Linked by Thom Holwerda on Thu 31st Jan 2013 18:55 UTC
Apple Well, this is either incredibly sad or utterly hilarious. Apple will stop selling the Mac Pro in Europe on 1 March... Because it doesn't comply with "new" European regulations that will come into effect that day. I say "new" between quotation marks because said regulation was announced four years ago. The regulation deals with increased protection requirements concerning electrical ports and fan guards. "The new requirements necessitate fan guards and some increased protection on the ports on the electrical system," explained Apple, "Because Mac Pro is not compliant with the regulations, we do want to meet that regulation and therefore not offer Mac Pro beyond 1 March." So, a standards body is faster at updating its standards than Apple is at updating its Mac Pro. It illustrates just how much Apple cares about pro users. The last significant update to the Mac Pro occurred in 2010, but Tim Cook did promise an update to the product later in 2013.
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Comment by lucas_maximus
by lucas_maximus on Thu 31st Jan 2013 19:11 UTC
lucas_maximus
Member since:
2009-08-18

Not surprised, the few macs we have are iMacs and they are used by the design team.

Us devs get a nice dual Xeon box from HP.

Reply Score: 3

Return of the clones?
by jebb on Thu 31st Jan 2013 19:25 UTC
jebb
Member since:
2006-07-06

In a world where most of Apple's profit comes from non-OSX gear, maybe the best solution to meet the needs of these (very) few users who really require a workstation-class OSX computer is a collaboration with somebody else... Imagine HP offering OSX as an install option on the high-end Z-series workstations (not the smaller ones, too much overlap with the iMac's capabilities there), with Apple's blessing.

Probably unlikely to happen, and that is a bit sad really.

Reply Score: 3

v Blaming the wrong party
by andrewclunn on Thu 31st Jan 2013 19:27 UTC
RE: Blaming the wrong party
by Torbjorn Vik Lunde on Thu 31st Jan 2013 19:34 UTC in reply to "Blaming the wrong party"
Torbjorn Vik Lunde Member since:
2009-09-04

It’s not like the Apple pro community thinks Apple is great at pro stuff these days either.

Reply Score: 4

RE: Blaming the wrong party
by Lava_Croft on Thu 31st Jan 2013 19:36 UTC in reply to "Blaming the wrong party"
Lava_Croft Member since:
2006-12-24

I'll stick to questions for now.

Why is the EU to blame for Apple being unable to comply with EU regulations which were announced 4 years ago?

Is Apple the only company unable to comply with these regulations?

Why is the government over here anti-tech?

[EDIT] You go to use that gif. Congratulations Thom.

Edited 2013-01-31 19:37 UTC

Reply Score: 3

RE: Blaming the wrong party
by andrewclunn on Thu 31st Jan 2013 20:18 UTC in reply to "Blaming the wrong party"
andrewclunn Member since:
2012-11-05

My apologies. Turns out Apple is intending to comply before the end of the year.

http://www.cultofmac.com/213628/apple-forced-to-stop-selling-mac-pr...

This means that, yes, they are just lagging behind in compliance.

Reply Score: 1

RE[2]: Blaming the wrong party
by Lava_Croft on Thu 31st Jan 2013 21:07 UTC in reply to "RE: Blaming the wrong party"
Lava_Croft Member since:
2006-12-24

That leaves the question related to the 'government over here' being anti-tech. Care to elaborate on that?

Reply Score: 4

v RE[3]: Blaming the wrong party
by andrewclunn on Thu 31st Jan 2013 21:33 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Blaming the wrong party"
RE[4]: Blaming the wrong party
by BeamishBoy on Thu 31st Jan 2013 21:56 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: Blaming the wrong party"
BeamishBoy Member since:
2010-10-27

The EU seems to think tech companies are a special source of income by hitting them with multi million euro fines constantly.


I believe the medical term for your condition is "ignorant American."

Willfully ignorant, perhaps, but ignorant nonetheless.

Reply Score: 13

RE[4]: Blaming the wrong party
by Soulbender on Fri 1st Feb 2013 03:33 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: Blaming the wrong party"
Soulbender Member since:
2005-08-18

U.S companies seem to think that the world is their backyard and they have the right to dump their unsafe shit that doesn't pass U.S regulations everywhere else.

