Linked by Thom Holwerda on Thu 17th Jan 2013 23:36 UTC
Hardware, Embedded Systems "Meet the new ThinkPad X131e Chromebook: A fast booting, highly customizable laptop PC built with rugged features for the daily rigors of K-12 education. The ThinkPad X131e Chromebook simplifies software and security management for school administrators and provides students and teachers with quick access to thousands of apps, education resources and storage." Lenovo is the third OEM to jump into ChromeOS. Chromebooks have been doing well on Amazon, apparently, too. Android tablets, iPads, the Mac, and now Chromebooks - it must be rainy in Redmond.
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os irrelevant
by project_2501 on Thu 17th Jan 2013 23:41 UTC
project_2501
Member since:
2006-03-20

The operating system will become irrelevant.
Its job will be to provide a browser.

Reply Score: 0

RE: os irrelevant
by 0brad0 on Fri 18th Jan 2013 01:28 UTC in reply to "os irrelevant"
0brad0 Member since:
2007-05-05

The operating system will become irrelevant.
Its job will be to provide a browser.


Just like PCs are dying. Please.

Reply Score: 4

RE[2]: os irrelevant
by tylerdurden on Fri 18th Jan 2013 02:22 UTC in reply to "RE: os irrelevant"
tylerdurden Member since:
2009-03-17

No the PC is not dying, that is a strawman. What it is undeniable is that the areas of growth are now elsewhere.

The computing field's growth has always been on the smaller/faster/cheaper category. Up to recently, the PC was the forefront of that category, now it is no longer the case. Smaller/cheaper mobile devices are where the momentum has shifted, once they are smaller/cheaper/and as fast as the PC, then PCs will start to go the way of the workstation, the minicomputer, and the mainframe that went before them.

Some people get too caught out in the specifics of the tool, to the point they miss its essence.

Reply Score: 9

RE[2]: os irrelevant
by mdoverkil on Fri 18th Jan 2013 16:47 UTC in reply to "RE: os irrelevant"
mdoverkil Member since:
2005-09-30

The PC may not be dying, but the form factor is going to change dramatically in the next 10 years or so.

Reply Score: 4

RE: os irrelevant
by moondevil on Fri 18th Jan 2013 06:42 UTC in reply to "os irrelevant"
moondevil Member since:
2005-07-08

Except my browser only shows documents....

Reply Score: 2

RE: os irrelevant
by bassbeast on Fri 18th Jan 2013 12:50 UTC in reply to "os irrelevant"
bassbeast Member since:
2007-11-11

I'm sorry but you are wrong and here is why: Bandwidth caps. Corps are adding nastier and nastier caps here in the states rather than use their profits to buy new lines and the simple fact is that to pack as many features as a fat client program would equal major bandwidth suckage.

This is why I've said all those "We'll stream the games to the user" companies are doomed, they just won't be able to get enough bandwidth to the end user to make the services work. First time the user gets a $200+ bill for playing $50 worth of games that will be the end of that, we'll be seeing the same thing happened to the "cloud" fad in the next few years. BTW we have already gone through one cloud fad in the late 90s, then as now it was bandwidth that killed the idea.

For what you say to become true you would need a MINIMUM of 100Mbps FTTH, 1Gbps would be better if you want it to feel no different than using a traditional fat client program but most of the planet are seeing nowhere near those speeds. Look up the speeds of the major cities in the USA (where a good chunk of the software industry is based) and you'll see speeds around 20Mbps, even in the large metro areas like LA, Miami, Dallas, the lines just haven't kept up with the times and even Netflix is having to pay for caches closer to the users so they don't lose customers to caps.

So I'm sorry friend but until the world is draped in fiber, which at current roll out speed will probably take another 30+ years, its just not gonna happen. The schools that buy this are gonna find out real quick when they get hit for the bill for having to have their own backbone link to feed all these internet only ChromeBooks and that will be the end of that. If Google would combine Chrome with Android like they said they would, give users a true offline mode? it could be a big hit, but until then I'm sorry but most will find it all but worthless without a 24/7/365 roaming connection which at least in the USA would require a WISP or Cellular, both of which are VERY expensive.

