Linked by Thom Holwerda on Sat 25th Aug 2012 19:40 UTC
In the News "Neil Armstrong, the first man to walk on the moon, died Saturday, weeks after heart surgery and days after his 82nd birthday on Aug. 5. Armstrong commanded the Apollo 11 spacecraft that landed on the moon on July 20, 1969, and he radioed back to Earth the historic news of 'one giant leap for mankind'. He spent nearly three hours walking on the moon with fellow astronaut Edwin 'Buzz' Aldrin." Our thoughts are with his family and friends. Such a great man. The world lost a true legendary hero today. This man will be an inspiration for generations to come.
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Comment by MOS6510
by MOS6510 on Sat 25th Aug 2012 19:42 UTC
MOS6510
Member since:
2011-05-12

A great man has left us.

Reply Score: 7

RE: Comment by MOS6510
by Thom_Holwerda on Sat 25th Aug 2012 19:49 UTC in reply to "Comment by MOS6510"
Thom_Holwerda Member since:
2005-06-29

Puts our stupid bickering over stuff that doesn't matter in perspective, don't it? ;)

Reply Score: 5

RE[2]: Comment by MOS6510
by MOS6510 on Sat 25th Aug 2012 20:01 UTC in reply to "RE: Comment by MOS6510"
MOS6510 Member since:
2011-05-12

We just went to the movies and while I was standing in the parking lot I noticed the moon only to find out moments later Neil Armstrong passed away.

I think that looking at the stars or looking at pictures of the Earth is a great way of putting things in to perspective.

Chances are we are the only intelligent live in this part of the galaxy and instead of being happy and doing science stuff to reach out to the stars and the mysteries of live, the universe and everything we make up all these things that make us unhappy. Money, borders, patents, rules, religion.

Just think about it how insane money is. Money doesn't exist, we made it up and then we spend our lives acquiring it, killing others for it, saying we can't help others because we don't have enough money or don't want to spend it.

One day a killer astroid will come at us and we can't stop it, because we don't have enough money.

If aliens visit us one day, no matter how smart they are they'll never figure out what we are doing here and why.

Neil was lucky, for a brief moment he escaped the madness and walked on the f*cking moon! It's hard to top that.

"It is an important and popular fact that things are not always what they seem. For instance, on the planet Earth, man had always assumed that he was more intelligent than dolphins because he had achieved so much -- the wheel, New York, wars and so on -- whilst all the dolphins had ever done was muck about in the water having a good time. But conversely, the dolphins had always believed that they were far more intelligent than man -- for precisely the same reasons." -- Douglas Noel Adams

Reply Score: 15

RE[3]: Comment by MOS6510
by joekiser on Sun 26th Aug 2012 13:48 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Comment by MOS6510"
joekiser Member since:
2005-06-30


Just think about it how insane money is. Money doesn't exist, we made it up and then we spend our lives acquiring it,


Money is a measurement of scarcity of resources, and a way to reward effort. Its no small coincidence that the nation with the most money (the nation that was born on the idea that wealth is created, not a zero-sum game) is also the only nation that has put a man on the moon.

killing others for it


The first man on the moon rose to his position by dropping bombs on Koreans as a 20 year old pilot. I'm not saying this detracts from his later accomplishments at all, only that the world isn't as cut-dry black and white, good and bad as you make it.

Reply Score: 5

RE[4]: Comment by MOS6510
by MOS6510 on Sun 26th Aug 2012 14:38 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: Comment by MOS6510"
MOS6510 Member since:
2011-05-12

Apple has money, the US has an enormous debt and Neil Armstrong didn't go bombing Koreans because he figured it was a quick and safe way to earn a buck.

Money doesn't exist. To make trade easier we made stuff we called money and agreed it has a certain worth, just like we agreed how chess pieces move.