Reply Score: 8

RE[5]: Blaming the wrong party
by redshift on Fri 1st Feb 2013 17:31 UTC in reply to "RE[4]: Blaming the wrong party"
redshift Member since:
2006-05-06

U.S companies seem to think that the world is their backyard and they have the right to dump their unsafe shit that doesn't pass U.S regulations everywhere else.


It is EU regulations, not US ones in question. Not sure if you miss typed that or not, because we do push other crap like GMO food that is not up to EU safety standards. In the case of these computers though, I think the EU may be over nerfing.

Once you get past the power supply everything is a safe 12 volts. What exactly is the EU trying to protect you from on the ports? What exactly is the nature of the change needed for the ports to meet EU standards?

I had a G5 (so I don't know how different the airflow is on the intel Mac Pros, but I thought it was similar) and I did not think the fans were a safety issue on that model. By the book you were not supposed to have it powered up with the access panel off and I believe they had a sensor to stop the fans when the inner airflow panel was open.

It makes me wonder what the underside of a EU approved lawnmower looks like if they are putting guards on parts that are already covered by access panels. It seems like the EU would want to protect the people who disregard the manual and try to change blades with it running.

It does go both ways though....
Suzuki recently pulled out of the US auto-market citing that it is to costly to meet us safety/emissions standards as one of the reason for leaving. I was kind of surprised with that, because I really like my Kizashi and though they had something that blended the style and quality of a VW fused with a Honda and then combined it with the all wheel drive of a Subaru.

Edited 2013-02-01 17:32 UTC

Reply Score: 2

RE[6]: Blaming the wrong party
by ndrw on Fri 1st Feb 2013 20:36 UTC in reply to "RE[5]: Blaming the wrong party"
ndrw Member since:
2009-06-30

I haven't read the standard (IEC 60950-1) but citing other sources:

"At issue are the large fans within the Mac Pro. Since they are unprotected, it would be possible to touch the fan blades," MacWorld reports Apple as saying.


Is it true you can touch fan blades? That does look like a major oversight. Even if this wasn't in the standard any quality equipment should come with a fan hidden behind a guard - no excuse for Apple. True, I wouldn't put my fingers in the fan, but a toddler could very much try it.

"According to Apple, the new requirements necessitate fan guards and some increased protection on the ports on the electrical system."

Not sure about Apple but some time ago I tried to get Sony to fix an electrical leak from the power supply to the metal casing of the laptop (which was noticeable at 110V~ and rather unpleasant at 240V~). Their response was that this amount of leakage is normal and meets all legal requirements. So, I am not going to complain that EU is making regulations tougher.

Reply Score: 2

RE[6]: Blaming the wrong party
by JAlexoid on Fri 1st Feb 2013 23:32 UTC in reply to "RE[5]: Blaming the wrong party"
JAlexoid Member since:
2009-05-19

Once you get past the power supply everything is a safe 12 volts. What exactly is the EU trying to protect you from on the ports? What exactly is the nature of the change needed for the ports to meet EU standards?

I'm pretty sure you're not an electrical engineer, let alone read the regulation.

Reply Score: 3

RE[6]: Blaming the wrong party
by Soulbender on Sat 2nd Feb 2013 01:40 UTC in reply to "RE[5]: Blaming the wrong party"
Soulbender Member since:
2005-08-18

Not sure if you miss typed that or not, because we do push other crap like GMO food that is not up to EU safety standards.


I was speaking more generally rather than about this particular case (which is obviously about E.U regulations).

Reply Score: 2

RE[4]: Blaming the wrong party
by JAlexoid on Fri 1st Feb 2013 15:49 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: Blaming the wrong party"
JAlexoid Member since:
2009-05-19

I hear only about fines given out to tech companies, therefore only tech companies get fined.

Reply Score: 3

v RE[5]: Blaming the wrong party
by andrewclunn on Fri 1st Feb 2013 15:56 UTC in reply to "RE[4]: Blaming the wrong party"
RE[6]: Blaming the wrong party
by JAlexoid on Fri 1st Feb 2013 23:30 UTC in reply to "RE[5]: Blaming the wrong party"
JAlexoid Member since:
2009-05-19

Your complaint was "They fine only the tech companies!". So, yeah... that they fine everyone is a reasonable response.