Reply Score: 3

RE: os irrelevant
by bentoo on Fri 18th Jan 2013 19:40 UTC in reply to "os irrelevant"
bentoo Member since:
2012-09-21

I agree the OS is irrelevant. The applications are what is important and right now ChromeOS is severely lacking.

Why would anyone buy a Chromebook when for just a little more you can get a fully functional laptop that can run Chrome apps as well as millions of other native apps? I just don't get it.

Reply Score: 1

Comment by marcp
by marcp on Thu 17th Jan 2013 23:58 UTC
marcp
Member since:
2007-11-23

@project_2501 - yeah, right. Just like the hardware became irrelevant. That's why everyone's using Acer. Or Gateway. Or ZTE Chaung Guang whatever [no offense, vendors! I'm sure some of your hardware is actually good. I'm just describing the trends]. [sarcasm off]

Seriously, I always liked ThinkPads. Beautiful, practical, durable hardware. Newer TPs are kinda different from the older ones, but where is development there need to be some trade-offs.
It's still great. I only hope it won't be tied to Google ChromeOS.

Reply Score: 2

...
by Hiev on Fri 18th Jan 2013 00:05 UTC
Hiev
Member since:
2005-09-27

Why would you buy a computer that has Google spying on you all the time?

Reply Score: 0

RE: ...
by bnolsen on Fri 18th Jan 2013 00:32 UTC in reply to "..."
bnolsen Member since:
2006-01-06

If it's cheaper than the windows tax one, then replacing chromeos with a linux distro makes this a good option.

Also I wonder if chromeos isn't easier to secure and lockdown for use than a normal windows install.

Btw I recently got a x130e off the lenovo outlet. The keyboard is just amazing on these things.

Edited 2013-01-18 00:35 UTC

Reply Score: 5

RE[2]: ...
by Doc Pain on Fri 18th Jan 2013 07:46 UTC in reply to "RE: ..."
Doc Pain Member since:
2006-10-08

Btw I recently got a x130e off the lenovo outlet. The keyboard is just amazing on these things.


Looking at the keyboard, there are few things that I've noticed:

1. Even though it claims to run some Android OS, why does it come with a "Windows" advertising key?

2. There is no "Insert" key, only "Delete" at the top right.

3. The "inverted T" cursor block looks a bit strange, especially in regards of the "Page Up" and "Page Down" keys. Isn't that unergonomic or at least uncomfortable?

4. It has a "Fn" key, but no key labels for the numeric block "additional layout" which can be addressed by Fn + letters of the right keyboard half. Also, no "Num Lock" key.

5. No "Scroll Lock" and "Pause / Break" keys.

6. Instead a "Print Screen" key between the right "Alt" and "Ctrl" keys, where usually the context menu key (which is also missing) is placed.

I can only assume that this deviation from default keyboard capabilities has been considered "in line with the software and the purpose of the device", so it's not a major limitation for its future users:

http://googleenterprise.blogspot.de/2013/01/for-schools-new-lenovo-...

Maybe it's safe to assume that the future users won't be typing much, especially not higher amounts of numbers, so probably everything is fine.

I'm fully aware of the fact that I'm a keyboard nazi, and I see things nobody else can see. :-)

Image for reference:

http://www.lenovo.com/shop/americas/content/img_lib/portals/ps/educ...

Reply Score: 2

RE[3]: ...
by bnolsen on Fri 18th Jan 2013 13:01 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: ..."
bnolsen Member since:
2006-01-06

I dunno. I use teminals and vim/elvis so these "extraneous" keys aren't so important to me. I much prefer this pgup/pgdn configuration for web browsing use. The keyboard feel and typing speed I can get is the same as my ergo keyboards, that's what matters.

Seems like your keyboard nazi stuff is all about the fluff and not about choosing applications that properly leverage keyboard usage.

Reply Score: 3

RE[4]: ...
by Doc Pain on Fri 18th Jan 2013 13:36 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: ..."
Doc Pain Member since:
2006-10-08

I much prefer this pgup/pgdn configuration for web browsing use.


That might very well fit nicely on a laptop keyboard in comparison to a normal one. Older ThinkPad keyboards have the typical 2x3 matrix (Insert, Delete, Home, End, Page up, Page down) on the top right which is "too far away", compared to where this block is located on a normal (full size) keyboard.

