Linked by Thom Holwerda on Tue 5th Mar 2013 23:41 UTC, submitted by Nth_Man
Ubuntu, Kubuntu, Xubuntu "HP, the worlds biggest PC vendor as of 2012, has today launched a brand new all-in-one PC running Ubuntu. But the real 'wow' factor comes from its pricing. At just GBP 349 HP have pitched the PC well within the reach of your average consumer. A similar, though not identical, model is also available with Windows 8 priced at GBP 499."
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v Comment by themwagency
by themwagency on Wed 6th Mar 2013 01:53 UTC
RE: Comment by themwagency
by Morgan on Wed 6th Mar 2013 02:37 UTC in reply to "Comment by themwagency"
Morgan Member since:
2005-06-29

If the article spoke of HP releasing a new smartphone or tablet, your sources would make sense. But it doesn't.

What I do find interesting is that Lenovo was number two in 2012, just under HP at number one. Considering Dell's long standing foothold in the corporate and government arenas, that's quite an accomplishment.


My (relevant and reliable) source:
http://www.gartner.com/newsroom/id/2301715

Reply Score: 9

v RE[2]: Comment by themwagency
by themwagency on Wed 6th Mar 2013 04:12 UTC in reply to "RE: Comment by themwagency"
RE[3]: Comment by themwagency
by Morgan on Wed 6th Mar 2013 04:33 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Comment by themwagency"
Morgan Member since:
2005-06-29

You didn't even glance at the article I linked, did you? I'll quote the relevant bit:

Note: Data includes desk-based PCs and mobile PCs, including mini-notebooks but not media tablets such as the iPad. Data is based on the shipments selling into channels.


In other words, the Gartner report is based purely on desktops and laptops. Not servers, not thin clients, not tablets as your horribly skewed stats did.

To put it in a way you might be able to grasp: You can't throw out statistics with tablets and phones to try to "balance out" what you assume to be statistics that include servers and thin clients but actually don't. Try doing some actual research before making wild assumptions and grabbing wilder statistics to try to make a point that doesn't even need to be made.

It took me all of thirty seconds to find that Gartner report, probably less time by far than you took to find your flawed and pointless stats.

Reply Score: 9

RE[2]: Comment by themwagency
by REM2000 on Wed 6th Mar 2013 14:27 UTC in reply to "RE: Comment by themwagency"
REM2000 Member since:
2006-07-25

i know it's off topic but i can understand it, your 100% right it sounds weird as you would expect Dell and HP to dominate.

Lenovo makesgreat kit, i love their hardware.

Reply Score: 2

For a desktop system
by Kivada on Wed 6th Mar 2013 03:11 UTC
Kivada
Member since:
2010-07-07

The specs are pretty damn anemic. An E2-1200? Really? A netbook CPU in a desktop?

If you are going to ripoff the iMac you may as well try and compete with it. Give it at least a 1920x1080 screen, a quad or octo core AMD CPU and an option for either the HD7970m or GTX680MX MXM GPUs so you can still have good gaming capability in side of the space and heat constraints of an all in one.

For the money I'm sure I can beat this thing with an off the shelf ITX system that I can strap to the back of any screen with a VESA mount.

Reply Score: 2

RE: For a desktop system
by Morgan on Wed 6th Mar 2013 04:25 UTC in reply to "For a desktop system"
Morgan Member since:
2005-06-29

For the money I'm sure I can beat this thing with an off the shelf ITX system that I can strap to the back of any screen with a VESA mount.


Apart from aesthetics, you're pretty much spot on. I wonder if someone will come out with an Intel NUC based solution similar to this? That board would fit inside many cheaper model LCD monitors.

Reply Score: 2

RE: For a desktop system
by BushLin on Wed 6th Mar 2013 17:30 UTC in reply to "For a desktop system"
BushLin Member since:
2011-01-26

What you just described would probably be three times the price.

This is a budget system, made cheaper by tossing out the windows licence. It's not aimed at gamers.

Reply Score: 6

RE[2]: For a desktop system
by Kivada on Thu 7th Mar 2013 05:39 UTC in reply to "RE: For a desktop system"
Kivada Member since:
2010-07-07

Neither is the iMac, but there is no excuse for putting a netbook class CPU in a desktop box.

I'm saying is that there is a void in the market, and nobody is willing to fill it as everyone wants to use the most bare ass minimum hardware available and call it a day creating machines that are likely to be slower then what most people already have.

The E2-1200 is too slow for 1080p video and will likely struggle with high bitrate 720p unless they included a Broadcom CrystalHD BCM70015 in there to offload it since you don't have proper video acceleration yet with AMD GPUs and likely wont until at least the HD8000 drops as they claimed some time back that they where working on redoing the way the video acceleration was implemented so that they could allow for them to have something like VA-API or VDPAU to actually work.

