Linked by Thom Holwerda on Sat 4th Aug 2012 00:54 UTC
Google This tweet from Tom Warren made me smile. So, it's 2012 and tablets are finally able to do what the Amiga did in 1985. Seems like a bit of a stretch to be excited about that, right? Sure, until I caught myself getting excited - only a bit, but still - by this piece of news. Update: removed me being an annoyed child.
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Random idea
by CajunArson on Sat 4th Aug 2012 02:37 UTC
CajunArson
Member since:
2009-07-16

So for multi-user operating systems you choose... Amiga?
Really? You make it seem like those dudes in 1969 that came up with UNIX used the Delorean (before it was built) to jump forward in time to 1985 to rip off Amiga... oh and Multics, which was already multi-user and over-the-hill when Unix copied some of its parts, must have had a *second* Delorean to go forward in time to 1969 to rip off Unix's copy of the ripped off Amiga multi-user support! Wow.. that's a lot of Deloreans!

Oh.. P.S. --> In addition to me questioning your dubious references... your reference to Amiga is also factually inaccurate since Amiga in 1985 did *not* support multiple users (in fact, much much newer versions of Amiga still don't support multiple users).
Don't believe me? Here's a quote from an article detailing the Fast File system that was not even available in the earlier versions of Amiga:
"There are many bright design ideas making the AmigaOS a very special thing, but the file system was not exactly part of it. It is prone to invalidation, holds redundant data, and its directory structure is comparatively slow to traverse. It also lacks any concept of multi-user environments." See: http://wiki.osdev.org/FFS_%28Amiga%29

If your filesystem doesn't support multi-user access control, then you don't have a multi-user OS, even if there is a stupid login screen for multiple users (which there wasn't BTW).

You seem to have confused *multi-tasking* with *multi-user*. While Amiga did have multi-tasking, that ain't the same thing as a multi-user environment. Oh, and multi-tasking wasn't all that unique since real Unix flavours had already gotten pre-emptive multi-tasking by 1985 anyway.

If you are going to pine for the fjords, why not whine about SkyOS or HURD or some other dead OS that was *really* out there. Amiga was a corporate sellout compared to those guys.

Edited 2012-08-04 02:43 UTC

Reply Score: 6

RE: Random idea
by Yoko_T on Sat 4th Aug 2012 03:01 UTC in reply to "Random idea"
Yoko_T Member since:
2011-08-18

So for multi-user operating systems you choose... Amiga?
Really? You make it seem like those dudes in 1969 that came up with UNIX used the Delorean (before it was built) to jump forward in time to 1985 to rip off Amiga... oh and Multics, which was already multi-user and over-the-hill when Unix copied some of its parts, must have had a *second* Delorean to go forward in time to 1969 to rip off Unix's copy of the ripped off Amiga multi-user support! Wow.. that's a lot of Deloreans!

Oh.. P.S. --> In addition to me questioning your dubious references... your reference to Amiga is also factually inaccurate since Amiga in 1985 did *not* support multiple users (in fact, much much newer versions of Amiga still don't support multiple users).
Don't believe me? Here's a quote from an article detailing the Fast File system that was not even available in the earlier versions of Amiga:
"There are many bright design ideas making the AmigaOS a very special thing, but the file system was not exactly part of it. It is prone to invalidation, holds redundant data, and its directory structure is comparatively slow to traverse. It also lacks any concept of multi-user environments." See: http://wiki.osdev.org/FFS_%28Amiga%29

If your filesystem doesn't support multi-user access control, then you don't have a multi-user OS, even if there is a stupid login screen for multiple users (which there wasn't BTW).

You seem to have confused *multi-tasking* with *multi-user*. While Amiga did have multi-tasking, that ain't the same thing as a multi-user environment. Oh, and multi-tasking wasn't all that unique since real Unix flavours had already gotten pre-emptive multi-tasking by 1985 anyway.

If you are going to pine for the fjords, why not whine about SkyOS or HURD or some other dead OS that was *really* out there. Amiga was a corporate sellout compared to those guys.


The Amiga in 1985 also didn't have usb support,an integrated display,ect,ect,ect.


It's really funny to see these Amiga and Beos fan boys running around acting like the Amiga and Be machines were the machines that most people wanted. They weren't.

In fact they were far from it. In fact if I remember right the Commodore 64 outsold the Amiga during the Amiga's production run.

Reply Score: 2

RE[2]: Random idea
by stew on Sat 4th Aug 2012 08:41 UTC in reply to "RE: Random idea"
stew Member since:
2005-07-06

True. As much as I loved my Amiga, the damn thing didn't have memory protection! At least I don't have to reboot my iPhone when Mobile Safari crashes.

Reply Score: 4

RE[2]: Random idea
by Laurence on Sat 4th Aug 2012 10:39 UTC in reply to "RE: Random idea"
Laurence Member since:
2007-03-26


The Amiga in 1985 also didn't have usb support,an integrated display,ect,ect,ect.


It's really funny to see these Amiga and Beos fan boys running around acting like the Amiga and Be machines were the machines that most people wanted. They weren't.

In fact they were far from it. In fact if I remember right the Commodore 64 outsold the Amiga during the Amiga's production run.

Yeah, because USB was a killer feature on the C64

</sarcasm >

Reply Score: 4

RE[3]: Random idea
by MOS6510 on Sat 4th Aug 2012 18:30 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Random idea"
MOS6510 Member since:
2011-05-12

There weren't any USB devices, so it would have been a Useless Serial Bus I guess.

Reply Score: 6

RE[4]: Random idea
by Laurence on Sat 4th Aug 2012 23:51 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: Random idea"
Laurence Member since:
2007-03-26

There weren't any USB devices

hence the </sarcasm > part of my post ;)

I thought I'd made the context pretty obvious but I guess some people really need everything categorically spelt out for them....

Edited 2012-08-04 23:53 UTC

Reply Score: 2

RE[5]: Random idea
by MOS6510 on Sun 5th Aug 2012 04:29 UTC in reply to "RE[4]: Random idea"
MOS6510 Member since:
2011-05-12

I know and I spend some time thinking of a funny meaning for USB in a world without USB devices!

Reply Score: 3

RE[2]: Random idea
by leech on Sat 4th Aug 2012 16:07 UTC in reply to "RE: Random idea"
leech Member since:
2006-01-10

The Amiga in 1985 also didn't have usb support,an integrated display,ect,ect,ect.


It's really funny to see these Amiga and Beos fan boys running around acting like the Amiga and Be machines were the machines that most people wanted. They weren't.

In fact they were far from it. In fact if I remember right the Commodore 64 outsold the Amiga during the Amiga's production run.


