Linked by rohan_p on Wed 6th Feb 2013 11:24 UTC
OSNews, Generic OSes FreeDOS - the drop-in, open source replacement for MS-DOS - was started after Microsoft announced that starting from Windows 95, DOS would play a background role at best for users. Almost two decades later, FreeDOS has survived and, as its creator explains in the interview, is still being actively developed, despite achieving its initial aim of an MS-DOS compatible OS, which quite frankly is somewhat amazing.
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Comment by MOS6510
by MOS6510 on Wed 6th Feb 2013 12:20 UTC
MOS6510
Member since:
2011-05-12

Maybe I should give it another go, because the last time I tried it it crashed on the first DOS program I tried and I also encountered a number of bugs with FreeDOS itself.

Reply Score: 2

RE: Comment by MOS6510
by Bill Shooter of Bul on Thu 7th Feb 2013 18:51 UTC in reply to "Comment by MOS6510"
Bill Shooter of Bul Member since:
2006-07-14

Really? When did you last try it. I had our custom embedded system working on it ten years ago, working better on free dos than it did on the commercial dos clone it was written for. (I never convinced management to switch, though)

Reply Score: 2

RE[2]: Comment by MOS6510
by MOS6510 on Thu 7th Feb 2013 20:39 UTC in reply to "RE: Comment by MOS6510"
MOS6510 Member since:
2011-05-12

It may have been last year or the year before, but I'm pretty sure it was version 1.x. I installed it in VirtualBox. Maybe it doesn't behave well in there.

Next time I'll try it on a real PC.

Reply Score: 2

RE[3]: Comment by MOS6510
by ssokolow on Fri 8th Feb 2013 01:30 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Comment by MOS6510"
ssokolow Member since:
2010-01-21

It may have been last year or the year before, but I'm pretty sure it was version 1.x. I installed it in VirtualBox. Maybe it doesn't behave well in there.

Next time I'll try it on a real PC.


Quite possibly. The DOSCore website actually mentions that they've had a lot of reports of problems under VMs and that, following their most recent set of updates, Microsoft VirtualPC is still the only VM that they test with often enough to work as intended out of the box.

Apparently there are problems with VirtualBox unless you change the emulated chipset to ICH9... which currently leaves DOSCore with no networking support.

Edited 2013-02-08 01:31 UTC

Reply Score: 3

RE[3]: Comment by MOS6510
by Bill Shooter of Bul on Fri 8th Feb 2013 16:42 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Comment by MOS6510"
Bill Shooter of Bul Member since:
2006-07-14

Or it could just be a modern pc hardware issue. I mean we were using pentium I class processors running at 150-230 mhz. Stuff that was designed to run dos/windows 95.

Reply Score: 2

RE[4]: Comment by MOS6510
by MOS6510 on Fri 8th Feb 2013 17:10 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: Comment by MOS6510"
MOS6510 Member since:
2011-05-12

ssokolow mentioned FreeDOS does have issues running on virtual hardware. If your stuff runs fine I guess it's safe to assume FreeDOS works pretty fine on real hardware.

Next time I'll use a real PC.

Reply Score: 2

Comment by ssokolow
by ssokolow on Wed 6th Feb 2013 13:15 UTC
ssokolow
Member since:
2010-01-21

FreeDOS is an interesting beast in that, like Linux in embedded devices, it's a lot more popular than many
people realize.

I think every bootable disk or disk image I've ever received from a motherboard manufacturer has been running FreeDOS for things like its BIOS flasher EXEs.

(And, of course, it's also a useful source of utilities if you want to pimp out your DOSBox setup)

Reply Score: 5

RE: Comment by ssokolow
by JAlexoid on Wed 6th Feb 2013 13:46 UTC in reply to "Comment by ssokolow"
JAlexoid Member since:
2009-05-19

Because it's barely an OS, but in a good way.

Reply Score: 2

RE[2]: Comment by ssokolow
by ferrels on Wed 6th Feb 2013 13:54 UTC in reply to "RE: Comment by ssokolow"
ferrels Member since:
2006-08-15

Oh come on now....that's like saying Linux without X, Gnome or KDE running on top of it makes it "barely" an OS. FreeDOS is worlds ahead of the old MS-DOS we remember. There's nothing stopping anyone from running a decent GUI on top of FreeDOS.

Reply Score: 1

RE[3]: Comment by ssokolow
by JAlexoid on Wed 6th Feb 2013 14:20 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Comment by ssokolow"
JAlexoid Member since:
2009-05-19

I expect people on OSNews to know the basic functionality of modern OS'es and features available in Linux kernel(even without the init daemon)

Reply Score: 2

RE[4]: Comment by ssokolow
by Zbigniew on Thu 7th Feb 2013 18:44 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: Comment by ssokolow"
Zbigniew Member since:
2008-08-28

An OS on its own is of little value. We need it to run the programs on the computer - and for such purpose "barely an OS" seems to be quite enough.

Reply Score: 2

Used it
by Drunkula on Wed 6th Feb 2013 13:20 UTC
Drunkula
Member since:
2009-09-03

Used it a few times, mostly in VMs and just to recover old stuff or play old DOS-based games. Works well enough. Hadn't got used to the extensions, though, as I hadn't needed them [yet].

Reply Score: 2

DOSCore
by judgen on Wed 6th Feb 2013 19:59 UTC
judgen
Member since:
2006-07-12

Doscore is actually at the point where it is very usable as a Desktop. Installed ontop of Freedos or eDrDOS (for that lovely USB support) It is great for me, small speedy and cost almost nothing.

Finding suitable hardware can be tricky nowadays though.

I would not use it as my standard desktop, but as it is fully compatible with the old PLC devices i program i boot into it now and then since regular DOS has no multitasking what so ever whilst doscore has pseudo multitasking.

The reason i mention it is that whilst OS/2 is better at virtually everything DOS has some benefits.

Reply Score: 3

RE: DOSCore
by PaxD75 on Thu 7th Feb 2013 10:50 UTC in reply to "DOSCore"
PaxD75 Member since:
2012-03-31

I like the work DOSCore is doing. Also following another 'distro' that has opted, instead, to use 4dos as its' command processor - LightDOS.

It's nice to see continued development in this area by both FreeDOS and 3rd-parties working on some fun solutions. Good interview by Jim Hall in that he continues to see the project moving forward - beyond fulfilling the original goals of DOS compatibility.

Reply Score: 2