In nature and the universe there is no money. No anthill or beehive ever went bust. No birds ever stopped migrating, because they couldn't effort the trip. No lost tourist was ever able to bribe a lion with money. No dolphin ever stopped having a fun time, because he was too busy finding a job to pay his bills. No alpha ape ever went around collecting taxes. No alien species would ever accept our money in exchange for their technology, because money is worthless unless you and others agree it has a value.

Earth and the universe did fine for billions of years without any money.

Reply Score: 2

RE[5]: Comment by MOS6510
by Alfman on Sun 26th Aug 2012 15:04 UTC in reply to "RE[4]: Comment by MOS6510"
Alfman Member since:
2011-01-28

I'm going to smack the next person who mentions "Apple" in this article.

Reply Score: 3

RE[6]: Comment by MOS6510
by MOS6510 on Sun 26th Aug 2012 15:05 UTC in reply to "RE[5]: Comment by MOS6510"
MOS6510 Member since:
2011-05-12

As long as you don't smack an alien. We don't want an article about Neil Armstrong to be the cause of an intergalactic war.

Reply Score: 2

RE[5]: Comment by MOS6510
by danbuter on Sun 26th Aug 2012 23:01 UTC in reply to "RE[4]: Comment by MOS6510"
danbuter Member since:
2011-03-17

Reminds me of Death in Pratchett's "Hogfather". Grind down the entire universe and you won't find a single molecule of mercy or justice.

Reply Score: 2

RE[5]: Comment by MOS6510
by joekiser on Sun 26th Aug 2012 23:59 UTC in reply to "RE[4]: Comment by MOS6510"
joekiser Member since:
2005-06-30

In nature and the universe there is no money. No anthill or beehive ever went bust. No birds ever stopped migrating, because they couldn't effort the trip. No lost tourist was ever able to bribe a lion with money. No dolphin ever stopped having a fun time, because he was too busy finding a job to pay his bills. No alpha ape ever went around collecting taxes. No alien species would ever accept our money in exchange for their technology, because money is worthless unless you and others agree it has a value.


If alien visitors ever visit Earth, they might not care about money, but they will be far more interested in the species that has sent men to the moon, vehicle-sized craft to Mars, and probes beyond the solar system than they would be in animals that live day-to-day trying not to get eaten.

Edited 2012-08-27 00:00 UTC

Reply Score: 2

RE[6]: Comment by MOS6510
by winter skies on Mon 27th Aug 2012 11:13 UTC in reply to "RE[5]: Comment by MOS6510"
winter skies Member since:
2009-08-21

If alien visitors ever visit Earth, they might not care about money, but they will be far more interested in the species that has sent men to the moon, vehicle-sized craft to Mars, and probes beyond the solar system than they would be in animals that live day-to-day trying not to get eaten.


Of course. But probably that would be true just because there's some other even more intelligent alien species who has never bothered to build a spaceship to discover our Earth and instead refined the art of spending a blissful existence playing in the seas, skies or on the surface of their unpolluted planet. ;)
It might sound pessimistic, but I'm still convinced that happiness and knowledge are two separate paths and you can not pursue one unless you abandon the other. Obviously there's infinitely more complexity to this matter than that, but it's a realistic rule of thumb.

Reply Score: 2

RE[5]: Comment by MOS6510
by kwan_e on Mon 27th Aug 2012 02:07 UTC in reply to "RE[4]: Comment by MOS6510"
kwan_e Member since:
2007-02-18

In nature and the universe there is no money.


There still are costs. In fact, lots of animals pay with sex or food or building materials.

No anthill or beehive ever went bust.


Anthills and beehives go bust all the time. Of course, it now turns out that Colony Collapse Disorder is caused by Bayer's insecticide, but entymologists would tell you that a great number of beehives die out every year normally.

No birds ever stopped migrating, because they couldn't effort the trip.


Except that's precisely how flightless birds came about.

No lost tourist was ever able to bribe a lion with money.


If the lost tourist had the right amount of money in the right currency then they would be able to bribe the lion.

No dolphin ever stopped having a fun time, because he was too busy finding a job to pay his bills.