Granted the original post was wrong, Amiga still doesn't have Multi-User support. But 1985? USB? You do realize that USB wasn't even around in 1985? The only ones who had integrated displays were the piece of crap Macs that weren't even color in 1985.

USB wasn't even widely adopted until version 1.1 came out in '98, which is 4 years after Commodore imploded.

For what it's worth, I could get a USB card in my Amiga 4000, and eventually will so I can use an optical mouse with a wheel (probably the one thing that REALLY kills on usability.)

The fact that Amiga and Be both died before their time, and that they still have a decent amount of fans after all this time, goes to show that they are extremely usable operating systems and the light weight approach does have advantages. I'd like to see anything Microsoft has made in the last ten years run with as little resources. Or even software written for a Microsoft operating system that isn't heavily bloated and requires at least 512MB of RAM within the last 10 years.

512MB of RAM is a crapload for AmigaOS, even for AmigaOS4.

I surely miss the days when programmers actually had to optimize their software, because they didn't have Gigabytes of memory to work with. Hell, the company I work for now... there have been rumors that their software is going to start recommending 8GB of RAM to run! That's just insane.

Reply Score: 3

RE[3]: Random idea
by zima on Tue 7th Aug 2012 07:42 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Random idea"
zima Member since:
2005-07-06

The only ones who had integrated displays were the piece of crap Macs that weren't even color in 1985.

Not the only ones, there were some other machines. Though yeah, none as prominent as Macs (OTOH there's also Commodore PET - from an earlier era, but still certainly used in quite large numbers in 1985).
But TBH I kinda preferred B&W in the machines from those times - 16 shades of grey (on a small B&W TV that was only mine, in my room) ultimately looked much better, more "refined" than the 16 colours of C64 (on the TV in a living room), IMHO.

The fact that Amiga and Be both died before their time, and that they still have a decent amount of fans after all this time, goes to show that they are extremely usable operating systems and the light weight approach does have advantages. I'd like to see anything Microsoft has made in the last ten years run with as little resources. Or even software written for a Microsoft operating system that isn't heavily bloated and requires at least 512MB of RAM within the last 10 years.

Windows Mobile, Windows Fundamentals. And there is quite a lot of such light software.
And I wouldn't be surprised if Windows 3.x or, particularly, Windows 95 have much more active users than BeOS and ~Amiga operating systems combined... does that mean you argue the worth of 3.x and 95 even more?

Anyway, requirements of Amiga OS or BeOS were also insane at some point. I certainly don't miss the software from the old days, much more craptastic than is the case now (sure, there's still a lot of crap around - but the point is, you have much greater chances of finding something decent at all, in a given software category; back then, that was less likely)

Edited 2012-08-07 07:47 UTC

Reply Score: 2

RE[4]: Random idea
by Loki_999 on Tue 7th Aug 2012 12:30 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: Random idea"
Loki_999 Member since:
2008-05-06

But TBH I kinda preferred B&W in the machines from those times - 16 shades of grey


I hear they are up to 50 shades now... <,<

Reply Score: 1

RE: Random idea
by Morgan on Sat 4th Aug 2012 04:54 UTC in reply to "Random idea"
Morgan Member since:
2005-06-29

Reading comprehension is your friend, you should really try harder. He wasn't talking about multi-user on the Amiga, he was talking about multi-tasking, an entirely different thing. This was a lead-in to the discussion of multi-user environments on Android and iOS.

Reply Score: 3

RE[2]: Random idea
by CajunArson on Sat 4th Aug 2012 05:13 UTC in reply to "RE: Random idea"
CajunArson Member since:
2009-07-16

My reading comprehension is just fine, but the writing quality of the posters on this site leaves much to be desired. Any rational person who reads the actual words posted in the article in this site would come to the conclusion that Thom is saying that ancient Amiga's had multi-user support that is just now being implemented for the first time ever in a mobile device... which is wrong but not the point.

Thom also posted a link to some random guy's twitter account showing two windows on a Windows 8 tablet... So what....

1. Some idiot "twittering" that he managed to use Windows doesn't mean that earlier mobile devices couldn't multitask since they have been doing it for decades (yes, much much longer than Android or iOS have been around, and yes iOS *does* support pre-emptive multitasking even if Apple prevents garden variety apps from taking full advantage of it),
and

2. The useless Twitter post (aren't they all useless?) that is not part of the text of this story is a logical non-sequitur to the remainder of the story... it looks like you could use some work on reading comprehension and logical reasoning instead of me.

P.S. --> To everyone still holding irrational nostalgia for Amiga, please direct me to all the multi-touch-enabled Amiga devices that had high-speed wireless data connectivity, OpenGL acclerated graphics, and support for 1080p H.264 playback. Amiga was a completely proprietary platform that only worked because Commodore exerted a level of control that makes Apple look like a hippy open-source startup.

The Amiga platform was doomed from the start because it assumed that no improvements to hardware or software were physically possible after 1985, while the "primitive" PC was designed from day 1 with the understanding that technology would progress forward.

Edited 2012-08-04 05:14 UTC

Reply Score: 4

RE[3]: Random idea
by Thom_Holwerda on Sat 4th Aug 2012 05:27 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Random idea"
Thom_Holwerda Member since:
2005-06-29

Uhm, you failed utterly and completely at reading comprehension. My god, this must be me some sort of new record.

Reply Score: 0

RE[4]: Random idea
by flake on Sat 4th Aug 2012 09:03 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: Random idea"
flake Member since:
2012-08-04

It's not a matter of reading comprehension when the material in question doesn't actually state its meaning. You only referred to a tweet obliquely, you didn't actually mention what the tweet was about.

I read that bit about the Amiga the same way. You can't expect everyone to click on every link you post. If people did that, anyone who visited Wikipedia would die of exhaustion after spending 5 days at their computers reading every article that branched off the first one.

When one writes as casually as you do (let's face it, your writing is a far cry from any sort of journalistic standard), their readers are bound to misinterpret something every now and then.

Reply Score: 9

v RE[5]: Random idea
by Thom_Holwerda on Sat 4th Aug 2012 09:34 UTC in reply to "RE[4]: Random idea"
RE[6]: Random idea
by WereCatf on Sat 4th Aug 2012 10:34 UTC in reply to "RE[5]: Random idea"
WereCatf Member since:
2006-02-15

Reading the links is expected on OSNews. This isn't Engadget. When a link is in a story, it's part of the story. Don't complain if you don't understand what a story is about if you only read half of it. That's no my fault - it's yours. I'm not going to spell everything out.


Don't be so hostile, not everything is meant as an insult or an attack on you. The fact is that many people just look at the title and the intro and then proceed to follow the comments -- something that I do, too -- for various reasons, so it might behoove to keep that in mind in the future, aye? Instead of only looking at the article as a whole why not also look at just the title and the intro as a separate entity and check that it conveys enough information about what's going on.