Couple that with a GPU thats barely passable for only about half of the currently available games just wreaks of a terrible user experience and thus poor sales.

Reply Score: 0

RE[3]: For a desktop system
by BushLin on Thu 7th Mar 2013 09:30 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: For a desktop system"
BushLin Member since:
2011-01-26

Chill out, the GPU is more than capable of 1080p video, a cheap ass card from years ago can accelerate h.264 at high bitrate and resolution.

I'm sorry this isn't a PC for you, I wouldn't buy one either but complaining it won't play games properly is missing the point. This is a cheap machine for big screen browsing and e-mail, that's all most people need. Looks good value to me for all the features you get if you'd look past the clock rates and GPU grunt.

Keep in perspective that AMD have a 28nm replacement for this chip in the coming months (Kabini) that's a complete low power SoC, I'm sure HP are getting the current chips for a steal and will have something to follow this up with (rather than just adding further features to an E-350).

I'm not saying that it won't be a failure, maybe they'll not properly set up acceleration or Ubuntu will push out updates which break important things but if won't fail for the reasons you state.

Reply Score: 4

RE[4]: For a desktop system
by Kivada on Fri 8th Mar 2013 06:50 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: For a desktop system"
Kivada Member since:
2010-07-07

OK, so what combo of kernel, X.org and drivers allows XvBA to run? Have I missed something when it comes to AMD's drivers?

Because last I checked while the hardware is more then capable of it the drivers on Linux still don't have the ability to make use of the GPU's video codec offloading capabilities. Else every video you play is going to have to be played on THE CPU, which this particular model is not exactly up to the task of doing since it's meant to be in a 9"-12.1" laptop.

Hence why I said you'd need a CrystalHD chip to make this thing a passable system for modern content.

Reply Score: 1

RE[5]: For a desktop system
by BushLin on Fri 8th Mar 2013 09:29 UTC in reply to "RE[4]: For a desktop system"
BushLin Member since:
2011-01-26

I didn't come here for an argument, things have probably changed since you last checked.

https://launchpad.net/~wsnipex/+archive/xbmc-xvba

Hardware H.264 decoding in XBMC is fine with the propitiatory driver; to be fair, hardware MPEG-2 isn't complete yet but that isn't something the CPU will have trouble with.

Instead of an unnecessary chip replicating hardware functions already present, it'd surely be better to have the masses create a bigger demand for the finishing touches in areas like this.

Reply Score: 2

Comment by v_bobok
by v_bobok on Wed 6th Mar 2013 05:03 UTC
v_bobok
Member since:
2008-08-01

Ew, Ubuntu is getting too mainstream, quick let's all get into Haiku ;)

Reply Score: 12

RE: Comment by v_bobok
by Wafflez on Wed 6th Mar 2013 06:47 UTC in reply to "Comment by v_bobok"
Wafflez Member since:
2011-06-26

I think it's FreeBSD's turn.

Reply Score: 5

RE: Comment by v_bobok
by Damnshock on Wed 6th Mar 2013 10:00 UTC in reply to "Comment by v_bobok"
Damnshock Member since:
2006-09-15

I actually think that it would be good for all linux users if one distribution went mainstream.

The only problem (and a big one) is that Ubuntu seems to be forgetting where they come from and are shooting themselves in their own foot.

Reply Score: 2

RE[2]: Comment by v_bobok
by r_a_trip on Wed 6th Mar 2013 11:08 UTC in reply to "RE: Comment by v_bobok"
r_a_trip Member since:
2005-07-06

Well, the latter might be caused by your former.

Ubuntu is going mainstream and lo and behold, they forget where they came from and shoot themselves in the foot.

Or rephrased, stop being a traditional Linux distribution in the GNU/Linux sense and shift more and more to an Android model.

Reply Score: 3

RE[2]: Comment by v_bobok
by backdoc on Wed 6th Mar 2013 15:29 UTC in reply to "RE: Comment by v_bobok"
backdoc Member since:
2006-01-14

I don't think they are forgetting where they came from. They have been planning to be mainstream from day one. It's just that now that they are realizing some of their goals, the Linux crowd thinks they are selling out.

I can recall year after year Linux people cheering this is the "year of the desktop". In order to accomplish that, you have appeal to the wider audience. You can't just appeal to nerds. Now that Ubuntu seems to be making good strides getting main stream, those same nerds are shouting, "sellouts".

I've been using Linux for about 15 years. I love Linux. I want to see it succeed everywhere (mobile, desktop, server and so on). And, I think that Ubuntu is making all of the right moves to see that happen.