Actually, the only dolphins that have a "fun time" are those you see at those water parks (whatever name it is). How do you know they are having "fun"? They're having "fun" to get the continued supply of fish. Out in the wild, it's a constant battle against starvation and murder.

No alpha ape ever went around collecting taxes.


Humans are apes.

No alien species would ever accept our money in exchange for their technology, because money is worthless unless you and others agree it has a value.


Which goes back to the question about the currency in use.

Earth and the universe did fine for billions of years without any money.


And yet, money emerged. The earth and the universe obviously had a need for money.

Reply Score: 4

RE[6]: Comment by MOS6510
by Doc Pain on Mon 27th Aug 2012 03:16 UTC in reply to "RE[5]: Comment by MOS6510"
Doc Pain Member since:
2006-10-08

"Earth and the universe did fine for billions of years without any money.


And yet, money emerged. The earth and the universe obviously had a need for money.
"

No. Just several people had a need for money. One may speculate that some amount of them could be categorized as parasites, as today there's a significant share of people benefiting from the existence of money without creating any value or contributing to mankind, draining energy from the whole system.

Reply Score: 2

RE[7]: Comment by MOS6510
by kwan_e on Mon 27th Aug 2012 03:47 UTC in reply to "RE[6]: Comment by MOS6510"
kwan_e Member since:
2007-02-18

"[q]Earth and the universe did fine for billions of years without any money.


And yet, money emerged. The earth and the universe obviously had a need for money.
"

No. Just several people had a need for money. [/q]

Are people not part of the Earth and the universe?

* Hint: just because the universe has no need for money doesn't mean it shouldn't exist. The universe has no need for life either. You can't argue about the need for properties which are emergent.

** This is not to say that money is perfect. I would say money needs to be subject to conservation laws like the rest of physical and biological laws. None of this "Company A is really worth $600 billion because the total of its shares at the current share price is worth $600 billion" nonsense.

Reply Score: 4

RE[3]: Comment by MOS6510
by Soulbender on Mon 27th Aug 2012 10:29 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Comment by MOS6510"
Soulbender Member since:
2005-08-18

I'm with the dolphins.

Reply Score: 2

RE: Comment by MOS6510
by tanzam75 on Sat 25th Aug 2012 22:42 UTC in reply to "Comment by MOS6510"
tanzam75 Member since:
2011-05-19

Hear hear.

The guy had nerves of steel.

He saved the Gemini 8 mission after a thruster stuck open, rolling the spacecraft so rapidly that the astronauts' vision became blurry.

He ejected from an out-of-control LLRV that could've killed him.

And he guided the Eagle to its lunar landing, with just 25 seconds of fuel to spare. Not only that, but the computer overloaded twice and then directed the LM at a boulder field that could've destroyed it. And to top it all off, a premature fuel warning that made him think he had even less fuel than the little he had.

Reply Score: 6

RE[2]: Comment by MOS6510
by lala on Sun 26th Aug 2012 01:13 UTC in reply to "RE: Comment by MOS6510"
lala Member since:
2006-01-15

Unbelievable story..examples right stuff.

Reply Score: 1

RE[2]: Comment by MOS6510
by zima on Sat 1st Sep 2012 23:55 UTC in reply to "RE: Comment by MOS6510"
zima Member since:
2005-07-06

The guy had nerves of steel.
[...]
He ejected from an out-of-control LLRV that could've killed him.

I'm not sure if ejecting out of soon-to-crash vehicle is a fitting example to "nerves of steel"... what does that make the people on passenger aircraft, who have no means to eject, not even a parachute? (especially those in the 20s or, partly, 30s - when airlines had safety record fairly comparable to space missions)

Reply Score: 2

RE: Comment by MOS6510
by Laurence on Sun 26th Aug 2012 10:14 UTC in reply to "Comment by MOS6510"
Laurence Member since:
2007-03-26

Very true.

I know Dr Who is only make believe, but I'm reminded of a scene where the Doctor refers to the moon landings as the most watch piece of video footage ever; and I quite believe that to be the case. Regardless of age, gender, race or even personal interests: nearly every single person on the globe will have at some point seen Armstrong's iconic first steps. And with good reason too!