I am not complaining, don't really know about the other commenters, but there's no need to get terribly worked over my comment. I am actually fairly certain I would've made the same mistake, something that one should just take as a learning experience and move on; mistakes and failures and the acceptance of those is the way we grow and improve ourselves.

Reply Score: 6

RE[7]: Random idea
by Thom_Holwerda on Sat 4th Aug 2012 10:51 UTC in reply to "RE[6]: Random idea"
Thom_Holwerda Member since:
2005-06-29

The fact is that many people just look at the title and the intro and then proceed to follow the comments -- something that I do, too -- for various reasons, so it might behoove to keep that in mind in the future, aye? Instead of only looking at the article as a whole why not also look at just the title and the intro as a separate entity and check that it conveys enough information about what's going on.


The thing is - it does. However, if you don't click the links - which, on the web, are an integral part of reading - then my responsibilities really end. I'm willing to put some effort into making sure that those who only read the intros get everything, but when people aren't even going to click the links and want to have everything spelled out in the limited 5-6 lines of an intro, then I'm out. It's ridiculous to expect that of me.

It's basic netiquette to read the entire article before commenting. I'm already pretty cool and all by always making sure all the important links (to the actual news) are in the intro so people aren't forced to read my drivel, but when people aren't even willing to read the links in the first 5-6 lines (!) and just jump straight to commenting, I really have no sympathy if you misunderstood the article. That's not my fault - it's yours for not reading properly.

If you miss the first 15 minutes of a movie, you don't get to complain at the director that the movie sucked because you didn't understand it.

Reply Score: 0

RE[5]: Random idea
by WereCatf on Sat 4th Aug 2012 09:35 UTC in reply to "RE[4]: Random idea"
WereCatf Member since:
2006-02-15

It's not a matter of reading comprehension when the material in question doesn't actually state its meaning. You only referred to a tweet obliquely, you didn't actually mention what the tweet was about.


I actually find myself agreeing; the title specifically talks about multi-user support and the small excerpt doesn't mention anything to the contrary, so I , too, thought he was talking about multi-user.

Reply Score: 8

RE[4]: Random idea
by Carewolf on Sat 4th Aug 2012 09:53 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: Random idea"
Carewolf Member since:
2005-09-08

Well, I had an Amiga and know it had multitasking and never saw any multiuser aspects of it, and am ashamed of agreeing with an obvious troll, but still in my first reading of the article I also thought you were talking about multiuser in Amiga.

Perhaps it is due to the title which makes you think about multiuser features, so the intro a slgihtly different subject end seeming out of place? I dunno, but it was easy to be mistaken.

Reply Score: 6

RE[4]: Random idea
by sbenitezb on Sat 4th Aug 2012 15:45 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: Random idea"
sbenitezb Member since:
2005-07-22

The article has both multiuser and multitasking thrown in in the same paragraph. It's all mixed in and very confusing. I followed the first twitter link expecting multiuser related stuff and found a picture of two Metro apps running at the same time. There is no coherency between the article and the title.

Reply Score: 5

RE[3]: Random idea
by Morgan on Sat 4th Aug 2012 05:27 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Random idea"
Morgan Member since:
2005-06-29

So I'm irrational because I happened to grok the meaning right away and you didn't? You blame your lack of comprehension on the writing skills of a language arts major with a master's degree, who has been writing in English (his second language to my knowledge) for many years, and is far better at it than me and many other native English speakers.

Face it, you misunderstood the article's segue and are scrambling to blame someone else for what, quite honestly, doesn't even matter. No one cares that you didn't catch the meaning right off, except perhaps you.

But just in case you need it for future reference, here is a breakdown of the article flow in layman's terms, with my explanation in braces:

This tweet from Tom Warren {regarding proper multitasking on a tablet} made me smile. So, it's 2012 and tablets are finally able to do what the Amiga did in 1985. {the Amiga could multitask in 1985} Seems like a bit of a stretch to be excited about that, right? Sure, until I caught myself getting excited - only a bit, but still - {here's the segue} by this piece of news. {about multi-user support on Android}

I find it really sad that I had to do that, but I hope it helps you in your future attempts at reading.

Reply Score: 2

RE[4]: Random idea
by vocivus on Sat 4th Aug 2012 09:36 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: Random idea"
vocivus Member since:
2010-03-13

When I RTFP, I thought it was all about mutli-user too. After your clarification I now understand. Admittedly, I'm no genius!

No offense or sarcasm or flaming intended.

Reply Score: 2

RE[4]: Random idea
by sbenitezb on Sat 4th Aug 2012 15:56 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: Random idea"
sbenitezb Member since:
2005-07-22

You blame your lack of comprehension on the writing skills of a language arts major with a master's degree, who has been writing in English (his second language to my knowledge) for many years, and is far better at it than me and many other native English speakers.


A language arts major should know how to properly write a sentence, how to separate topics in different paragraphs and how not to push "Submit" without letting the "writing" settle for a bit.

This "article" of his looks more like an amateurish "publish something" post, no different than a tweet, and completely violates the neutral-view policy of professional journalists. IMO, it's totally out of place for a news site.

Thom, you should take your time to write and review before posting. This is not a blog of yours and I believe all personal opinion on part of the journalists should be in comments, not in the article. State the facts and leave all else to the comments section.

I'm also not a native english speaker, so I apologize if I'm not writing properly.

Reply Score: 4

RE[3]: Random idea
by ncafferkey on Tue 7th Aug 2012 10:22 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Random idea"
ncafferkey Member since:
2006-09-15

Amiga was a completely proprietary platform that only worked because Commodore exerted a level of control that makes Apple look like a hippy open-source startup.


Nonsense. Anyone was allowed to write apps, games or even OS extensions for the Amiga without any interference from Commodore. No payment or permission was necessary.

The Amiga platform was doomed from the start because it assumed that no improvements to hardware or software were physically possible after 1985, while the "primitive" PC was designed from day 1 with the understanding that technology would progress forward.


If anything, that's the wrong way around. Everyone knows the original IBM PC was a cobbled-together POS. 640k limit anyone?

Reply Score: 2

RE[4]: Random idea
by zima on Thu 9th Aug 2012 23:15 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: Random idea"
zima Member since:
2005-07-06

Anyone was allowed to write apps, games or even OS extensions for the Amiga without any interference from Commodore. No payment or permission was necessary.