So, for the nerds screaming "sellout", let me ask you this, "What can you NOT do with Ubuntu?" If you tell me you don't like the direction or defaults, I'm just going to laugh at you.

Reply Score: 5

RE[3]: Comment by v_bobok
by Bill Shooter of Bul on Wed 6th Mar 2013 18:01 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Comment by v_bobok"
Bill Shooter of Bul Member since:
2006-07-14

I think the "forgetting where they came from" might be directed at the whole mir display server thing.

That reeks of NIH syndrome. Ubuntu tried bashing Wayland to explain the decision, but had to reverse course when wayland devs spoke up.

Ubuntu just scored as being the prototypical linux distro with steam, but with mir Steam will end up kind of forking it, if they use it at all. Bullet meet foot.

They had Unity 2D written in QT, then dropped it leaving Unity in GTK only. Then decided to rewrite it for Mobile in QT. Now they are standardizing unity on all form factors in QT.

It kind of looks like they don't have as much technical vision as they like to pretend.

Reply Score: 2

Options are always nice.
by tkeith on Wed 6th Mar 2013 11:12 UTC
tkeith
Member since:
2010-09-01

I'm thoroughly convinced that some people are never happy. The thought that big names like HP and Dell would be putting out Linux boxes would have been unheard of just a few years ago. If you truly want the end of Windows dominance you have to support the change. Just because Ubuntu is starting to use other "non-standard" components in their software stack doesn't mean they aren't open source and beneficial to the community.

About 4 years ago Dell came out with their mini 9 with Ubuntu and I put my money where my mouth is and bought one specifically with Ubuntu. Now the hardware durability and software support were not world class, but I hopefully helped show that there is a market for non-windows PCs. If I needed a new desktop I would seriously consider this.

Reply Score: 4

RE: Options are always nice.
by REM2000 on Wed 6th Mar 2013 14:36 UTC in reply to "Options are always nice."
REM2000 Member since:
2006-07-25

i agree i think the good thing is that a company like HP who isn't doing that well int the hardware / desktop biz is putting out a Linux machine. I think that the large amount of RAM will offset the processor, obviously this is an internet type terminal, facebook and stuff should be ok on it.

Reply Score: 4

RE: Options are always nice.
by backdoc on Wed 6th Mar 2013 15:33 UTC in reply to "Options are always nice."
backdoc Member since:
2006-01-14

I agree completely. I hadn't seen your reply when I wrote mine (http://www.osnews.com/permalink?554348).

Reply Score: 2

Wrong audience
by unoengborg on Wed 6th Mar 2013 12:47 UTC
unoengborg
Member since:
2005-07-06

Nice, but I think they target the wrong audience.

People that run Linux want advanced fast hardware. This will end up in the hands of people with little knowledge that doesn't know what an OS is, and even less the difference between Windows and Linux.
The result will be dissatisfied customers and high return rate and HP will get to the conclusion that people doesn't like or buy Linux.

To succeed thy need more high end stuff, and they need to make sure that every component in their offering have open source drivers.

Reply Score: 5

RE: Wrong audience
by BushLin on Wed 6th Mar 2013 20:46 UTC in reply to "Wrong audience"
BushLin Member since:
2011-01-26

I think you're right, this isn't aimed at people who already run Linux. This is aimed at being the lowest possible cost iMac-a-like that Joe Bloggs might pick up at Tesco while doing the weekly shop.

HP are gambling that typical user needs (i.e. not people who read OS news) can be met with Ubuntu; Win8 has probably helped their decision since they'll probably get just as big a proportion of angry calls about the user interface from those sales.

Surely a bigger userbase is a good thing for Linux... isn't it?
Noooo... we'll get GUI instead of an arbitrarily located text files and n00bs infesting the forums ;)

Reply Score: 2

Link?
by jessesmith on Wed 6th Mar 2013 12:48 UTC
jessesmith
Member since:
2010-03-11

The article mentions the machine running Windows and links to the Windows version of the product. The link for the version of the product running Linux is way down at the bottom of the page. The direct link is: http://h20386.www2.hp.com/UKStore/Merch/Product.aspx?id=ECC_BUNDLE_...

Edited 2013-03-06 12:49 UTC

Reply Score: 6

Worthy Competitor
by benali72 on Fri 8th Mar 2013 00:01 UTC
benali72
Member since:
2008-05-03

Thanks for the link, Thom.

Interesting to see that the savings over the Windows version is a full 150 pounds. In the U.S. when you buy Linux they usually just within $50 of the Windows version (because of Microsoft's OEM licensing agreements), thereby making it hardly worth the savings to buy Linux.

Reply Score: 3