Reply Score: 3

RE[6]: Blaming the wrong party
by Soulbender on Sat 2nd Feb 2013 01:42 UTC in reply to "RE[5]: Blaming the wrong party"
Soulbender Member since:
2005-08-18

It's called regulations and they are needed because it is painfully obvious at this point in time that the "free market" is unable to regulate itself in a satisfactory way.

Reply Score: 4

RE[7]: Blaming the wrong party
by BeamishBoy on Sat 2nd Feb 2013 03:24 UTC in reply to "RE[6]: Blaming the wrong party"
BeamishBoy Member since:
2010-10-27

It really is astonishing that there are still people in this world - in the US, no less! - who believe regulation to be a bad thing. It's as though caution and the idea of learning from one's mistakes are things to be crushed wherever they're encountered.

We are utterly doomed as a species.

Reply Score: 2

RE: Blaming the wrong party
by tails92 on Fri 1st Feb 2013 11:23 UTC in reply to "Blaming the wrong party"
tails92 Member since:
2007-10-07

There's some truth in what you say. Many times innovation and the launch of new products to the market are slowed down because of unnecessary regulations. I mean in the EU some things that are not required at all by US and Japan regulations are mandatory.. and the US and Japan regulations are considered to be of a high standard, but hey, more business for European certification authorities!

This is especially bad for small companies which are trying to enter the market; more regulations != better results, but in Europe regulations = good, regardless if they are useless or not. No problem for the big guys, a royal PITA for the small guy who is just trying to make a living with his company, and who has to bear huge costs just to bring a product to the market.

It is sad to see you voted down to -11. I voted you up.

The classic example are cars. In Europe they are over-regulated to the point that you cannot do any meaningful modification to the vehicle, as if the state built the car and gave you it as a gift (yeah.. really?). In the US and in Australia, regulations are very permissive when it comes to tuning and modifications, yet I don't see cars burning down.

Such a shame that people don't think before voting down.

Reply Score: 0

RE[2]: Blaming the wrong party
by M.Onty on Fri 1st Feb 2013 12:09 UTC in reply to "RE: Blaming the wrong party"
M.Onty Member since:
2009-10-23

I agree. Look at this;

"The new requirements necessitate fan guards ..."

Consider how many people have seriously harmed themselves on computer fans in the past decade. Consider whether the sum total of those people, if greater than nil, wouldn't also be the sort of people who could accidentally decapitate themselves with a walnut, and possibly have in the intervening years. Now consider the amount of money the EU has spent on paying salaries, expenses, test equipment and long lunches in order to come up with this particular jewel and ones like it.

Reply Score: 1

RE[2]: Blaming the wrong party
by BushLin on Fri 1st Feb 2013 12:16 UTC in reply to "RE: Blaming the wrong party"
BushLin Member since:
2011-01-26

Please cite some examples of these regulations of which you speak.

I'm not aware of any useless restrictions on vehicle modification, it's a fairly big industry in the UK. Only restriction I can think of are higher premiums from insurance companies who (probably rightly) assume you're going to drive like an idiot with performance upgrades on a small hatchback.

Reply Score: 2

RE[2]: Blaming the wrong party
by JAlexoid on Fri 1st Feb 2013 15:46 UTC in reply to "RE: Blaming the wrong party"
JAlexoid Member since:
2009-05-19

regardless if they are useless or not.

Sure... One might say that food industry regulations are not required, because if you get sick when eating at a restaurant you can just "vote with your feet".(You shouldn't care that you can actually die if poisoned)


The classic example are cars.

Yes, the classic example will be you driving in front of me while I'm on a bicycle and spewing a mixture of exhaust and uncumbusted gasoline, just because you made some modifications. There are requirements for CO2 emissions that you have to pass, and if you don't pass it with your modifications then tough luck. The environment is not your private property.

Such a shame that people don't think before voting down.

Yet some people see the ignorance in his post. The regulation is very old now and has a lot of small adjustments for new equipment for safety and efficiency.

You are just agreeing because you dislike some regulations.