Arguably, that's exactly what killed the Amiga as a platform - it had very console-like dynamics (most people didn't ever upgrade beyond 500-generation, didn't see the need ...since devs were targeting mostly
500-gen, because that was the fixed baseline everybody had), but without a matching business model: Commodore was expected to sell the largely ~fixed (tech-wise) Amigas at ever lower prices, new models mostly ignored, meanwhile being unable to extract money from dev houses.
Basically just what nearly killed Atari and brought the entire North American market down in the video game crash of 1983 (and C= was largely responsible for this one - it seems they didn't really realise what happened, didn't learn from it the way Nintento did)

> The Amiga platform was doomed from the start because it assumed that no improvements to hardware or software were physically possible after 1985, while the "primitive" PC was designed from day 1 with the understanding that technology would progress forward.

If anything, that's the wrong way around. Everyone knows the original IBM PC was a cobbled-together POS. 640k limit anyone?

No, all its tightly-integrated "niceness" is what killed the Amiga. How PC was cobbled-together is exactly the point: it wasn't so fixed, could improve much more readily. And oh boy it did.
Mixed with economies of scale ( http://arstechnica.com/features/2005/12/total-share/5/ and the next 5 ...if you squint, you can see the share of Amiga there, I promise), R&D distributed among many PC-companies, there was nothing C= could do against such onslaught (maybe except for releasing, early on, an Amiga-derived gfx & sound PC expansion board, and try to make into a standard - but that would be heresy to many Amigans)
PC just turned out to be the better way of doing things - even the present Macs and Amigas are just PCs, really (only, the latter with some weird CPUs for no good reason)

Reply Score: 2

RE[2]: Random idea
by henderson101 on Mon 6th Aug 2012 09:46 UTC in reply to "RE: Random idea"
henderson101 Member since:
2006-05-30

Context is important, there was no context here. Sorry, I'm with the masses - Thom messed up. What Thom did is the same as this:

"The king was in my home town today. He is an idiot. John is still my friend, no matter what."

Who is the idiot? John or the king? Sentences that rely on inside knowledge are unhelpful. Sentences that don't convey enough information are open to misinterpretation.

As another person said miles down a thread, add 3 words:

This tweet from Tom Warren about tablets multitasking made me smile.


Let's also deflate the argument about links - I read the front page news in an RSS feed. There are no links in the body of the RSS feed text, so your argument, and Thom's, is pretty much moot. No excuses, terse is terse. And misleading is misleading no matter how much Thom thinks we should just understand what is in his head. As someone else mentioned, poor journalism shines through on this site recently. No neutral POV or reporting, no objectivity, and falling in to personal Blog territory. If there was another site that dealt with the OS topics in detail, I'd be off here for good. I've been trying to help by submitting as many stories as I can recently (and 3 or so have been featured), but it's like pissing in the wind sometimes.

Reply Score: 3

RE[3]: Random idea
by Morgan on Mon 6th Aug 2012 10:09 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Random idea"
Morgan Member since:
2005-06-29

Context is important, there was no context here. Sorry, I'm with the masses - Thom messed up.


Given the overwhelming minority I seem to be in on this issue, I'm inclined to agree at this point. However, I stand behind my replies to CajunArson because instead of asking for clarification or offering his own interpretation, he out and out attacked Thom with a ton of ultimately irrelevant information about just how non-multi-user Amiga was. He basically said "It appears to me that you said the sky is green, so fuck you and by the way here's five hundred studies saying which exact shade of blue the sky is". I found that to be rude and offensive and I chose to speak up about it.

And I get it, really I do. I've come a long way from the angry nerd I used to be, lashing out at any perceived slight or calling someone stupid because they misspelled a word here or mixed up some terminology there. I was an asshole years ago, but I've grown up. Now, to see someone else (and CajunArson isn't the only one by far) act like the child I used to be, well I chose to educate in my sarcastic way. It turned out that a lot more people were confused by Thom's summary than I thought possible (again, I got it right away but I had also read the tweets, a habit I've always had; it makes reading a Wikipedia article an hours-long adventure sometimes). That is why I haven't commented again on that particular subject until now.

I've been trying to help by submitting as many stories as I can recently (and 3 or so have been featured), but it's like pissing in the wind sometimes.


I've also tried submitting a couple of times, but either Thom already had a similar submission lined up that got posted instead, or (I'm assuming) it wasn't deemed interesting enough to publish. No skin off my nose, I don't take offense to it. If I did, I'd just start my own tech blog and write to my heart's content. Thing is, as much as I work and still try to maintain a social life, I just don't have time to do the heavy lifting. I'm happy with occasionally submitting articles here and at other community-oriented news sites and if something sticks, hey there's my fifteen minutes of fame. ;)

Reply Score: 3

RE[2]: Random idea
by henderson101 on Mon 6th Aug 2012 09:52 UTC in reply to "RE: Random idea"
henderson101 Member since:
2006-05-30

Sorry, but this is what we get int he RSS feed, exactly this, nothing more:

This tweet from Tom Warren made me smile. So, it's 2012 and tablets are finally able to do what the Amiga did in 1985. Seems like a bit of a stretch to be excited about that, right? Sure, until I caught myself getting excited - only a bit, but still - by this piece of news.


Where is the clear change of topic or any indication that the entire paragraph, save last line, is unrelated to the title? None. Doesn't exist. There's are no links, there is no other contextual information. Therefore it is misleading, end of story.

Reply Score: 4

RE[3]: Random idea
by Morgan on Mon 6th Aug 2012 10:14 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Random idea"
Morgan Member since:
2005-06-29

You may want to send an email to Adam or David about that. It may be the way the OSNews code formats the RSS or it could be your reader, and it might behoove you to find out for sure. I'm leaning towards OSNews code myself, since I vaguely remember seeing links but not being able to click on them back when I used RSS readers. I certainly don't think it is intentionally misleading as you suggest; that would be highly counterproductive to the site's existence, and quite silly to boot.

Reply Score: 2

RE: Random idea
by Bill Shooter of Bul on Sat 4th Aug 2012 16:15 UTC in reply to "Random idea"
Bill Shooter of Bul Member since:
2006-07-14

There is a difference between a system being multi-user account, [one user at a time], and multi-simultaneous user account [multiple users using system at one time].

Amega a desktop operating system with one keyboard and monitor attached could not be used by two users at the same time, but did have support for multiple user accounts(Exactly like windows 7 Pro Home desktops today).

Tablets should be simular to that, where its unlikely that two people would ever be able to use it at the same time.

Reply Score: 1

RE[2]: Random idea
by bert64 on Mon 6th Aug 2012 06:57 UTC in reply to "RE: Random idea"
bert64 Member since:
2007-04-23

No, it didn't... AmigaOS had no concept of users, and neither did the filesystem...
You had to use a third party addon like MuFS (multi user filesystem) in order to get any concept of users, and even then it was very easy to bypass the permissions system if you wanted.

It was a single user desktop OS, just like windows, dos, macos and tos were at the time.

