inexpensive PC (which means a laptop with integrated gfx) became comparable to present-gen console.

Edited 2012-07-22 00:07 UTC

Reply Score: 2

RE[4]: Ouya killer app.
by Kivada on Sun 15th Jul 2012 16:04 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: Ouya killer app."
Kivada Member since:
2010-07-07

Gaming hardware is more or less general purpose these days for the simple fact that it makes them more appealing to more people, most don't want a half dozen single use devices that they have to find a way to connect to a TV that only has 2-3 inputs, they don't want another device drawing more power, putting out more heat and having more LED lights that always seem to be pointed directly into your retina when you are trying to watch a watching a movie in a dark room.

And the console companies know this, they are moving more and more toward making the console what it is, a dedicated HTPC, in the next gen or 2 we will likely see them add a cable card so they can have full DVR capability.

The only problem with game consoles from the big companies is that they are designed to be walled garden devices.

It's why I've been wondering for some time now why a company like AMD hasn't whipped up a game console, they halve all the necessary tech to make a very good one. All they'd need to do is hire someone to mod up a BSD for them so they can still allow for a more or less open platform to upstart developers from the PC gaming world, but still be able to appease the media companies and the console game companies that think DRM does anything.

Since the hardware would be more or less standard off the shelf x86 hardware each year they could slash production costs via die shrinks while keeping the same level of performance over the console's 5 year generational lifespan.

Reply Score: 2

RE[5]: Ouya killer app.
by zima on Sun 15th Jul 2012 19:39 UTC in reply to "RE[4]: Ouya killer app."
zima Member since:
2005-07-06

Without being a walled garden, consoles would possibly lose a large part of reasons why people get them (particularly now that they are networked). A successful console is much more than good tech (Dreamcast was quite good tech-wise, but...)

An open platform console would probably end up much more expensive up-front than competition, the model of subsidizing hardware being less viable on it. Hence hardly anybody would buy it, hence no support of big games, and/or more traditional makers would do some sweet deals with publishers. So we'd probably end up with effects reminiscent of those leading to 1983 video game crash, but limited to that one console (Atari 2600 was also quite open, as far as publishing games went; the idea of closed systems is what revitalised the landscape...)

BTW, present consoles also slash production costs by die shrinks (generally, revisions - die shrinks don't come as often as you paint it, every year), and generations now last (and likely will continue to last) longer than 5 years.

Reply Score: 2

RE[6]: Ouya killer app.
by Kivada on Sun 15th Jul 2012 19:43 UTC in reply to "RE[5]: Ouya killer app."
Kivada Member since:
2010-07-07

the problem is though that they've walled up so much that it's very hard to almost impossible for an unknown game developer to break into the console market, Which is a terrible thing since they are usually the only ones producing good games, since the big guys keep rehashing the same tired old games with new graphics every few months.

As for the hardware, true, there are die shrinks on all hardware, but the main difference is that when you are using custom hardware like the PS3, you end up reliant on a company that doesn't really care about your product line, this is what happened with IBM for the PS3's Cell and Apple's G5 PPC Macs, IBM didn't care enough about this low end hardware, it was distracting them from their own high end server line which they deemed more important to their own bottom line.

As before though, you get the added benefit that there isn't a game dev on earth that can't write for x86.

Edited 2012-07-15 19:51 UTC

Reply Score: 2

RE[7]: Ouya killer app.
by zima on Sun 15th Jul 2012 20:18 UTC in reply to "RE[6]: Ouya killer app."
zima Member since:
2005-07-06

It's not too bad, I think - with Xbox Live Arcade, Live Indie Games, or Apple Appstore, we have enough entry-level venues accessible to small devs.

But don't mythologise "unknown game developer" versus "the big guys" like that - rehashing the same tired old games was always more the rule than the exception. Most indie games are like that too, and generally not worth much.

WRT hardware: and yet, when looking at IBM-provided PPC tech in general, all console makers choose it, and continue to choose it (Wii U so far) - so I doubt the things you see are really a problem. It's not like the development of specific product line is that important (such development is what IBM abandoned, not PPC or die-shrinks in general), with console hw being set per generation.
Also, not many devs really target x86 specifically... it's mostly just what happens to be in most PCs, on what the most popular OS happens to run, and what the compiler targets.

Reply Score: 2

RE[4]: Ouya killer app.
by zima on Sun 15th Jul 2012 19:17 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: Ouya killer app."
zima Member since:
2005-07-06

I laughed and considered it nothing more than a way to shorten the life of the system's DVD-ROM drive, thereby reducing the life of the system to do what it was meant to do to begin with--play games. I still view it that way; I would never stick a DVD movie in a gaming console

Though playing CDs and, I imagine, DVDs differs a bit from reading game disks - it's very linear, with little seeks, and relatively permissive of read errors (with audio CDs, the drive will just skip it or repeat the preceding fragment; those are typically small fractions of a second, which we don't even hear). Quite easy on the drives, overall.
(and as far as personal anecdotes go - playing audio CDs on my PS1 didn't harm the longevity of its drive)

Reply Score: 5

RE[5]: Ouya killer app.
by Kivada on Sun 15th Jul 2012 19:54 UTC in reply to "RE[4]: Ouya killer app."
Kivada Member since:
2010-07-07

Very true, it was your idiot brother that yanked on the disk to get it out till he damaged the spindle that damaged the PSOne drives, if you taped down the disc it would still read fine though, my Dualshock edition PSOne still works fine today after more then a decade of use.