Seems like your keyboard nazi stuff is all about the fluff and not about choosing applications that properly leverage keyboard usage.


In fact, it's not, as I typically value applications that make good use of the keyboard to allow efficient work. Editors (like vim) are a good example, even some web browsers pay attention to provide a good keyboard interface, while integrating it well with mouse action (for example mouse gestures).

I jsut wanted to point out what looked "atypical" to me when first looking at the keyboard. Note that I consider it the main input method for creating content. For consuming content, it doesn't play a big role, but on the other hand, different device formats (smartphones and tablets) may be better suited for consuming content than a laptop. Revisiting who the laptop is intended for, it should be judged if the keyboard layout (and its "shortcomings" and "incensistencies") match with the software that is provided by the system.

In such an environment, keys like "Scroll Lock" or "Pause / Break" can surely be omitted. Maybe even "Insert" is not needed. Many keys have a certain "historic background" and are important to power users or specific branches only. It heavily depends on how good the software is designed.

Edited 2013-01-18 13:41 UTC

Reply Score: 3

RE: ...
by kwan_e on Fri 18th Jan 2013 01:11 UTC in reply to "..."
kwan_e Member since:
2007-02-18

Why would you buy a computer that has Google spying on you all the time?


Because it almost makes no difference from buying a computer that has Microsoft spying on you all the time? Or Canonical?

* And I'm not sure if Apple computers have anything that is similarly "helpful".

Reply Score: 3

RE[2]: ...
by lucas_maximus on Fri 18th Jan 2013 09:00 UTC in reply to "RE: ..."
lucas_maximus Member since:
2009-08-18

Microsoft doesn't spy on you all the time or I doubt at all.

You can see exactly what information is going out using something like wire-shark.

Reply Score: 2

RE[2]: ...
by tidux on Fri 18th Jan 2013 16:11 UTC in reply to "RE: ..."
tidux Member since:
2011-08-13

`sudo aptitude purge unity-shopping-lens && sudo service lightdm restart` takes care of Canonical's spying.

Reply Score: 3

RE: ...
by Valhalla on Fri 18th Jan 2013 01:52 UTC in reply to "..."
Valhalla Member since:
2006-01-24

How are they 'spying on you all the time'?

Reply Score: 2

RE[2]: ...
by darknexus on Fri 18th Jan 2013 04:51 UTC in reply to "RE: ..."
darknexus Member since:
2008-07-15

How are they 'spying on you all the time'?

You're asking this about Google, a company who's primary source of revenue comes from ads? Ads that result from Google analyzing your search activity, your email, your documents, your music (if you use that service), etc? Wow, how could they possibly be spying on you?

Reply Score: 4

RE[3]: ...
by Valhalla on Fri 18th Jan 2013 06:34 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: ..."
Valhalla Member since:
2006-01-24

Ads that result from Google analyzing your search activity, your email, your documents, your music (if you use that service), etc? Wow, how could they possibly be spying on you?

Obviously they will use information gathered when using their services to present you as a data point against advertisers, I'd say every 'free' service does this, including Bing, just read the end user agreements of these type of services.

Is this what you describe as 'spying'? Because it's not exactly a covert operation, it's kind of common knowledge that when you enter something in a search engine, this will be logged as a statistic together with any other data they have gathered on you, in a web search that would be your browser, operating system, screen resolution, etc, and likely identified through a cookie and thus combined with other searches belonging to the same cookie, ie you.

This is what all these services sell, Google/Bing/Facebook etc, a ball of data consisting of your online interests and habits which is sought after by advertisers.

If I already use Google's services I can't see how I would be more 'spied upon' with ChromeOS than I am now. And I certainly doubt I would be less 'spied upon' by using alternate 'free' services, the same data gathering goes on everywhere.

It's up to you to decide if you think the services offered are worth having your online habits be used for targeted advertising, one way or another you will have to pay for using these services, as it is now you are paying by being a data point for sale.

Reply Score: 5

RE[3]: ...
by Radio on Fri 18th Jan 2013 07:22 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: ..."
Radio Member since:
2009-06-20

You're asking this about Google, a company who's primary source of revenue comes from ads?

Like... TV, newspapers, magazines, sport events, etc?

Oh, and OSnews, too.