Reply Score: 3

RE: Random idea
by AlekosPanagulis on Mon 6th Aug 2012 06:48 UTC in reply to "Random idea"
AlekosPanagulis Member since:
2012-03-19

Oh my god. YOU ARE SUCH A TROLL.

Reply Score: 0

Um. But it did...
by Jesuspower on Sat 4th Aug 2012 02:47 UTC
Jesuspower
Member since:
2006-01-28

IOS, android, webOS, all had 'rudimentary' multi user support. Only the OS itself, but not the GUI.

Still, it had it.

Reply Score: 1

Windows 8
by Nelson on Sat 4th Aug 2012 02:53 UTC
Nelson
Member since:
2005-11-29

Windows 8 probably right now has the best support for multiuser of the tablet OSes.

Reply Score: 2

RE: Windows 8
by TemporalBeing on Mon 6th Aug 2012 18:16 UTC in reply to "Windows 8"
TemporalBeing Member since:
2007-08-22

Windows 8 probably right now has the best support for multiuser of the tablet OSes.


And the worse support for computers overall.

Reply Score: 0

v RE[2]: Windows 8
by Nelson on Mon 6th Aug 2012 21:36 UTC in reply to "RE: Windows 8"
Why?
by p13. on Sat 4th Aug 2012 08:32 UTC
p13.
Member since:
2005-07-10

I'm sure some will say they absolutely need this.
I just don't think it's very useful at all. A phone is inherently "single-user". You don't share a smartphone with many people. As for the whole "work/play" thing ... you don't need multi-user for that. Decently implemented profiles could take care of that.

I just hope they don't start using ACLs on the filesystem (even if it is just POSIX ACLs) because i see many an opportunity for bugs and weird behavior.

Reply Score: 0

RE: Why?
by WereCatf on Sat 4th Aug 2012 09:31 UTC in reply to "Why?"
WereCatf Member since:
2006-02-15

A phone is inherently "single-user".


You totally missed the word "tablet" in there, didn't you? Tablets are often shared among family members, you know.

Reply Score: 4

RE[2]: Why?
by p13. on Sat 4th Aug 2012 11:31 UTC in reply to "RE: Why?"
p13. Member since:
2005-07-10

Even there, it would be of limited use.
I'm sorry, but i just don't see a compelling case for it.

Reply Score: 0

RE[3]: Why?
by WereCatf on Sat 4th Aug 2012 11:43 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Why?"
WereCatf Member since:
2006-02-15

Well, even if you don't see the need for that it's still one of the most-often requested features. Just to throw a few links at you I'll offer these: http://www.slashgear.com/android-multi-user-support-uncovered-in-je... , http://www.androidannoyances.com/post/84 , http://mobilesyrup.com/2012/07/30/multi-user-support-could-be-comin... , http://www.androidauthority.com/multi-user-support-coming-soon-to-a... , http://androidcommunity.com/multi-user-accounts-coming-to-android-t... and so on. You can find comments from people asking for this dating all the way to 2010.

Reply Score: 3

RE[3]: Why?
by No it isnt on Sat 4th Aug 2012 13:32 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Why?"
No it isnt Member since:
2005-11-14

You seriously think sharing your email and IM accounts with your whole family is a good idea? Put it like this: there's not a single compelling case for a single user environment on a tablet, it's harmful and stupid, whereas multi-user is known to actually work.

Of course there's a compelling case for it.

Reply Score: 4

RE[4]: Why?
by leech on Sat 4th Aug 2012 16:30 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: Why?"
leech Member since:
2006-01-10

But don't you know? They want you to buy a tablet for EVERY user!

<sarcasm>
Hey, Microsoft got away with saying that security was so old on Unix platforms, and that 40+ year old tech is just so outdated. Why can't they say that about Multi-user support? I mean why on earth would we want that, it's like wanting everyone to go back to tie-dyed shirts and bell bottoms!
</sarcasm>

Seriously though, there is this weird push for Android to be everywhere (including desktop and laptop) and it really can't get there without some form of multi-user.

Personally it'll be a cold day in hell when I have it on my desktop, but on my HP Touchsmart it may not be too bad. Too bad none of the current builds work on that...

Reply Score: 2

RE[3]: Why?
by phoenix on Sun 5th Aug 2012 09:08 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Why?"
phoenix Member since:
2005-07-11

One word: schools.

School buys 30 tablets, gives them to the socials teacher, who wants to use them with his 4 socials classes. IOW, 4 separate users will be using the tablets.

In a perfect world, each user would have their own, separate account on the tablet, with separate home folders for storing their files, separate e-mail accounts, etc.

Currently, it is next to impossible for students to propely share tablets. iOS, especially, is inherently single-user, to the point of being locked into a single AppleID and e-mail account. Teachers across our district are discovering that tablets are not 'extra portable computers'. Instead, they are single-user, unshareable devices.

Reply Score: 4

RE: Why?
by nefer on Sun 5th Aug 2012 05:56 UTC in reply to "Why?"
nefer Member since:
2012-02-15

I also don't think multi user capabilities on a phone will have widespread use. Its already hard enough for some users to let them use multi-user on a computer, let alone on a phone. :-)

For tablets it does make sense where the tablet is shared.

Reply Score: 1

RE: Why?
by Lobotomik on Mon 6th Aug 2012 09:56 UTC in reply to "Why?"
Lobotomik Member since:
2006-01-03

I would like to point out that while I agree that a cellphone is over 99% personal, it is that what makes control of the remaining 1% extremely important.

Every now and people are forced to lend their device to a coworker/little-daughter/significant-other, for a phone call, or a quick check of the internet, or a pacifying game of Plants vs. Zombies or Cut the Rope. I don't doubt that your own device is squeaky clean of anything questionable, but maybe I would not like to spoil a surprise present to my significant other by being caught browsing jewellery pages, or letting my 6-year old nephew read a stored watsapp chat revealing that Santa is just a fiction.

Even if your moral fiber can defy Mother Theresa's, you might not want to let your little son change the backgrounds, shift the icons, delete your pics or read your email.

I find it hard to accept that it has already taken so long to offer a guest mode in every smartphone. Don't Apple engineers have any concept of privacy? Now, about Google engineers... I won't bother ask the same question.

Edited 2012-08-06 09:58 UTC

Reply Score: 4

RE: Why?
by zima on Sat 11th Aug 2012 23:59 UTC in reply to "Why?"
zima Member since:
2005-07-06

A phone is inherently "single-user"

Sharing of mobile phones is quite common in some areas, existing multi-user capabilities of phones are already widely used.