Reply Score: 4

v RE[2]: Blaming the wrong party
by andrewclunn on Fri 1st Feb 2013 18:42 UTC in reply to "RE: Blaming the wrong party"
RE[3]: Blaming the wrong party
by ndrw on Fri 1st Feb 2013 21:23 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Blaming the wrong party"
ndrw Member since:
2009-06-30

I've voted you up on the basis that you made a good point about regulations inhibiting entrepreneurship, so there was something factual in your comment. But, frankly speaking, the rest of it was incorrect, hateful and generally rubbish. Somehow it doesn't stop you from calling others (Europeans) "nationalists" just because they didn't like your rant. Go back to AOL or wherever you came from.

Reply Score: 4

RE[4]: Blaming the wrong party
by JAlexoid on Fri 1st Feb 2013 23:37 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: Blaming the wrong party"
JAlexoid Member since:
2009-05-19

Reduced entrepreneurship may be the cause of regulations that protect the general public, but we're OK with that. Anyone saying that they're over the line, has really not worked in a regulated field.

Are there overbearing regulations? - Yes.
Are there a lot of overbearing regulations? - Not by a long shot.
What are the reasons for reduced entrepreneurship in EU? - Strong employee protections, not regulations.

Reply Score: 3

RE[2]: Blaming the wrong party
by Soulbender on Sat 2nd Feb 2013 04:15 UTC in reply to "RE: Blaming the wrong party"
Soulbender Member since:
2005-08-18

The classic example are cars. In Europe they are over-regulated to the point that you cannot do any meaningful modification to the vehicle, as if the state built the car and gave you it as a gift (yeah.. really?)


No, not really.

Reply Score: 2

Maybe...
by bowkota on Thu 31st Jan 2013 19:33 UTC
bowkota
Member since:
2011-10-12

The optimists among us, might speculate that this points to the release of the New Mac Pro before March the 1st.

In any case, I'm really curious to see what they're coming out with. I won't be buying one anytime soon but I'd bet there's a new redesign for it and that's always interesting.

Reply Score: 3

RE: Maybe...
by siraf72 on Fri 1st Feb 2013 10:52 UTC in reply to "Maybe..."
siraf72 Member since:
2006-02-22

I really hope you're right.

Reply Score: 2

*sigh*
by tessmonsta on Thu 31st Jan 2013 19:49 UTC
tessmonsta
Member since:
2009-07-16

So Apple's response is, "We don't want to change our manufacturing process or modify existing inventory because it costs us too much and we don't have to at home."

As someone that's experienced house current first hand more than once, had PSUs blow up in my hands, and RF burns in my ear canal... Yes, more safety please.

Reply Score: 5

RE: *sigh*
by ndrw on Thu 31st Jan 2013 20:09 UTC in reply to "*sigh*"
ndrw Member since:
2009-06-30

RF burns in my ear canal


Is that even possible?

Reply Score: 3

RE[2]: *sigh*
by tessmonsta on Thu 31st Jan 2013 20:18 UTC in reply to "RE: *sigh*"
tessmonsta Member since:
2009-07-16

Ungrounded transmitter -> UPS -> 2A USB charger -> Nexus One -> headphones -> ear.

Also made my phone crash.

Admittedly, it was stupid of me to operate the TX without grounding it properly. I was in an apartment at the time with no access to a ground rod, and no proper house grounding. I had run an antenna radial into the apartment which probably induced the current as well. Granted, it was a portable transmitter, so it could operate without a ground if necessary. My current set-up is a lot safer. Thank the Universe I was running QRP at 5 watts instead of a QRO or 100 or I would have needed a run to the hospital.

Reply Score: 5

RE[3]: *sigh*
by Bill Shooter of Bul on Thu 31st Jan 2013 20:59 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: *sigh*"
Bill Shooter of Bul Member since:
2006-07-14

I'm glad you're okay, but I don't understand what you were doing. What kind of a transmitter were you using? What was the purpose of hooking it up?

Like a am/fm radio transmitter or an wifi transmitter? Ham radio maybe? What was the relationship between that and the nexus? They just happened to plugged in the same UPS?

Reply Score: 2

RE[4]: *sigh*
by tessmonsta on Thu 31st Jan 2013 21:17 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: *sigh*"
tessmonsta Member since:
2009-07-16

It was a Yaesu FT817ND transceiver. I was working the 14Mhz Ham Radio band at the time. One of the radials was only a few feet behind me, running basically parallel with the USB/headphone cable combination.

Reply Score: 1

RE[3]: *sigh*
by jared_wilkes on Thu 31st Jan 2013 21:46 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: *sigh*"
jared_wilkes Member since:
2011-04-25

I voted funny because this is utterly retarded.