Reply Score: 5

RE[3]: ...
by orsg on Fri 18th Jan 2013 08:17 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: ..."
orsg Member since:
2011-02-09

Google doesn't need to spy on you on the OS level. Google does just one thing: provide you with an easier way to get on to the Internet. And once you're there, it's hard to miss sites, that somehow use Google AdWords or some other Google Product, even if you are not directly using GMail or other Google services. That's also the case with Android: You can get vanilla Android for free (actually it's not even legal to bundle selfmade Android distributions with Google Services). All Google needs to do is to give folks web access, this will ensure their income.

Reply Score: 2

RE[3]: ...
by Soulbender on Sat 19th Jan 2013 03:17 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: ..."
Soulbender Member since:
2005-08-18

It's not spying when you have agreed to allow them to do it.

Reply Score: 1

RE[4]: ...
by kwan_e on Sat 19th Jan 2013 05:12 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: ..."
kwan_e Member since:
2007-02-18

It's not spying when you have agreed to allow them to do it.


But what have people actually agreed to? For example, all the information collected by AOL search allowed researchers to track down specific people. Can we actually say that people know what they're agreeing to in this age of one-sided* 100 page EULAs?

* And I don't mean paper, but who benefits.

Reply Score: 2

RE: ...
by ThomasFuhringer on Fri 18th Jan 2013 08:13 UTC in reply to "..."
ThomasFuhringer Member since:
2007-01-25

Guess what, I do not care if they record my search requests. If it helps them to provide a service more taylored to me, I actually benefit from the information they collect.
And since they do it openly it is not spying. It is an agreement.

Reply Score: 2

RE[2]: ...
by flypig on Fri 18th Jan 2013 14:31 UTC in reply to "RE: ..."
flypig Member since:
2005-07-13

It's good to hear that you consider it a fair trade of information for the service.

However, personally I would disagree about it being open. If it were open, you'd have easy access to all of the information that Google collect about you. As far as I'm aware, this is not the case. Moreover, even if you opt-out of using Google's services, it's not clear how much information they nonetheless retain about you.

Unfortunately privacy is also a societal issue, and the decisions other people make affect more than just themselves. Personally I'm very uncomfortable about the quantity of data Google collects and I would much rather privacy was valued more highly.

I'm not saying you're wrong though: everyone makes their own judgement about how they value these things.

Reply Score: 4

Comment by shmerl
by shmerl on Fri 18th Jan 2013 03:01 UTC
shmerl
Member since:
2010-06-08

As long as this trend will extend to all models from Lenovo and will put an end to their notorious participation in the Windows tax scheme - it's a good development (I presume Lenovo doesn't pay for the Chrome OS to Google?). Otherwise I don't see this as anything worth special attention.

Reply Score: 1

RE: Comment by shmerl
by lucas_maximus on Fri 18th Jan 2013 08:58 UTC in reply to "Comment by shmerl"
lucas_maximus Member since:
2009-08-18

How dare Lenovo sell things that in demand!

:facepalm:

Reply Score: 1

RE[2]: Comment by shmerl
by shmerl on Fri 18th Jan 2013 16:14 UTC in reply to "RE: Comment by shmerl"
shmerl Member since:
2010-06-08

They can sell anything they want. Product tying on the other hand has nothing to do with users' demand - it's purely serving MS interests.

Edited 2013-01-18 16:14 UTC

Reply Score: 1

RE[3]: Comment by shmerl
by lucas_maximus on Fri 18th Jan 2013 16:30 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Comment by shmerl"
lucas_maximus Member since:
2009-08-18

They can sell anything they want. Product tying on the other hand has nothing to do with users' demand - it's purely serving MS interests.


It serving theirs and anyone who wants a laptop with Windows on it as well.

Trolling the shit out of every article (this one didn't even mention Microsoft) gets bloody irritating.

You are obsessed, it is rather sad really.

Edited 2013-01-18 16:30 UTC

Reply Score: 3

RE[4]: Comment by shmerl
by kwan_e on Fri 18th Jan 2013 16:39 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: Comment by shmerl"
kwan_e Member since:
2007-02-18

(this one didn't even mention Microsoft)


The "article" is just an ad, but the OSNews write-up did mention Redmond.