For example http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mobile_phone#Use_of_mobile_phones
In parts of the world, mobile phone sharing is common. It is prevalent in urban India, as families and groups of friends often share one or more mobiles among their members. There are obvious economic benefits, but often familial customs and traditional gender roles play a part.[39] For example, in Burkina Faso, it is not uncommon for a village to have access to only one mobile phone. The phone is typically owned by a person who is not natively from the village, such as a teacher or missionary, but it is expected that other members of the village are allowed to use the cell phone to make necessary calls.[40]

And if you'd go to conversations.nokia.com and search for (IIRC) Nokia 1280 for example (not the only one, there are "higher" models like that; or search some keywords around mobile phones and developing world, emerging markets, the next billion), you'd see that many phones can have few separate accounts for contacts, messages, call management timers and counters - specifically to be shared.

Yes, it's not exactly about what we think of as smartphones, but a) what is a smartphone, anyway? (inexpensive, sub-40€ without contract, S40 phones also have apps, are also used for browsing: http://www.opera.com/smw/2011/11/ ) b) Android will trickle down to price brackets in question (and there are still cultural factors)

Edited 2012-08-12 00:19 UTC

Reply Score: 2

Welcome to bloated mobile OSes!
by sergio on Sat 4th Aug 2012 08:42 UTC
sergio
Member since:
2005-07-06

Hey! Let's begin to ask for stupid and unnecessary features on mobile OSes too!! Yeah!!

Ruining PCs and Mac was not enough! We want more shit! xD

IMHO Android guys have to improve the performance of their OS on tablets... even my iPad 1 feels faster and snappier than many 2012 Android tablets.

Reply Score: 1

WereCatf Member since:
2006-02-15

Hey! Let's begin to ask for stupid and unnecessary features on mobile OSes too!! Yeah!!


Multi-user support is hardly a stupid or unnecessary feature, though; many families only buy one tablet that is shared between all the residents, but since there is no proper multi-user support when one makes a change to something it applies to all the aforementioned residents. Similarly, many corporations are forced to supply each and every employee with a tablet instead of allowing them to share one.

IMHO Android guys have to improve the performance of their OS on tablets... even my iPad 1 feels faster and snappier than many 2012 Android tablets.


Looking at your comment and the ignorance displayed I'm gonna go on a limb here and just assume you're trying to troll, or you're just being blinded by rose-tinted glasses. Either way your credibility is rather low.

Reply Score: 5

KISS
by sergio on Sat 4th Aug 2012 12:51 UTC in reply to "RE: Welcome to bloated mobile OSes!"
sergio Member since:
2005-07-06

Well, I think that keeping it simple and fast is way more important than adding dubious features. I'm an old fashioned unix guy you know.

I used an Asus Transformer and I felt it pretty slow compared to my crappy iPad 1. The Asus has 3x or 4x more power than my iPad... It should fly... but It doesn't.

And I know that saying anything against Android in OSnews decreases my credibility and turns me into a "troll", but I don't care, I'm not a politician. xD

Reply Score: 1

RE: KISS
by No it isnt on Sat 4th Aug 2012 13:34 UTC in reply to "KISS"
No it isnt Member since:
2005-11-14

You're an old-fashioned Unix guy and think multi-user is unnecessary bloat, and that it has any impact whatsoever on speed? Somehow I don't believe you.

Reply Score: 4

RE[2]: KISS
by sergio on Sat 4th Aug 2012 18:04 UTC in reply to "RE: KISS"
sergio Member since:
2005-07-06

I think that adding multi-user support to a mobile OS is not a priority at all.

Android developers should focus on performance. iOS is way ahead in this particular matter, It feels faster even using slower hardware.

Reply Score: 2

RE[3]: KISS
by No it isnt on Sat 4th Aug 2012 19:57 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: KISS"
No it isnt Member since:
2005-11-14

Smoother, not faster. There's more to OS performance than scrolling and transitions.

Reply Score: 4

RE[4]: KISS
by sergio on Sat 4th Aug 2012 20:30 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: KISS"
sergio Member since:
2005-07-06

I'd think you are right, I don't know enough about Android internals to tell you why It feels slow. I speak from an end user pov here.

I love the hardware of Android devices, they are way ahead of expensive Apple offerings... but when you actually use the devices they feel much slower than even vintage iOS devices. It's shocking.

And I fear that multi-user support will increase this slowness, actually... I'm pretty sure of that because I dealt with multiuser issues during my career.

I mean, the device will have to store the state of the session when you switch between users (running apps, configs, connections, ecc)... Android has to keep that state in memory somehow, in RAM or swap it to the flash memory... It's not a minor concern, It can be very resource hungry.

Then you have the file owner/permission issue. You don't want that your files can be modified by another user. Android will have to implement that too.

That's why I think adding multiuser support to a mobile OS is a big fat stupid idea. Good multiuser support is a complex thing. It's not trivial nor "free". KISS.

Reply Score: 1

RE[5]: KISS
by WereCatf on Sat 4th Aug 2012 21:17 UTC in reply to "RE[4]: KISS"
WereCatf Member since:
2006-02-15

And I fear that multi-user support will increase this slowness, actually... I'm pretty sure of that because I dealt with multiuser issues during my career.


Does your Windows, Mac or Linux device slow down as you add more and more user accounts on it?

I mean, the device will have to store the state of the session when you switch between users (running apps, configs, connections, ecc)... Android has to keep that state in memory somehow, in RAM or swap it to the flash memory... It's not a minor concern, It can be very resource hungry.


Of course the state would be saved in the permanent storage, there would be no benefit from keeping it in RAM at all times except when you switch users, and well, that's not something you do every few minutes. It doesn't consume resources after it's been saved to storage.

Then you have the file owner/permission issue. You don't want that your files can be modified by another user. Android will have to implement that too.


ext2/3/4 filesystem already handles that, Google only needs to check that Android itself uses those. It's not as large an issue as you seem to believe.

That's why I think adding multiuser support to a mobile OS is a big fat stupid idea. Good multiuser support is a complex thing. It's not trivial nor "free".


Proper multi-user support is mostly a kernel - and filesystem - thing, the layers on top of that are merely an extension of kernel and filesystem functionality.

Reply Score: 5

RE[5]: KISS
by phoenix on Sun 5th Aug 2012 19:41 UTC in reply to "RE[4]: KISS"
phoenix Member since:
2005-07-11

Android already support file permissions, file ownership, and multiple user accounts and groups. Just drop to a shell and look at the output of 'ls -l'. Just about every app on Android runs under its own UID.

However, that's all below the GUI. Above the GUI, there's only 1 real user account, one 'home' directory, one set of settings, etc.

All it's really missing is the GUI layer, and splitting the 'home' directory into properly segregated directories with the appropriate permissions in place.

There are several add-on packages that do this, mostly from companies looking to add 'work' and 'play' profiles to a device. Now, Google is just incorporating similar features into the OS.

Reply Score: 4

RE[3]: KISS
by WereCatf on Sat 4th Aug 2012 21:09 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: KISS"
WereCatf Member since:
2006-02-15

I think that adding multi-user support to a mobile OS is not a priority at all.