Reply Score: 3

RE[3]: *sigh*
by M.Onty on Fri 1st Feb 2013 11:57 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: *sigh*"
M.Onty Member since:
2009-10-23

I think its fair to suggest that your operating methods were more of a health hazard than the industrial regulation in that instance.

Reply Score: 2

RE[4]: *sigh*
by tessmonsta on Fri 1st Feb 2013 14:53 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: *sigh*"
tessmonsta Member since:
2009-07-16

I think its fair to suggest that your operating methods were more of a health hazard than the industrial regulation in that instance.


No argument there. It's what I had at the time, and years ago. I learned a lot from that experience, despite the training I had already received to pass three separate license tests. RF can be a tricky thing.

This is also why I'm all for a little more safety in consumer equipment. You don't need a license to own and operate a Mac Pro. Dust is a bigger factor in computers than any transceiver I've cracked open. Children are a lot more likely to be around a running tower computer unattended, which is an X factor in a variety of ways. Although in this instance I'm thinking of tiny fingers exploring fan grilles. Yes, probably only a minor cut and a crying fit, but if a little change in the design can make that a little less likely, why not?

Reply Score: 2

RE[5]: *sigh*
by M.Onty on Fri 1st Feb 2013 15:48 UTC in reply to "RE[4]: *sigh*"
M.Onty Member since:
2009-10-23


This is also why I'm all for a little more safety in consumer equipment [...] Although in this instance I'm thinking of tiny fingers exploring fan grilles. Yes, probably only a minor cut and a crying fit, but if a little change in the design can make that a little less likely, why not?


Because those little changes in design cost companies money which costs customers money. And because those little changes cost regulators money which costs taxpayers money. And because getting a minor cut and crying fit after sticking your fingers into a whirring, bleeping slab of machinery is a valuable life lesson that its not worth spending money on eradicating.

Despite that, I wouldn't argue against safety regulation en masse. Just lots of individual examples of it.

Reply Score: 0

Make but can't sell?
by MYOB on Thu 31st Jan 2013 20:04 UTC
MYOB
Member since:
2005-06-29

These would be the Mac Pros that are actually manufactured in Europe, by Apple directly - or has that even been dropped?

There was *something* being made on the factory floor when I was in the factory (supplier - to an a non technical part) yesterday, anyway.

Reply Score: 2

comment
by pandronic on Thu 31st Jan 2013 21:34 UTC
pandronic
Member since:
2006-05-18

The problem is that Apple is changing from a company for snobs that think they are creative to a company for your average Joe ... and they are hypocrites about it.

Reply Score: 4

RE: comment
by moondevil on Thu 31st Jan 2013 22:38 UTC in reply to "comment"
moondevil Member since:
2005-07-08

Just returning to their former self, before Jobs returned.

Reply Score: 3

RE[2]: comment
by silviucc on Thu 31st Jan 2013 22:52 UTC in reply to "RE: comment"
silviucc Member since:
2009-12-05

Just returning to their former self, before Jobs returned.

Nah, actually Jobs himself said in an interview something along the lines of "enterprise customers don't know what they want" which translated means "enterprise customers have specific needs that we can't fill with our current and future crap. ah well, there are still the home dudes that buy it like crazy. screw enterprise".

So they first slashed their server line and now the Mac Pro line. Not a big deal IMO.

Reply Score: 5

RE[3]: comment
by moondevil on Fri 1st Feb 2013 07:31 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: comment"
moondevil Member since:
2005-07-08

Well he also said that about customers in general.

Reply Score: 3

Aren't you all Post PC yet?
by thesunnyk on Thu 31st Jan 2013 23:18 UTC
thesunnyk
Member since:
2010-05-21

Oh you silly luddites, haven't you heard? Everything's "Post-PC" now. Whatever you need to do can be done faster and better on an iPhone and iPad combo. If you're still thinking of desktop PCs then you're stuck in the 90s.

You know what I think when there's serious work to be done? "There's an app for that!"