I don't know if I'll ever live to see anything as pioneering nor extraordinary as Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin's lunar antics, but if -as a planet- we do take up manned space flight again, Armstrong will definitely an inspiration to everyone involved.

RIP

Reply Score: 2

RE[2]: Comment by MOS6510
by wanker90210 on Sun 26th Aug 2012 14:13 UTC in reply to "RE: Comment by MOS6510"
wanker90210 Member since:
2007-10-26

And, possibly because of images of the Silence disrupting, humanity believes the first words on the moon was "a small step..." when they really were "I'm down the ladder now"

Reply Score: 3

The Right Stuff
by Cyberbear on Sat 25th Aug 2012 23:43 UTC
Cyberbear
Member since:
2005-06-29

He really did have the Right Stuff.

Godspeed Neil!

Reply Score: 1

Bright star
by acobar on Sun 26th Aug 2012 01:46 UTC
acobar
Member since:
2005-11-15

Look up to the sky this night. We all will see a new bright star shining with an unsual steady light that was not there yesterday.

We have one less hero walking on earth. Rest in peace great man.

This is an unfortunate day for man, one giant miss for mankind.

Reply Score: 2

RE: Bright star
by kwan_e on Sun 26th Aug 2012 02:20 UTC in reply to "Bright star"
kwan_e Member since:
2007-02-18

Look up to the sky this night. We all will see a new bright star shining with an unsual steady light that was not there yesterday.


That's not how stars work.

Or rather, it statistically happens all the time.

Reply Score: 4

"I walked on the moon"
by kwan_e on Sun 26th Aug 2012 02:21 UTC
kwan_e
Member since:
2007-02-18
What's all the fuss about
by bowkota on Sun 26th Aug 2012 07:14 UTC
bowkota
Member since:
2011-10-12

Sad to see him go. Important historic figure yes but that's where I draw the line. The praising in the media is just ridiculous. This man was nothing special. He wasn't a hero and he was no greater than any of his numerous other colleagues waiting to take that seat.

The true heroes and great men are the scientists and engineers working their ass off to get him (up) there; the ones who didn't receive any sort of praise or credit.

Edited 2012-08-26 07:15 UTC

Reply Score: 1

RE: What's all the fuss about
by kwan_e on Sun 26th Aug 2012 07:40 UTC in reply to "What's all the fuss about"
kwan_e Member since:
2007-02-18

He wasn't a hero


What's your definition of hero?

and he was no greater than any of his numerous other colleagues waiting to take that seat.


Here's a lesson in simple logic for you:

The statement "Neil Armstrong is a hero" does not imply "Therefore he was greater than his colleagues".

Your complaint is thus idiotic.

The true heroes and great men are the scientists and engineers working their ass off to get him (up) there; the ones who didn't receive any sort of praise or credit.


They receive praise and credit ALL THE TIME. Neill is receiving praise and credit today especially is because HE DIED. When those scientists and engineers die, they too will get the praise and credit on that day.

Recognizing someone on a special occasion does not result in a shortage of supply for the next praiseworthy person or act.

There's an art to cynicism. You do not have it.

Reply Score: 3

RE[2]: What's all the fuss about
by bowkota on Sun 26th Aug 2012 08:10 UTC in reply to "RE: What's all the fuss about"
bowkota Member since:
2011-10-12


They receive praise and credit ALL THE TIME. Neill is receiving praise and credit today especially is because HE DIED. When those scientists and engineers die, they too will get the praise and credit on that day.

Errr, I'm pretty sure many of the NASA engineers responsible for that mission have passed away since then. You are aware that such a project is supported by hundreds of engineers. I'm pretty sure that there haven't been any headlines for them.

I understand the publicity; people want to celebrate this man's life because for some reason he was important to them. However I object to the over-exaggeration of his accomplishments and all the hero statements being thrown around.

