Linked by the_randymon on Tue 1st Jan 2013 19:11 UTC
General Development Doesn't matter which OS you're running, somewhere in there, your system depends on Perl to get stuff done. Perl turned 25 years old on December 19th. Though venerable old version 5 remains the most popular, many have moved onto Perl 6, which intentionally broke compatibility and still isn't officially 'production ready.' I can't imagine administering a system without Perl though, so tonight I'm raising a glass of champagne in the direction of founder and creator Larry Wall.
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Heh
by WorknMan on Tue 1st Jan 2013 20:37 UTC
WorknMan
Member since:
2005-11-13

I would have to agree wit the 'write only' sentiment. When I was messing around with it, I'd stay up til 2am or so writing code, and when I looked at it the next day, it looked like modem line noise on a terminal screen ;)

Another gripe I had with it was that the Windows extensions seemed a bit janky and poorly documented. Of course, that was years ago, so I'm sure it has improved since then.

However, I have since switched to AutoIt on Windows. It certainly doesn't have all the bells and whistles that Perl does, but for most of the stuff I was doing (usually automating some GUI task), it seemed to do about 98% of everything I needed it to do, and compiles to very small executables. It has been my primary scripting language for years now.

Edited 2013-01-01 20:39 UTC

Reply Score: 7

v RE: Heh
by crpjssssssssssssssss on Tue 1st Jan 2013 20:51 UTC in reply to "Heh"
RE[2]: Heh
by WorknMan on Wed 2nd Jan 2013 20:51 UTC in reply to "RE: Heh"
WorknMan Member since:
2005-11-13

That "write only" part says more about you as a programmer than the language in question.


I guess so, especially since I am not a programmer ;) Just someone who needs to write scripts from time to time.

But I have observed that blaming the programmer seems to be a defense mechanism that pundits use to defend a particular language (Java also comes to mind here). But with languages like AutoIt and Python, I can write code that I can actually read the next day, even with my current skills (or lack thereof).

Reply Score: 3

Comment by rain
by rain on Tue 1st Jan 2013 21:18 UTC
rain
Member since:
2005-07-09

I used to be heavily into perl scripting back in the day. Built a lot of web apps with it.
Then I switched to PHP about 9 years ago and haven't touched Perl since. I still preferred Perl as a language, but PHP offered much more convenience in the web development department.

I partly agree with the "write only" description. Perl will allow you to write some pretty messy code. But it's really as clean as you make it.

Reply Score: 3

Hate it
by tuaris on Tue 1st Jan 2013 23:36 UTC
tuaris
Member since:
2007-08-05

I wish perl would just die.

Reply Score: 2

RE: Hate it
by KrustyVader on Tue 1st Jan 2013 23:48 UTC in reply to "Hate it"
KrustyVader Member since:
2006-10-28

I will tell you something i read a long time ago about Doom (the game) but with Perl in mind.

Perl shall never die!, only the programmers.

Reply Score: 3

a Joy to code, a bummer to maintain
by benali72 on Wed 2nd Jan 2013 00:27 UTC
benali72
Member since:
2008-05-03

Perl -- the ultimate fun for the geek coder, the ultimate nightmare for the drudge maintainer. I'd say if you have an IT project where PHP or Python will do the job, you'd be better off with them. Nevertheless, I sure have enjoyed Perl programming.

Reply Score: 5

God no
by Vanders on Wed 2nd Jan 2013 00:46 UTC
Vanders
Member since:
2005-07-06

Doesn't matter which OS you're running, somewhere in there, your system depends on Perl to get stuff done.


There's not much Perl in Windows.

I also actively avoided any and all Perl in Syllable.

I've always found Perl weird. Its original goal was to be a "glue" language, but we already had that (shell scripts). So instead it's grown into this giant monolithic all-singing, all-dancing blob of CPAN modules that isn't really the least but UNIXy in any real sense.

That in turn has lead people to try and use it as a real language. The MTA written entirely in Perl from a previous jobs still makes me wretch a little bit...

Reply Score: 4

Perl
by ndrw on Wed 2nd Jan 2013 11:02 UTC in reply to "God no"
ndrw Member since:
2009-06-30

You have listed all main reasons I've started using Perl back in late '90s. Yes, it's a perfect glue code. Yes, we have shell scripts but they are a fragmented, incompatible, unportable, inefficient mess. There *is* Perl on Windows and for the most part it is just - Perl.

After a brief experience of writing shell scripts on Linux and trying to deploy them on Solaris I took Perl and it has never fail me since. It is a weird and ugly language but it does its job extremely efficiently (easy to write non-trivial scripts) and is very portable and maintainable. Most of my scripts from a decade before still work and can be used on every single machine I have access to.

Nowadays, I also prefer Python - it's simply a better designed language. But it isn't as reliable and robust as Perl. Primarily because it's being rewritten over and over. This means that virtually all Python 2.2 and 2.4 installations (the only versions I can find in the office) are almost unusable.

Reply Score: 3

RE: Perl
by Soulbender on Thu 3rd Jan 2013 04:19 UTC in reply to "Perl"
Soulbender Member since:
2005-08-18

Yes, we have shell scripts but they are a fragmented, incompatible, unportable, inefficient mess.


I can't tell if you're talking about shell scripts or perl scripts.

But it isn't as reliable and robust as Perl.


I think you mean backwards compatible. I've never had an reliability or robustness problems. On the other hand, I haven't used 2.2 and 2.4 since the mid 2000's.

This means that virtually all Python 2.2 and 2.4 installations (the only versions I can find in the office) are almost unusable.


2.2 and 2.4? Seriously? Last 2.2 release was almost 10 years ago. I'm afraid you'r problem is not with python, it's with the company being stuck in the 1990's ;)
That said, it's perfectly possible to write code that runs on 2.2 as well as 2.7/3. I wouldn't WANT to do it but it can be done.

Edited 2013-01-03 04:20 UTC

Reply Score: 3

Compiler Warnings
by hughobrien on Wed 2nd Jan 2013 02:39 UTC
hughobrien
Member since:
2012-09-09

I felt I had reached a new level of geekiness when I sniggered to see gcc compiling perl with the -Wall flag.

Reply Score: 5

Comment by lucas_maximus
by lucas_maximus on Thu 3rd Jan 2013 14:48 UTC
lucas_maximus
Member since:
2009-08-18

Tend to use it for the odd dirty script on my machine, but I can never imagine it being used to build anything large even though it is.

Reply Score: 3