Linked by Thom Holwerda on Sun 24th Feb 2013 12:33 UTC
Windows "The public preview, first reported by win8china, will launch within the next few months, allowing existing Windows 8 users to test and provide feedback before Microsoft readies the final version of Windows Blue. We understand that Microsoft is aiming to only have one preview release for Blue. Features are still being prepared for Blue, but one of the biggest changes is an improvement to the search charm functionality." Whatever. Windows Blue needs to address two things: application loading times and in-application performance, and the Mail application. Everything else is fluff.
Order by: Score:
Comment by Wafflez
by Wafflez on Sun 24th Feb 2013 15:17 UTC
Wafflez
Member since:
2011-06-26

Windows 9 already? Soon Microsoft will hit Windows 94 and there will be some confusion.

And what's with this version craze? Not so long ago I remember using Firefox 3.6, yesterday wanted to use one extension and went to download Firefox — Firefox 19. What the hell.

Edited 2013-02-24 15:19 UTC

Reply Score: 4

RE: Comment by Wafflez
by Nelson on Sun 24th Feb 2013 16:10 UTC in reply to "Comment by Wafflez"
Nelson Member since:
2005-11-29

I don't think it'll be called Windows 9, they've sunk too much money too recently into making Windows 8 familiar in the household.

Reply Score: 3

RE: Comment by Wafflez
by WorknMan on Sun 24th Feb 2013 23:10 UTC in reply to "Comment by Wafflez"
WorknMan Member since:
2005-11-13

Windows 9 already? Soon Microsoft will hit Windows 94 and there will be some confusion.


I kind of miss the XP days, when we were only getting a new version every 6-7 years. If they start releasing every year or two, I've got to constantly worry about whether all of my apps and drivers will still work, if I want to stay current. And most new features that they add, I either have in 3rd party apps already, or I just end up turning off.

Reply Score: 5

RE[2]: Comment by Wafflez
by malxau on Sun 24th Feb 2013 23:36 UTC in reply to "RE: Comment by Wafflez"
malxau Member since:
2005-12-04

I kind of miss the XP days, when we were only getting a new version every 6-7 years...


Note what happened prior to XP: between 1998 and 2001 we had 98, 98SE, ME, 2000 and XP - five releases, four years.

What Vista really represented was accumulating all of that change into one very disruptive release rather than issuing change incrementally. Staying on XP represented the "calm before the storm" as it were.

Reply Score: 4

RE[3]: Comment by Wafflez
by whitehornmatt on Mon 25th Feb 2013 00:33 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Comment by Wafflez"
whitehornmatt Member since:
2005-07-07

I think Blue will probably share a lot in common with the 98 to 98SE transition, apparently it was a $20 update for Windows 98 owners - a slightly wider net of changes than a service pack, but not enough to result in a visible name change.

I am a happy Windows 8 user for the improvements in speed and I quite like the live tiles - but certainly have issues with crashing in metro apps and there's a lot of functionality to be desired in Mail - though it is now my default email client because of how much I like notifications in Windows 8; same reason I use Xbox Music over my preferred Zune.

I'm interested though how Blue will fit with enterprise - a yearly update strategy makes no sense when we're only now seeing businesses start to move to Windows 7.

Reply Score: 2

RE[4]: Comment by Wafflez
by lucas_maximus on Mon 25th Feb 2013 08:32 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: Comment by Wafflez"
lucas_maximus Member since:
2009-08-18

I think we will see ESR releases.

Also I think there is a big push to make companies move towards BDD/TDD style development processes.

Reply Score: 2

RE[4]: Comment by Wafflez
by Nelson on Mon 25th Feb 2013 10:08 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: Comment by Wafflez"
Nelson Member since:
2005-11-29

Businesses were skipping out anyway because they just completed Win7 transitions (and thank God, XP needs to go.).

I think things will work same as before. 3 year schedule for major releases with yearly maintenance updates.