Android developers should focus on performance. iOS is way ahead in this particular matter, It feels faster even using slower hardware.


You mentioned having tried Transformer Pad but I got the image that it's been a while ago. If true then that Pad was most likely still running Honeycomb; ICS 4.0 saw quite a large boost to graphics performance and fluidity, and the new Jelly Bean 4.1 improved that even more. Have you, or have you not tried an Android-tablet with similar specs as that iPad running Android 4.0.1 or newer? If not then that is most likely the reason for your experience.

Also, Android developers are improving Android's performance. You're just assuming that the developers can only work on one thing at a time which, quite obviously, isn't true. In fact it's often detrimental to development efforts to have a really large team all trying to work on the same thing, that's exactly why e.g. F/OSS developers tend to dedicate certain parts of the software to certain developers instead of all concentrating on only one thing at a time. Ie. you're complaining about something that is already being worked on and you're complaining about it as if one cannot work on other things, too, at the same time.

Reply Score: 3

Comment by MOS6510
by MOS6510 on Sat 4th Aug 2012 13:19 UTC
MOS6510
Member since:
2011-05-12

I too got confused about the title and intro. Amiga, multi user, a link to something about Windows 8, multi tasking, Android!? I wasn't planning on clicking the links, but I was totally confused about the Amiga and multi user support.

But now the chaos has settled I just like to mention I'd like some kind of multi user for the iPad (not a phone). I guess most tablets get shared amongst family members. Right now my son ruins my game progresses, because he plays MY games.

Reply Score: 3

RE: Comment by MOS6510
by WereCatf on Sat 4th Aug 2012 13:26 UTC in reply to "Comment by MOS6510"
WereCatf Member since:
2006-02-15
RE[2]: Comment by MOS6510
by MOS6510 on Sat 4th Aug 2012 13:29 UTC in reply to "RE: Comment by MOS6510"
MOS6510 Member since:
2011-05-12

If they've been working on it since 2010 I'm not holding my breath. :-(

Reply Score: 2

RE[3]: Comment by MOS6510
by WereCatf on Sat 4th Aug 2012 13:59 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Comment by MOS6510"
WereCatf Member since:
2006-02-15

Well, apparently Google has been working on multi-user support on Android since 2011, so it's only a year apart. Besides, if Android gets multi-user Apple will feel the push to do the same for iOS; I have no doubt there will be multi-user for you eventually.

Reply Score: 2

How are you?
by kovacm on Sat 4th Aug 2012 13:49 UTC
kovacm
Member since:
2010-12-16

I just wonder how old are you Thom?
What was yours first computer? What was your "computer path"? Did you ever had Amiga?...

Beside, title and intro are confusing.

And regarding multiuser suport for tablets - "face login" ability would be perfect for this! It would be fast and simple way for multiuser funcionality on tablets.

Reply Score: 1

RE: How are you?
by MOS6510 on Sat 4th Aug 2012 18:37 UTC in reply to "How are you?"
MOS6510 Member since:
2011-05-12

What about a finger print reader on the home button?

Well, call me old fashioned but I'm actually not very fond of these face 'n' finger identifiers. Give me a login and password and I can log in with a mask on and no fingers. Ehm, well with at least one finger of course.

Reply Score: 3

RE[2]: How are you?
by Morgan on Sun 5th Aug 2012 19:10 UTC in reply to "RE: How are you?"
Morgan Member since:
2005-06-29

No fingers necessary, just use your tongue (though not when your significant other is in the room. This is not anecdotal. Really. I mean it!)

;)

Reply Score: 2

RE[3]: How are you?
by MOS6510 on Sun 5th Aug 2012 19:16 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: How are you?"
MOS6510 Member since:
2011-05-12

I once broke my arm during a basketball game. The temporary bandage allowed me to bend my wrist a little and type. But then the real bandage was put on and I couldn't type with my right hand. I tried with my nose, but that didn't work.

Maybe I'll try your tongue technique next time. Agree with the wife thing.

Reply Score: 2

RE[3]: How are you?
by zima on Tue 7th Aug 2012 07:49 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: How are you?"
zima Member since:
2005-07-06

No fingers necessary, just use your tongue

Though, on capacitive screens, not when there's some saliva on it. I suppose you have to stick it out some time before use and, uhm, wait it to dry out a bit...

Reply Score: 2

RE[2]: How are you?
by kovacm on Mon 6th Aug 2012 07:07 UTC in reply to "RE: How are you?"
kovacm Member since:
2010-12-16

What about a finger print reader on the home button?


I have some Compaq iPaq with finger print reader ;)

Well, call me old fashioned but I'm actually not very fond of these face 'n' finger identifiers. Give me a login and password and I can log in with a mask on and no fingers. Ehm, well with at least one finger of course.

:D ... yea... maybe not best idea. but still - selecting user and typing password seems to complicated for tablets... maybe selecting user and drawing pass like on Androids is winning combination ;)

Reply Score: 1

RE[3]: How are you?
by MOS6510 on Mon 6th Aug 2012 07:25 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: How are you?"
MOS6510 Member since:
2011-05-12

It's a bit easy to look over a shoulder and see the "code", but it is a very convenient way to unlock.

Reply Score: 2

RE[4]: How are you?
by kovacm on Tue 7th Aug 2012 08:05 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: How are you?"
kovacm Member since:
2010-12-16

It's a bit easy to look over a shoulder and see the "code", but it is a very convenient way to unlock.


"Nuance's Nina to enable iOS apps to authenticate users by the sound of their voice"

"my voice is my passport" ;) ;)

Reply Score: 1

RE[5]: How are you?
by MOS6510 on Tue 7th Aug 2012 08:07 UTC in reply to "RE[4]: How are you?"
MOS6510 Member since:
2011-05-12

Didn't you see 2001? Learn from mistakes made in the past!

Reply Score: 3

Tablets aren't ready for multi-user yet
by laffer1 on Sat 4th Aug 2012 14:13 UTC
laffer1
Member since:
2007-11-09

I was very upset when the iPad shipped without multiuser support. As expensive as most good tablets are, it only made sense to share one with my wife. However, after using a kindle fire and her iPad for some time, I think it's crazy to add multiuser support to a tablet right now.

Storage:

The problem with tablets is the storage space. Sure, in the future where the cloud takes over it won't matter. Right now it does. In fact, Amazon's latest downgrade of their cloud player and cloud drive system make my kindle fire less useful because there is less cloud storage available for my content. I can pony up the $25, but it seems silly when I'm mostly in Apple's ecosystem anyway. Not to mention the average new user would still be mad to lose something they already had. I want my tablet to have 128GB of storage or more. For a family of four, that means 32GB per user which is the current standard I think. That or actually make good cloud services. I still prefer to have my stuff on my devices though.