Reply Score: 2

RE[4]: Comment by shmerl
by shmerl on Fri 18th Jan 2013 16:59 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: Comment by shmerl"
shmerl Member since:
2010-06-08

It serving theirs
Yes, because of MS rebates and in violation of the antitrust laws which forbid product tying. But as I said above, if this trend is true (Chrome OS pushing out Windows), let's see how they quit their Windows tax enforcement. You seem to have a blind spot for Windows tax, and pretend that the problem doesn't exist. That's silly.

Edited 2013-01-18 17:01 UTC

Reply Score: 1

RE[5]: Comment by shmerl
by Nelson on Fri 18th Jan 2013 19:27 UTC in reply to "RE[4]: Comment by shmerl"
Nelson Member since:
2005-11-29

I'm sure Attorney General shmerl will sue Microsoft for Anti-trust any day now. OSNews is lucky to have legal experts like you.

Reply Score: 2

RE[6]: Comment by shmerl
by shmerl on Fri 18th Jan 2013 19:56 UTC in reply to "RE[5]: Comment by shmerl"
shmerl Member since:
2010-06-08

The fact that companies get away with it until forced doesn't mean that what they do is legal, even if they put it in their EULA. Lenovo already found out about it in court, but they don't seem to learn even on their own mistakes.

Edited 2013-01-18 19:58 UTC

Reply Score: 1

RE[7]: Comment by shmerl
by Nelson on Fri 18th Jan 2013 20:43 UTC in reply to "RE[6]: Comment by shmerl"
Nelson Member since:
2005-11-29

The fact that companies get away with it until forced doesn't mean that what they do is legal, even if they put it in their EULA. Lenovo already found out about it in court, but they don't seem to learn even on their own mistakes.


Likely because:

a) Not a lot of people even do this, so there's no education within the support channels to provide such a service.

b) They still believe they are within their legal rights, and a few lost cases in a few countries, doesn't legal precedent make. If they think that eventually they can fry this fish and get a court to affirm their right to dictate their own return policies (specific laws in countries expressly forbidding this aside)

c) You simply don't see a change because enough people don't care enough to even request such a refund. How would you know if they've changed their policy? Have you recently tried to acquire a refund? I think it is premature to suggest they haven't changed their position when you haven't had an opportunity to check if they have.

Do you honestly think every small claim decision against a company is enough to change their ways? In the US, small claims courts are sympathetic to the individual/consumer and at least here, its hardly a litmus test for any kind of legal policy.

Reply Score: 3

Yes its rainy
by sisora on Fri 18th Jan 2013 08:45 UTC
sisora
Member since:
2011-08-26

In another news Asus and Lg are planning to release Windows Phone8. Windows phone 8 have been doing well lately. Windows Phone, Iphones, BB10, and now firefox phone- yaa it must be rainy in Mountainview. lol

Reply Score: 1

RE: Yes its rainy
by chithanh on Fri 18th Jan 2013 09:42 UTC in reply to "Yes its rainy"
chithanh Member since:
2006-06-18

If it takes ASUS from announcement to release as long as it took Nokia, then Mountain View has nothing to worry about for quite some time.

FirefoxOS could make some inroads into market segments that are currently dominated by Android 2.3 phones. But as long as Google remains Mozilla's default search engine provider, the potential damage will be limited.

Reply Score: 1

RE[2]: Yes its rainy
by sisora on Fri 18th Jan 2013 10:54 UTC in reply to "RE: Yes its rainy"
sisora Member since:
2011-08-26

Exactly the same impact that you have described, will Chromebooks have on Redmond.

Reply Score: 2

RE[3]: Yes its rainy
by chithanh on Fri 18th Jan 2013 14:18 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Yes its rainy"
chithanh Member since:
2006-06-18

There is nothing from Microsoft in the Chromebooks, so every Chromebook sold will reduce Microsoft's grip on the PC industry.

Reply Score: 1

RE[4]: Yes its rainy
by Nelson on Fri 18th Jan 2013 19:29 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: Yes its rainy"
Nelson Member since:
2005-11-29

Is there any indication at all that Chromebooks are selling in appreciable numbers, or that consumers even want (and are not terribly confused by) such a device?