Businesses can choose to target a major release if they'd like, or if they're unhappy with the OS, wait until an interim update or the next major release. If anything it provides more flexibility.

Reply Score: 2

RE[5]: Comment by Wafflez
by jnemesh on Tue 26th Feb 2013 18:36 UTC in reply to "RE[4]: Comment by Wafflez"
jnemesh Member since:
2008-04-08

Nope, they are going to a subscription based model with constant upgrades instead of monolithic upgrades every few years. This means the OS will be in a constant state of fail. By the time they stabilize one version, they will auto-upgrade you to the next, undoubtedly breaking all kinds of crap in the process.

Reply Score: 1

Comment by Stephen!
by Stephen! on Sun 24th Feb 2013 15:46 UTC
Stephen!
Member since:
2007-11-24

Is it Windows 9 though? Or more on par with a Service Pack?

Reply Score: 2

RE: Comment by Stephen!
by znby on Sun 24th Feb 2013 16:05 UTC in reply to "Comment by Stephen!"
znby Member since:
2012-02-03

Perhaps a point release, i.e. Windows 8.1

Reply Score: 2

RE[2]: Comment by Stephen!
by Wafflez on Sun 24th Feb 2013 16:17 UTC in reply to "RE: Comment by Stephen!"
Wafflez Member since:
2011-06-26

Windows 8 SE.

Reply Score: 7

RE[2]: Comment by Stephen!
by panzi on Sun 24th Feb 2013 19:01 UTC in reply to "RE: Comment by Stephen!"
panzi Member since:
2006-01-22

Actually Windows 8 is Windows version 6.2:
http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/windows/desktop/ms724832~*~...

Edited 2013-02-24 19:02 UTC

Reply Score: 4

RE[3]: Comment by Stephen!
by phoenix on Tue 26th Feb 2013 00:06 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Comment by Stephen!"
phoenix Member since:
2005-07-11

Windows NT 6.2. Although the version numbering started at 3.1 to coincide with Windows 3.1.

Windows NT 3.1
Windows NT 3.5
Windows NT 4.0
Windows 2000 aka NT 5.0
Windows XP aka NT 5.1
* Windows XP 64-bit (Server 2003 with XP GUI) aka NT 5.2
Windows Vista aka NT 6.0
Windows 7 aka NT 6.1
Windows 8 aka NT 6.2

* This one is usually not mentioned as part of the client OS versioning, as it wasn't really a client OS. Just a client GUI over the server OS kernel.

The non-NT kernels had their own version numbers, along with the version of MS-DOS they ran on.

And, if you count the client kernel releases, you see why kernel version 6.1 is known as "Windows 7". ;)

Reply Score: 3

RE: Comment by Stephen!
by Nelson on Sun 24th Feb 2013 16:09 UTC in reply to "Comment by Stephen!"
Nelson Member since:
2005-11-29

Windows 8.5 or 8 Refresh. They seem to be moving to a yearly release schedule like Windows Phone. It's not difficult to imagine what an achievement that is for an organization as ginormous as WinDiv.

Here's what I expect (or hope) from Blue:

- Let me snap Windows 50/50
- Let me pin Metro apps to the Desktop Taskbar
- Implement IPC in a sensible way, and a JIT API so that 3rd party browsers can run on Windows RT.
- Flesh out the XAML stack. Feature parity with SL5 at least in the data binding department
- Unified Search View
- Implement Cloud Compiling of apps to reduce load times to nearly zero. WP8 does this to great effect.
- Allow Desktop Apps to use more of the WinRT Framework, make them more visible in the Store.
- Streamline the entire App submission/approval process, make it better, faster, etc.
- Support 7-8 inch tablets, portrait interfaces.

Reply Score: 3

RE: Comment by Stephen!
by aargh on Mon 25th Feb 2013 07:43 UTC in reply to "Comment by Stephen!"
aargh Member since:
2009-10-12

But will it blend?