Reply Score: 3

RE[2]: What's all the fuss about
by Alfman on Sun 26th Aug 2012 15:01 UTC in reply to "RE: What's all the fuss about"
Alfman Member since:
2011-01-28

kwan_e,

I agree with the OP that we tend to over-credit the individual and under-credit the team, many of whom will never get public recognition for their efforts.

Not to be disrespectful to Armstrong, his moon landing is a testament to human achievement and he deserves credit for being the first, but he would probably admit that he was a *very* lucky guy to have landed that role, it might have easily gone to someone else.

Reply Score: 3

RE[3]: What's all the fuss about
by MOS6510 on Sun 26th Aug 2012 15:34 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: What's all the fuss about"
MOS6510 Member since:
2011-05-12

Well, he did mention something about a small step for one man and a giant leap for mankind as he got of his ride.

Reply Score: 2

RE[3]: What's all the fuss about
by kwan_e on Mon 27th Aug 2012 01:50 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: What's all the fuss about"
kwan_e Member since:
2007-02-18

but he would probably admit that he was a *very* lucky guy to have landed that role, it might have easily gone to someone else.


He would admit it. But it doesn't change the fact that no one would choose a less qualified pilot to do the first lunar landing. It wasn't through luck that he was one of the best test pilots available for the job.

Reply Score: 1

RE[4]: What's all the fuss about
by Alfman on Mon 27th Aug 2012 14:34 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: What's all the fuss about"
Alfman Member since:
2011-01-28

"He would admit it. But it doesn't change the fact that no one would choose a less qualified pilot to do the first lunar landing. It wasn't through luck that he was one of the best test pilots available for the job."


Armstrong was a great inspiration to us because of what he did, there's no denying that. He was certainly qualified, however none of the other qualified people who could have gone will get much recognition in the end simply because they were not lucky enough to go on that first moon mission.

Quoting astronaut Walt Cunningham:
"Most of our group in those days could have accomplished the challenge of the mission, but I do not know a one that could have handled the resulting notoriety as well as Neil did."

Reply Score: 3

RE[5]: What's all the fuss about
by Alfman on Mon 27th Aug 2012 18:46 UTC in reply to "RE[4]: What's all the fuss about"
Alfman Member since:
2011-01-28

I hope I don't offend anybody by the way I said that. I don't want to lessen the public admiration of Armstrong, but I do want to increase the admiration of all the early anonymous engineers and space pioneers. It shows that humanity can achieve great feats when we decide to work together towards a common goal.

Our technology has advanced by magnitudes, but somehow I feel like humanity has regressed since those times. Maybe we need another "space race" of sorts to kickstart the next human milestone in which we can all take pride in again.

Reply Score: 3

RE: What's all the fuss about
by Sodki on Sun 26th Aug 2012 07:56 UTC in reply to "What's all the fuss about"
Sodki Member since:
2005-11-10

He wasn't a hero and he was no greater than any of his numerous other colleagues waiting to take that seat.

The true heroes and great men are the scientists and engineers working their ass off to get him (up) there; the ones who didn't receive any sort of praise or credit.


Regarding the space pioneers, everyone is a hero, from the scientists and engineers to the navigators and astronauts. Everyone was important and everyone had to do their job, otherwise the mission would have failed and the astronauts would have been killed.

A previous comment by tanzam75 showed just that: the scientists and engineers could not have done Neil's job (and vice-versa). Neil's colleagues are also heroes. This is not a zero sum game.

Reply Score: 4

RE[2]: What's all the fuss about
by marcus0263 on Tue 28th Aug 2012 01:46 UTC in reply to "RE: What's all the fuss about"
marcus0263 Member since:
2007-06-02

"He wasn't a hero and he was no greater than any of his numerous other colleagues waiting to take that seat.

The true heroes and great men are the scientists and engineers working their ass off to get him (up) there; the ones who didn't receive any sort of prraise or credit.


Regarding the space pioneers, everyone is a hero, from the scientists and engineers to the navigators and astronauts. Everyone was important and everyone had to do their job, otherwise the mission would have failed and the astronauts would have been killed.