Reply Score: 2

RE[6]: Ouya killer app.
by zima on Sun 15th Jul 2012 20:02 UTC in reply to "RE[5]: Ouya killer app."
zima Member since:
2005-07-06

Yanked on the... what?! ;)

And I believe all PSOne shipped with Dualshock, it was introduced as standard already in some late "classic" angular PS1 models.

Reply Score: 2

RE[7]: Ouya killer app.
by Kivada on Mon 16th Jul 2012 03:58 UTC in reply to "RE[6]: Ouya killer app."
Kivada Member since:
2010-07-07

you never had someone pull on the disc weird and crack the plastic of the spindle so that the ball bearings that where part of the disc holding mechanism fell out did you?

I saw this kill a great many playstations.

the original launch version of the playstation didn't have dualshock controllers, the controller looked very similar, but it had no sticks. Because of this almost no playstation games actually required the sticks, one of the few is Ape Escape, which required said sticks else the game was unplayable.

Reply Score: 2

RE[4]: Ouya killer app.
by sergio on Sun 15th Jul 2012 22:21 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: Ouya killer app."
sergio Member since:
2005-07-06

I agree with you 101%, I love game-only consoles and I don't care about playing videos in a console at all.

But, What We think is not always representative of what the market or the common people think.

History tell us that DVD playback was a very strong reason to buy a PS2 (same with Blu-Ray/PS3).

That's why I suspect that XBMC could be a killer app for Ouya.

Reply Score: 2

RE[4]: Ouya killer app.
by Bill Shooter of Bul on Mon 16th Jul 2012 03:58 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: Ouya killer app."
Bill Shooter of Bul Member since:
2006-07-14

Maybe I'm old-fashioned, but I like my gaming systems to exceed with what they do best... everything gaming.


No, you just don't like getting a lot of value for your money by using gadgets to their fullest, but enjoy laughing at people who do. I don't know much about gamers, but thats as un hacker as you can get. I'm not quite sure why someone like you is visiting OSNews. Most visitors enjoy doing things like installing software that was never meant to be on hardware, and using it in unique ways to explore the possibilities. Yes sometimes this occasionally ends up in heaps of smoldering electronics, but as a smart man once said " Science can't move forward without heaps!".

Reply Score: 2

RE[4]: Ouya killer app.
by lucas_maximus on Mon 16th Jul 2012 09:02 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: Ouya killer app."
lucas_maximus Member since:
2009-08-18

When other people were jizzing in their pants over the ability to use their PS2 as a cheap DVD player, I laughed and considered it nothing more than a way to shorten the life of the system's DVD-ROM drive, thereby reducing the life of the system to do what it was meant to do to begin with--play games. I still view it that way;


WHAT. You do know that the main thing that killed most PS2 drives was GTA: San Andreas.

I been using my ps2 as a DVD player for ages ... that and the upscaler on my Television being pretty damn good, I not needed to buy HD films.

Also the PS2 playback of DVD was fantastic, I think it even supported RGB colour.

TBH it bloody silly not to take advantage of the fantastic DVD playback the PS2 offered at the time.

Reply Score: 4

RE[5]: Ouya killer app.
by Yoko_T on Mon 16th Jul 2012 15:11 UTC in reply to "RE[4]: Ouya killer app."
Yoko_T Member since:
2011-08-18

" When other people were jizzing in their pants over the ability to use their PS2 as a cheap DVD player, I laughed and considered it nothing more than a way to shorten the life of the system's DVD-ROM drive, thereby reducing the life of the system to do what it was meant to do to begin with--play games. I still view it that way;


WHAT. You do know that the main thing that killed most PS2 drives was GTA: San Andreas.

I been using my ps2 as a DVD player for ages ... that and the upscaler on my Television being pretty damn good, I not needed to buy HD films.

Also the PS2 playback of DVD was fantastic, I think it even supported RGB colour.

TBH it bloody silly not to take advantage of the fantastic DVD playback the PS2 offered at the time.
"

The person you're responding to is a complete idiot. I used my PS2 as a dvd player for ages and still do with absolutely no problems. The PS2 was one of the few things Sony got right.

Reply Score: 2

RE[6]: Ouya killer app.
by lucas_maximus on Mon 16th Jul 2012 16:35 UTC in reply to "RE[5]: Ouya killer app."
lucas_maximus Member since:
2009-08-18

I gleaned that as well.

Reply Score: 2

RE[3]: Ouya killer app.
by Speaktrap on Sun 15th Jul 2012 17:01 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Ouya killer app."
Speaktrap Member since:
2012-06-13

Actually, XBMC was the killer app of original Xbox. When Microsoft discontinued Xbox in favour of Xbox 360, it's price felt so low, that buying and hacking an Xbox was the cheapest way for a media center... and probably the best one back then.