Reply Score: 2

RE[5]: Yes its rainy
by bentoo on Fri 18th Jan 2013 19:45 UTC in reply to "RE[4]: Yes its rainy"
bentoo Member since:
2012-09-21

Is there any indication at all that Chromebooks are selling in appreciable numbers, or that consumers even want (and are not terribly confused by) such a device?


No indication except being on the top of Amazon's laptop sales for >90 days. However, Amazon does not release sales numbers (Google either) so it is anyone's guess.

Reply Score: 2

RE[6]: Yes its rainy
by Nelson on Fri 18th Jan 2013 19:57 UTC in reply to "RE[5]: Yes its rainy"
Nelson Member since:
2005-11-29

Yeah, I've learned not to read too much into it. Lumia's routinely top Amazon charts but it doesn't translate into really blockbuster sales.

Reply Score: 3

RE[7]: Yes its rainy
by chithanh on Sun 20th Jan 2013 13:55 UTC in reply to "RE[6]: Yes its rainy"
chithanh Member since:
2006-06-18

Lumia Amazon ranking was deliberately gamed by Nokia (launch on holiday, cheaper than elsewhere, listed only in small subcategory). No such gaming is apparent from the Samsung Chromebook. In fact the brick-and-mortar stores which sell the Chromebook report high demand as well.

Reply Score: 2

Interested
by the_randymon on Fri 18th Jan 2013 09:42 UTC
the_randymon
Member since:
2005-07-06

I wasn't that into the idea of ChromeOS when it came out but increasingly they're catching my eye. Interesting when they say the specs don't make it a powerful machine. My first laptop - and I wrote a book with it - was PIII with 4G on the hard drive and 555Mhz on the processor. So by that comparison, these Chromebooks are nice and fast.

I was tempted by the Samsung one but Lenovo makes great hardware. Maybe I'll give it a look.

Reply Score: 1

I love the meaningless marketing drivel
by saso on Fri 18th Jan 2013 10:11 UTC
saso
Member since:
2007-04-18

Chromebooks cost less than most high end tablets and according to the IDC, require 69 percent less labor to deploy and 92 percent less labor to support.

I love it when marketing droids try to exactly quantify gains from a given product. "This product is now 56% more awesomer!" Not 55%, or 57%. No, it's exactly 56%. Does anybody fall for this kind of bullshit?

Reply Score: 3

lucas_maximus Member since:
2009-08-18

While I see your point, It does depends how well time is managed.

Reply Score: 2

This is an unexpected move.
by dsmogor on Fri 18th Jan 2013 10:36 UTC
dsmogor
Member since:
2005-09-01

I could understand Samsung launching chromebooks.
Given their production versatility and close cooperation with Google they could afford a product they didn't believe in.
But Lenovo? They seem pretty focused (even their smartphone adventure starts to pay off) and wouldn't release something they think would almost certainly flop, esp. not in the ThinkPad brand. That means they believe chromeos is indeed into something.
Anybody knows what markets is this one targeted?

Reply Score: 3

RE: This is an unexpected move.
by dsmogor on Fri 18th Jan 2013 10:38 UTC in reply to "This is an unexpected move."
dsmogor Member since:
2005-09-01

Of course unless Chromeos is the new freedos for those OEMS.

Reply Score: 2

RE[2]: This is an unexpected move.
by chithanh on Fri 18th Jan 2013 15:32 UTC in reply to "RE: This is an unexpected move."
chithanh Member since:
2006-06-18

Unlike FreeDOS, ChromeOS is actually useful. Complete with web browsing, email, word processing etc.

Reply Score: 2

moondevil Member since:
2005-07-08

Unlike ChromeOS, FreeDOS is actually useful without internet connection. Complete with word processing, games, editors, programming languages and internet access is also possible if really required.

Reply Score: 3

lucas_maximus Member since:
2009-08-18
moondevil Member since:
2005-07-08

Nice one.

A friend of mine was quite found of GeoWorks.

Reply Score: 2

chithanh Member since:
2006-06-18

I don't deny that these are possible, just people are not turning to FreeDOS if they want those.

ChromeOS is not targeted at people without Internet access, though you can work offline if you wish.