A previous comment by tanzam75 showed just that: the scientists and engineers could not have done Neil's job (and vice-versa). Neil's colleagues are also heroes. This is not a zero sum game.
"

But only a few had the Balls to crawl into a soup can and be hureled millions of miles hoping to hit a small speck of dirt. But then again he was a Marine pilot, he had a lot of practice landing on a pitching/ rolling speck of asphalt in pitch black night.

Semper Fi my Brother Neil, the world lost a great one

Edited 2012-08-28 01:51 UTC

Reply Score: 1

RE: What's all the fuss about
by MOS6510 on Sun 26th Aug 2012 09:28 UTC in reply to "What's all the fuss about"
MOS6510 Member since:
2011-05-12

Not sure I would like to be shot in to space using 1960's technology, walk around on the moon and then fly back.

There are thousands of scientists for every astronaut, but many more astronauts died in accidents than scientists did.

When a scientist makes an error he or she doesn't die, someone else does.

Reply Score: 2

RE[2]: What's all the fuss about
by kwan_e on Sun 26th Aug 2012 11:00 UTC in reply to "RE: What's all the fuss about"
kwan_e Member since:
2007-02-18

When a scientist makes an error he or she doesn't die, someone else does.


After the first few successful launches, the only errors that caused deaths were those of management. Records show that the scientists and engineers clearly warn of technical problems which management is recorded to have ignored, leading to deaths.

Whatever one thinks of the state of US science, it is undeniable that NASA still has the best in the business and they are rarely wrong.

Reply Score: 0

RE[2]: What's all the fuss about
by zima on Sat 1st Sep 2012 23:58 UTC in reply to "RE: What's all the fuss about"
zima Member since:
2005-07-06

There are thousands of scientists for every astronaut, but many more astronauts died in accidents than scientists did.
When a scientist makes an error he or she doesn't die, someone else does.

For the usual meaning of "rocket scientist" (~="a specialist that works with rockets) that is simply incorrect, disasters on launchpads alone killed many more scientists/technicians than astronauts ...in fact, just _one_ of them did that
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_spaceflight-related_accidents_...

Meanwhile, it was a bit of a farce that, out of the twelve people who walked on the Moon, only one was a geologist, during the last Apollo moon mission - and only because he was bumped up at the last moment, after pleads from the scientific community, from a mission which never flew.
Frankly, I'm a bit surprised & disappointed that the scientific community wasn't more firm in their expectations - something to the tune of "we won't work on Apollo unless there will be a pro scientist on every two-man landing crew, and a scientist will be also the one who steps down first"

Edited 2012-09-02 00:16 UTC

Reply Score: 2

RE: What's all the fuss about
by BluenoseJake on Mon 27th Aug 2012 17:47 UTC in reply to "What's all the fuss about"
BluenoseJake Member since:
2005-08-11

The man sat on a tube filled with explosives and traveled farther than any other man had ever traveled before that, in one of the most hostile environments known.

How is that not special? Can you do it? Have you done it? No? Then STFU.

Edited 2012-08-27 17:47 UTC

Reply Score: 1

Comment by zima
by zima on Sat 1st Sep 2012 23:59 UTC in reply to "RE: What's all the fuss about"
zima Member since:
2005-07-06

Apollo 9 and 10 missions were just as far... (and, earlier to that, turtles on Zond 5 ;p )

And no, I can't do that - for one, I was born at the wrong time, in a wrong place (just one man from my country was ever in space, and that was mostly just Intercosmos political PR).
Also, I was essentially outright blocked from such feats: for one, I have one generally hardly significant medical condition (caused by other people, by one medical frak up when I was 1 year old), but which disqualifies me from ever being a pilot of even a glider - meanwhile, I more than passed the educational requirements needed to get to a school that educates fighter pilots in my country; also, I was first in the final of "physics olympics" ...it didn't matter, and I suppose you'd just told me to "STFU"

Generally, people overestimate the individual contribution to the "end effect", and how our life ends up - it's one of the cognitive biases. Now, I'm not seeing the chosen twelve were poorly qualified, they weren't - but you could easily find at least hundreds which were just as well. Plus, curiously how all of the twelve were white males, most of them with angular jawbones...
Or ponder that: out of the twelve, only one was a professional geologist, during the very last Apollo moon mission - and only because he was bumped up at the last moment, after pleads from the scientific community, from a mission which never flew.