Quotas:

The next problem with tablets is they need more than just logins, they also need disk quotas. Who wants their kid to fill up their tablet?

Resistance:

Device manufacturers want people to buy four tablets, not give everyone a login. They make more money that way.

Damage:

My boss shared his tablet with his kid and the little guy broke it. Him and a friend decided to sit on it. Now it won't charge. That's another problem with multiuser. It's safer to buy kids a cheaper, more durable tablet that can be easily replaced. You don't hand them an iPad or the latest samsung android device.

Sharing content:

if you don't have kids, sharing a tablet could work. I can easily see sharing my wife's iPad with her. I have loaned her my kindle fire so she can read some books I bought. The key here is that we want to share content with each other. There has to be a way to do that and most DRM schemes are against family members sharing content. My wife has to know my apple password so she can stream my iTunes content on her Mac or if the apple tv gets screwed up again. I can't permit her access to my music and videos.

Reply Score: 2

WereCatf Member since:
2006-02-15

I want my tablet to have 128GB of storage or more. For a family of four, that means 32GB per user which is the current standard I think.


Atleast here in Finland most people seem content with 16GB storage, so 64GB would suffice for four people in most cases here. Well, 64GB is actually perfectly reachable, just buy a tablet with microSDHC-slot and you can add quite a lot of space there. These days most of these microSDHC-devices actually support microSDXC-cards up to 128GB even though they don't advertise this anywhere -- even my old Tegra2 - based Iconia Tab A500 supports those.

The next problem with tablets is they need more than just logins, they also need disk quotas.


This I agree with, but, well, there is no technical reason for why quotas couldn't be implemented. Linux-kernel has had support for quotas for a decade so all Google needs to do is add an utility for settings the limits and a warning in the status bar when you're about to exceed your quota.

I'd hazard a guess that it's not much more difficult on iOS, either.

Device manufacturers want people to buy four tablets, not give everyone a login. They make more money that way.


Good thing, then, that device manufacturers have no say over this.

That's another problem with multiuser. It's safer to buy kids a cheaper, more durable tablet that can be easily replaced. You don't hand them an iPad or the latest samsung android device.


If your children are still very young, yes, but if you're children are closer to 14 then such stuff is unlikely to happen. Atleast if you've raised your children properly.

There has to be a way to do that and most DRM schemes are against family members sharing content. My wife has to know my apple password so she can stream my iTunes content on her Mac or if the apple tv gets screwed up again. I can't permit her access to my music and videos.


That problem doesn't really have anything to do with the OS as it's all about the content creators themselves, you should complain to them or move to another service.

Reply Score: 4

nefer Member since:
2012-02-15

Its not a good idea to store a lot of content on a tablet anyway. It takes ages to sync, and when the device is lost or hosed, the data is gone too.

Next to cloud there are also local storage alternatives which offer storage capabilities way beyond the internal storage. Modern NAS appliances offer native ways on Post-PC devices for working on centralized storage directly.

Reply Score: 2

multitasking
by gfx1 on Sun 5th Aug 2012 06:49 UTC
gfx1
Member since:
2006-01-20

The Amiga and Beos are multitasking operating systems.
Not multiuser, you have only one account.
Same as android 4 ics. It can run multiple programs at the same time but you cannot logout so other users can still read your e-mail etc.

Reply Score: 1

For the love of...
by darcysmith on Mon 6th Aug 2012 02:29 UTC
darcysmith
Member since:
2006-04-12

Good grief Thom. Here is how I (and probably many others) read the article (and most articles):

1) read the summary before clicking on the links.
2) click on the links (I didn't do this this time, I headed to the comments).
3) read the comments.

I didn't do #2 this time because the article was screwed up. Without clicking on the links you are saying that Amiga had multi-user support in 1985.

The summary should at least summarize the intent of the title, which it doesn't. The reason for that is that you are trying to be sarcastic/belittle things rather than write a coherent article, or at least that is how it comes across.

I am no writer but...

"This tweet about mutli-tasking from Tom Warren made me smile. So, it's 2012 and tablets are finally able to do what the Amiga did in 1985. Seems like a bit of a stretch to be excited about that, right? Sure, until I caught myself getting excited - only a bit, but still - by this piece of news about mutli-user support. Update: removed me being an annoyed child."

Just had to add 3 words and the summary is clear.

Reply Score: 4

Hopefully more than a homescreen
by FunkyELF on Mon 6th Aug 2012 19:01 UTC
FunkyELF
Member since:
2006-07-26

The video talked about hiding Google+ and messaging.

I understand that you'd want to hide SMS messaging on a phone... because you only have 1 phone number, but shouldn't things like Google+, Facebook, Twitter, Pandora accounts all be separate?

Hopefully they're working on this and will be fully supported in Key Lime Pie (if that is what they call it).

Also, are we sure that this is from AOSP Jelly Bean and not something Cyanogenmod added in?

Reply Score: 2

Fundamental restriction.
by dsmogor on Tue 7th Aug 2012 09:59 UTC
dsmogor
Member since:
2005-09-01

There's no real multi-user experience without live session switching. And that requires swap memory which is no go on a flash devices. Android alleviates this by app live cycle but that one requires that every app implements this correctly.
So phones and tablets will never reach the level of multi-user prowess that workstations enjoy.

Reply Score: 2

RE: Fundamental restriction.
by zima on Thu 9th Aug 2012 23:19 UTC in reply to "Fundamental restriction."
zima Member since:
2005-07-06

At worst, you can just throw tons of ram at any such problems (something which mobile phones already do; they are basically more powerful than workstations from a decade ago - and I'm sure many people would say, back then, mobiles "will never reach" that; and in contemporary workstations, one might as well turn off swap with the present amounts of RAM ...it's there very just in case)

Reply Score: 2

kajaman
Member since:
2006-01-06

"The Android platform takes advantage of the Linux user-based protection as a means of identifying and isolating application resources. The Android system assigns a unique user ID (UID) to each Android application and runs it as that user in a separate process. This approach is different from other operating systems (including the traditional Linux configuration), where multiple applications run with the same user permissions." (http://source.android.com/tech/security/)

So the Android architects decided to exploit Linux's multi-user support to enhance security in the system itself. I can't say I like the approach, but that's the way it is. It *will* be pretty hard to put multiuser support on top of that, I would say.

As for iOS, I'm not an expert, but paper published by Apple (http://images.apple.com/ipad/business/docs/iOS_Security_May12.pdf) suggests that UID and GID are unique for each device. I cannot say if they map to Unix/Darwin UID/GIDs, maybe someone can advise here.

Edited 2012-08-07 19:14 UTC

Reply Score: 1