Reply Score: 2

RE[4]: This is an unexpected move.
by zima on Tue 22nd Jan 2013 17:50 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: This is an unexpected move."
zima Member since:
2005-07-06

Unlike ChromeOS, FreeDOS is actually useful without internet connection. Complete with word processing, games, editors, programming languages and internet access is also possible if really required.

Though testing this on the so called average consumer would end up... funny-sad. Pretty useless, at best.

Reply Score: 2

bentoo Member since:
2012-09-21

Unlike FreeDOS, ChromeOS is actually useful. Complete with web browsing, email, word processing etc.


Yep. There's never been a web browser, email client, or word processor for DOS. No sir. ;)

Reply Score: 2

chithanh Member since:
2006-06-18

The DOS applications might fulfil 1995's idea of web browsing, email, and word processing.

Reply Score: 2

RE: This is an unexpected move.
by kwan_e on Fri 18th Jan 2013 14:57 UTC in reply to "This is an unexpected move."
kwan_e Member since:
2007-02-18

But Lenovo? They seem pretty focused (even their smartphone adventure starts to pay off) and wouldn't release something they think would almost certainly flop, esp. not in the ThinkPad brand.


But they're selling Windows 8 machines. ;)

Maybe either Windows 8 spooked them, or they see it as an opportunity to test the market with something completely different.

Reply Score: 2

TrackPoint
by Pro-Competition on Fri 18th Jan 2013 16:07 UTC
Pro-Competition
Member since:
2007-08-20

As a fan of the TrackPoint (and third button), I will need to take a look at this. I'm not part of the intended audience, but, if the price it reasonable, I would consider getting one.

Reply Score: 2

RE: TrackPoint
by bnolsen on Fri 18th Jan 2013 19:47 UTC in reply to "TrackPoint"
bnolsen Member since:
2006-01-06

Yup, cost is important here. With samsung's chromebook at 250USD and the acer c7 with celery 847 at 200USD the price could make some difference here. I doubt they're chasing business users with this chromeos x131e.

Ahh, I see 429USD for a unit, but with no indication of which CPU, how much RAM, what kind of storage to be included.

Edited 2013-01-18 19:50 UTC

Reply Score: 2

An actual article
by kwan_e on Fri 18th Jan 2013 16:43 UTC
kwan_e
Member since:
2007-02-18

A more respectable article is now available:

http://arstechnica.com/gadgets/2013/01/lenovos-new-thinkpad-x131e-c...

Reply Score: 2

Comment by JoshuaS
by JoshuaS on Fri 18th Jan 2013 20:30 UTC
JoshuaS
Member since:
2011-09-15

Technically, it always rains in Redmond. ;)

Glad to see this alternative operating system is ( relatively ) thriving! I don't know how great it is for school though. As a visual impaired individual that has always used a laptop in school I must say Microsoft's OneNote is excellently tailored to a student's needs. But, than again, as a European I have no idea what K-12 education is anyways.

Reply Score: 3

rklrkl
Member since:
2005-07-06

I still remain somewhat confused about why a Chromebook exists at all. How is it better than a laptop or netbook (with the Chrome browser if you really must) that can work offline so much more easily?

Couple that issue with the fact that mobile data plans are expensive, free wi-fi isn't often available outside the house and Chromebooks are locked down (have fun trying to put a "proper" Linux on them), I remain struggling to work out what advantage a Chromebook gives you.

No wonder I never see anyone using them when I'm out and about because they become a virtual brick when on the move.

Reply Score: 3

chithanh Member since:
2006-06-18

It is better to many people because it is more simple to use. Compared to a traditional PC, you have to care about a whole lot less things.
Especially the lack of need for backups is nice for a lot of people. If the computer breaks or is lost, just replace with another Chromebook and continue to work. All your data is still there.

That Chromebooks are locked down is only true until you flip the developer switch. Then you can install whatever distro you like.

You can work offline with Chromebooks. The 3G versions come with 100MB/month mobile data plan included. And free Wifi may be more common than you think. Some articles mentioned Starbucks.

While it may not meet the requirements of everyone, it does already for a whole lot of people.

Reply Score: 2

Well no kidding it's raining in Redmond
by tidux on Sat 19th Jan 2013 23:30 UTC
tidux
Member since:
2011-08-13

It's across Lake Washington from Seattle. It rains all the time there. What does that have to do with software again?

Reply Score: 2