Kerosene, liquid oxygen, liquid hydrogen are not very strictly speaking explosives, BTW ...unless you're also marvelled at the fact that I use explosives in my kitchen, SEVERAL TIMES PER DAY?
(and either way, disasters on launchpads alone killed many more scientists/technicians than astronauts... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_spaceflight-related_accidents_... )

Edited 2012-09-02 00:18 UTC

Reply Score: 2

RE: What's all the fuss about
by Soulbender on Tue 28th Aug 2012 11:25 UTC in reply to "What's all the fuss about"
Soulbender Member since:
2005-08-18

This man was nothing special.


Except that he was part of a team that flew into space and to the moon in the 60's in a tube filled with highly explosive rocket fuel and with less computing power than your phone.
No offence to the scientists and engineers but their life wasn't on the line.

Reply Score: 1

v Comment by marcp
by marcp on Sun 26th Aug 2012 10:17 UTC
RE: Comment by marcp
by kwan_e on Sun 26th Aug 2012 11:10 UTC in reply to "Comment by marcp"
kwan_e Member since:
2007-02-18

To possible non-believers who tend to claim that there were no man on the moon ...

No matter what is the truth, mr Armstrong was a great astronaut or a great actor. Either way he was a great man ;)


Buzz Aldrin will punch you in the face. ;)

Reply Score: 3

RE[2]: Comment by marcp
by marcp on Sun 26th Aug 2012 18:06 UTC in reply to "RE: Comment by marcp"
marcp Member since:
2007-11-23

As usual, people don't get the joke and probobly think that I have something against this great man.

Humanity ... d'oh!

Yeah, right, mod the f$@! down. You have an obvious reason to do so, you bunch of insensitive clots!

PS in case anyone's wondering: yes, that is also a joke. Bye.

Reply Score: 0

RE[2]: Comment by marcp
by lucas_maximus on Mon 27th Aug 2012 10:04 UTC in reply to "RE: Comment by marcp"
lucas_maximus Member since:
2009-08-18

I loved watching that.

Reply Score: 2

Great Actor
by tuma324 on Sun 26th Aug 2012 14:33 UTC
tuma324
Member since:
2010-04-09

RIP.

Reply Score: 2

Letter from Neil Armstrong
by Vai777 on Sun 26th Aug 2012 17:55 UTC
Vai777
Member since:
2005-09-02

My mother did a school research project back in the day and she manage to get a signed letter by Neil Armstrong. She still have it in a box to this day. I remember to have read it.

Reply Score: 1

Tourism
by Treza on Sun 26th Aug 2012 21:16 UTC
Treza
Member since:
2006-01-11

Armstrong spent 3 hours on the moon, saw there was nothing there, and came back with a handful of sand.

Reply Score: 0

Comment by siki_miki
by siki_miki on Sun 26th Aug 2012 21:24 UTC
siki_miki
Member since:
2006-01-17

The guy is an icon, celebrity. Same as Gagarin (even as both were just a tip of the iceberg that made this happen). First guy to be there, and as such will be noted in the history books, although we could say the moon is only a rock out of many (and US merely made a cold war spectacle out of it).

Reply Score: 3

Rest in Peace
by siraf72 on Mon 27th Aug 2012 07:14 UTC
siraf72
Member since:
2006-02-22

A true American hero.

Edit: make that a true human hero.

Edited 2012-08-27 07:14 UTC

Reply Score: 2

v Apple
by zhulien on Mon 27th Aug 2012 10:06 UTC