Reply Score: 4

Blue?
by phti on Sun 24th Feb 2013 19:40 UTC
phti
Member since:
2012-06-02

Nice name, just like the color of its users' most appreciated screen...

Reply Score: 6

Wish/Fix list for Windows 9
by chekr on Mon 25th Feb 2013 06:42 UTC
chekr
Member since:
2005-11-05

1 - Snap between two metro applications should not have a locked ratio (80/20), a user should be able to use 50/50, 60/40 or whatever they like.

2 - By default no start menu, but can be enabled in registry

3 - Allow metro apps to be opened within a window in the classic shell

4 - Allow plugins in Metro IE (I miss lastpass badly)

5 - Uncripple the email client

6 - MS Office as a metro application

7 - Oh and they are Metro apps, not windows store apps...license the trademark or get a better name

Reply Score: 3

search "improvements"
by Lion on Mon 25th Feb 2013 08:09 UTC
Lion
Member since:
2007-03-22

As long as they don't pull a Windows Phone 7 and make the search charm take me to bing, I'll be happy.
Worst change they've made to that OS IMO

Reply Score: 2

RE: search "improvements"
by Nelson on Mon 25th Feb 2013 08:52 UTC in reply to "search "improvements""
Nelson Member since:
2005-11-29

The Charms Bar solves the problem of contextual search on Windows Phone.

Contextual search on WP7 didn't work out because

a) Almost no one implemented it, there was no uniform interface to adhere to or any kind of implementation support like there is on Windows 8
b) Everyone implemented it differently.

Pressing the Search button on WP7 MIGHT take you to in-app search or MIGHT take you to Bing.

What if I was in an app with contextual search and wanted to actually go to Bing? I couldn't. I had to exit the app (which on WP7.0 meant slow tombstoning).

I think Windows Blue is more along the lines of adding a single unified search pane in addition to the currently displayed results.

Reply Score: 3

RE[2]: search "improvements"
by Lion on Tue 26th Feb 2013 22:00 UTC in reply to "RE: search "improvements""
Lion Member since:
2007-03-22

I think that on my HD7, the number of times I have intentionally hit the bing button can be counted on one hand (Bing is a lot less useful if you aren't in the USA or UK) but the number of times I accidentally launched it and had to wait for it to exit so I could get back to my app number in the high hundreds. This was exacerbated by the ease with which a capacitive button can be accidentally pressed.
Unpredictable behaviour that sometimes gave me a useful behaviour (in-app search) and sometimes did nothing at all was preferable to that. (I never encountered it taking me to bing back then)
Rather than the bing behaviour, I and many of my coworkers would have preferred that the search button be completely and permanently disabled.

Edited 2013-02-26 22:01 UTC

Reply Score: 2

Settings
by Temcat on Mon 25th Feb 2013 09:37 UTC
Temcat
Member since:
2005-10-18

I heard the settings are scattered between the Desktop and Metro parts in Win 8. I wonder if they are going to sort this out.

Reply Score: 2

RE: Settings
by nej_simon on Mon 25th Feb 2013 14:01 UTC in reply to "Settings"
nej_simon Member since:
2011-02-11

A guess is that they'll just remove the desktop eventually.

Reply Score: 2

Network stack
by Tuishimi on Mon 25th Feb 2013 18:59 UTC
Tuishimi
Member since:
2005-07-06

Hopefully they fix the disconnect between metro networking and desktop networking.

It's a pain to lose connectivity in my Metro apps whenever I VPN into work. I have to fire up outlook or thunderbird to see my mail/calendar. (not a big deal I know, but other apps die as well, weather, news, etc.)

Reply Score: 2

Comment by shmerl
by shmerl on Tue 26th Feb 2013 00:48 UTC
shmerl
Member since:
2010-06-08

Windows Blue? Sounds like a bad name, given the BSOD association.

Reply Score: 1