Reply Score: 2

RE[4]: Ouya killer app.
by Luminair on Sun 15th Jul 2012 18:58 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: Ouya killer app."
Luminair Member since:
2007-03-30

halo was the killer app of xbox, not xbmc

Reply Score: 3

RE[5]: Ouya killer app.
by Kivada on Sun 15th Jul 2012 19:56 UTC in reply to "RE[4]: Ouya killer app."
Kivada Member since:
2010-07-07

Wrong, before XBMC, Halo was the ONLY reason to get an XBox.

Reply Score: 2

RE[6]: Ouya killer app.
by zima on Mon 16th Jul 2012 04:36 UTC in reply to "RE[5]: Ouya killer app."
zima Member since:
2005-07-06

Panzer Dragoon Orta, Steel Battalion, ...Dead or Alive Xtreme Beach Volleyball?! ;)

Reply Score: 2

RE[7]: Ouya killer app.
by Kivada on Mon 16th Jul 2012 05:03 UTC in reply to "RE[6]: Ouya killer app."
Kivada Member since:
2010-07-07

...Dead or Alive Xtreme Beach Volleyball?! ;)


lol perv. Yeah, the XBox has been more friendly to pervy titles.

Though the PS2 had Rez, the Japanese version of which came with an interesting little addon for our girl gamers... Slightly NSFW http://www.gamegirladvance.com/2002/10/sex-in-games-rezvibrator.htm...

Reply Score: 2

RE[6]: Ouya killer app.
by Luminair on Tue 17th Jul 2012 04:29 UTC in reply to "RE[5]: Ouya killer app."
Luminair Member since:
2007-03-30

you need to work on your english

Reply Score: 2

RE[2]: Ouya killer app.
by Radio on Sun 15th Jul 2012 08:10 UTC in reply to "RE: Ouya killer app."
Radio Member since:
2009-06-20

So the killer app for a game console is to watch videos?

Yes, because it is already plugged to the TV. Would you rather have one more cable?

Reply Score: 5

what exactly does xmbc mean
by sherriffwoody on Sun 15th Jul 2012 05:00 UTC
sherriffwoody
Member since:
2012-05-25

Duplicate

Edited 2012-07-15 05:04 UTC

Reply Score: 1

what exactly does xbmc mean
by sherriffwoody on Sun 15th Jul 2012 05:03 UTC
sherriffwoody
Member since:
2012-05-25

What will this allow us to do on the likes of android?

Reply Score: 1

RE: what exactly does xbmc mean
by kompak on Sun 15th Jul 2012 05:48 UTC in reply to "what exactly does xbmc mean"
kompak Member since:
2011-06-14

watch videos?

Reply Score: 2

Re:
by kurkosdr on Sun 15th Jul 2012 11:35 UTC
kurkosdr
Member since:
2011-04-11

This makes it more urgent to find an Android phone that allows third-party apps to use the video hardware acceleration.

Software decoding might be OK for Ouya, but for mobile devices (phones, tablets) it's going to be a killer for the battery. Not to mention the fact many single-core phones will not go above 720p.

Even the Nexus phones are full of proprietary userland apps and binary blobs, so their hardware acceleration is not open. Overzealous open source advocates who claimed Android "is open source" and blamed the binary blobs on OEMs and carriers, are now getting strangled by facts. Just because Google dumps part of Android's source, it doesn't mean it's open source. It's mixed-model.

Edited 2012-07-15 11:36 UTC

Reply Score: 2

RE: Re:
by Soulbender on Sun 15th Jul 2012 12:14 UTC in reply to "Re:"
Soulbender Member since:
2005-08-18

Not to mention the fact many single-core phones will not go above 720p.


Does that even matter on a tiny phone screen?

Reply Score: 4

Re: Not Ready Yet
by dmck on Sun 15th Jul 2012 12:36 UTC in reply to "RE: Re:"
dmck Member since:
2006-11-02

I tried out the pre-beta yesterday and although the video played Ok the audio is choppy.

No hardware acceleration yet.

Reply Score: 1

RE[2]: Re:
by Elv13 on Sun 15th Jul 2012 18:39 UTC in reply to "RE: Re:"
Elv13 Member since:
2006-06-12

If the video file is 1080p, yes it does, as it wont play

Reply Score: 2

RE[3]: Re:
by zima on Sun 15th Jul 2012 19:26 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Re:"
zima Member since:
2005-07-06

Yes, but I hope we would mostly do it more sensibly ...like serving to handsets a lower-resolution variant (and indeed, virtually all streaming sites do just that), or transcoding HD videos on-the-fly to lower resolution (and smaller size) when copying them from a PC to mobile phone - something that Intel Quick Sync (for one example) apparently aims to do.

Reply Score: 2

modmans2ndcoming
Member since:
2005-11-09

I think this would be fantastic on Google TV devices. XBMC has a lot more flexibility than most other Video application platforms (plex for instance)

Reply Score: 3