Reply Score: 4

RE: Aren't you all Post PC yet?
by marcp on Thu 31st Jan 2013 23:30 UTC in reply to "Aren't you all Post PC yet?"
marcp Member since:
2007-11-23

It's highly debatable. I can't work on tablets [and - god forbid - on not-so-smart-phones]. These are just toys, they never made my job done. They lack almost everything, starting from keyboard and ending on processing power. It's not about being luddite, it's rather about being serious Joe, who needs to do his job. Period. Entertainment in free time? cool. Bring me more tablets.

I won't even talk about security and privacy issuess. More apps - less transparency. That's what I observe.

Reply Score: 3

RE[2]: Aren't you all Post PC yet?
by jebb on Fri 1st Feb 2013 07:31 UTC in reply to "RE: Aren't you all Post PC yet?"
jebb Member since:
2006-07-06

Woosh!

Reply Score: 3

wow
by fran on Thu 31st Jan 2013 23:41 UTC
fran
Member since:
2010-08-06

Didn't the CEO said something in the line of "We have something really special coming" for the MacPro line.

http://www.macworld.com/article/1167247/cook_apple_planning_profess...

http://www.engadget.com/2012/06/12/andy-hertzfeld-mac-pro-refresh-2...

Some guys really need those Macpro's. Especially the Logic, Final Cut pro guys.
What is more surprising to me is that although Apple manage to release new iPhones and iPads every year the MacPro has not seen a major update in such a long time.
How can they not have a new, regulation compliant machine before this deadline?

Edited 2013-01-31 23:42 UTC

Reply Score: 5

RE: wow
by BushLin on Fri 1st Feb 2013 10:07 UTC in reply to "wow"
BushLin Member since:
2011-01-26

Gotta feel for the Music guys, Apple buy Emagic/Logic and stop releasing a Windows version. Fast forward a few years and your options are even more limited with hardware...

Reply Score: 4

Nerf
by redshift on Fri 1st Feb 2013 00:50 UTC
redshift
Member since:
2006-05-06

If you are likely to hurt yourself on the fans inside a mac pro, you probably were not qualified to have the case open in the first place.

Reply Score: 1

Comment by Luminair
by Luminair on Fri 1st Feb 2013 06:42 UTC
Luminair
Member since:
2007-03-30

Apple knows their Mac pro sales in Europe and they know their launch date for its replacement. So they know this doesn't matter. Quit complaining sissies

Reply Score: 1

Comment by MOS6510
by MOS6510 on Fri 1st Feb 2013 13:49 UTC
MOS6510
Member since:
2011-05-12

If they are going to come out with a new Mac Pro is doesn't make sense to announce they are going to cease sales.

Anyone thinking about getting a Mac Pro will now get something else.

The new iMacs are so powerful they are basically power workstations anyway, but they lack the expandability of the Mac Pro.

It's beyond me why Apple almost seemed to have forgotten about the Mac Pro. Without redesigning it (the looks) it wouldn't be too difficult to at least keep increasing the specifications.

My guess is they don't make a lot of money with it so they don't invest much in it either.

Reply Score: 3

A serious dilemma
by BallmerKnowsBest on Fri 1st Feb 2013 17:00 UTC
BallmerKnowsBest
Member since:
2008-06-02

Ahaha, this must be terrible for Apple fanbois in Europe. It forces them into making a very difficult choice: how can they engage lazy knee-jerk US-bashing/pro-EU chest-thumping, AND still remain loyal to their beloved Apple? Decisions, decisions!

Reply Score: 0

Comment by Anonymous Penguin
by Anonymous Penguin on Sat 2nd Feb 2013 15:34 UTC
Anonymous Penguin
Member since:
2005-07-06

It illustrates just how much Apple cares about pro users.


Same as the 17" MacBook Pro: most used MacBook by pro users, axed without a second thought.

Reply Score: 2

Think Like Apple
by tomcat on Sat 2nd Feb 2013 21:10 UTC
tomcat
Member since:
2006-01-06

Apple is dominated by a culture of aesthetic-driven engineering. Much of it is well thought out and well-reasoned, but I'm guessing in this case that the company tried to negotiate an exemption from the regulation while one of the goateed beret-wearing designer types tried to come up with an aesthetically pleasing design and failed. I think Apple would rather pull a (niche) product from the market than introduce a design that offends its sensibilities. And make no mistake, this is a niche product for them. If this had been the iPhone, Apple would have moved heaven and earth to get a fix within weeks.

Edited 2013-02-02 21:10 UTC

Reply Score: 2