Linked by Thom Holwerda on Wed 13th Mar 2013 17:58 UTC
Google Andy Rubin, who created Android and has led its development both at Android Inc. and later at Google, has decided to step down as the big Android boss at Google. Having created the world's "most-used mobile operating system", as Google CEO Larry Page refers to it, I'd say his stint has been successful. Interestingly enough, he will be succeeded by Sundar Pichai - Chrome OS boss. Yes.
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ronaldst
Member since:
2005-06-29

à la Firefox OS.

Now if only Microsoft would get the hint to invest more into Internet Explorer. Live Tile notification support is nice but we need more web integration (Web activities, etc...))

Reply Score: 2

manjabes Member since:
2005-08-27

slightly offtopic, but:
What mobile IE needs is not support for yet another emerging "web standard" but for the architects and developers to f....ing dogfood it for a month. No PCs, no tablets, no nothing, just mobile IE. Then we'd have SOME hope that the utter pile of cow dung that is mobile IE usability wise gets any better.

I apologize if my comment carries a slight bitter scent but that's how it is. Purchased a Win8 phone recently and due to all the glowing reviews (the best IE yet, all standards support and mega-awesomeness) expected something nice, but got a steaming pile of manure that cannot hold more than 6 tabs open at once (on a device with a friggin' gigabyte of memory!!), cannot fit a webpage on a screen so that one shouldn't scroll oneself to madness while trying to read a webpage, that can't open tabs in the background etc.

There's NO way on Gods green earth that the developers have used that browser more than just to show off for a couple of minutes on a trade show (just as I was fooled for a few minutes when trying it in the store).

dixi et animam levavi

Edited 2013-03-13 19:16 UTC

Reply Score: 4

pandronic Member since:
2006-05-18

I'm using a HTC 8S (not a high end device by any means) and I'm really pleased with IE10. It's really speedy and renders everything quite well. I give you that you should be able to open tabs in the background, but that's just a minor annoyance.

Edit: Thinking about it, IE might just be one of the few Windows Phone 8 apps that doesn't suck.

Edited 2013-03-15 07:18 UTC

Reply Score: 3

Comment by Sodki
by Sodki on Wed 13th Mar 2013 18:40 UTC
Sodki
Member since:
2005-11-10

I always liked to hear Sundar Pichai's talks. Let's see where this is headed, by so far I'm optimistic. Even if you are not an Android fan, you can't argue about the benefits it has brought to the mobile industry as an open platform.

I'll still cling to my N900, though. :-)

Reply Score: 6

v Larry Page's announcement decoded.
by Tony Swash on Wed 13th Mar 2013 18:48 UTC
moondevil Member since:
2005-07-08

I am still wondering if Google eventually transitions from Java based environment to something else as result from the issues with Oracle.

Maybe this will be part of such transition.

Reply Score: 5

butters Member since:
2005-07-08

I hope so, as long as the "something else" isn't Dart/GWT.

Reply Score: 3

moondevil Member since:
2005-07-08

Dart for native applications would be quite nice, a kind of Smalltalk feel to native applications.

Now for GWT I fully agree with you.

As for Go, although I did create an issue for NDK support, I hope it does not become the main language, unless they get around adding generics.

Edited 2013-03-13 21:32 UTC

Reply Score: 3

butters Member since:
2005-07-08

Why generics? Go has interface types for polymorphism.

Personally, for client-side GUI development I'd prefer something more along the lines of Python or Ruby. Or Moonscript! In a perfect world, provide a LuaJIT runtime for compilers to target, providing a more flexible platform like JVM or CLR.

Edited 2013-03-13 21:58 UTC

Reply Score: 2

moondevil Member since:
2005-07-08

Why generics? Go has interface types for polymorphism.


Performance and avoidance of type casts everywhere in what is supposed to be generic code.

Go mailing list has almost a new thread every day about these type of issues.

Personally, for client-side GUI development I'd prefer something more along the lines of Python or Ruby. Or Moonscript! In a perfect world, provide a LuaJIT runtime for compilers to target, providing a more flexible platform like JVM or CLR.


I prefer languages that allow for a combination of AOT compilation for distribution and a JIT for development time.

Sadly there aren't many with such type of implementation available in the mainstream.

Reply Score: 5

Nelson Member since:
2005-11-29

Google would solve its issues if it went with Mono and their excellent Android bindings.

It ticks off every check box. (And as an added bonus, ticks off some fanatics out there, which obviously makes me happy)

Reply Score: 3

darknexus Member since:
2008-07-15

Google would solve its issues if it went with Mono and their excellent Android bindings.

Not really. Between Microsoft and Oracle, I'm not sure who I'd rather have after me.

Edited 2013-03-14 04:22 UTC

Reply Score: 3

JAlexoid Member since:
2009-05-19

Why are you feeding the troll? Not even inventive...

Reply Score: 2

Tony Swash Member since:
2009-08-22

What this means for Android is covered in this interesting article

http://blogs.computerworld.com/android/21906/andy-rubin-android

As the author correctly notes it's not just Rubin's departure that is a surprise.

"Rubin stepping down at all is a surprise: The now-well-known robot enthusiast co-founded Android as a small startup back in 2003 and has overseen its development ever since. He's remained the proud papa of the platform from day one, heading up its development at Google (which bought the startup in 2005) and earning the title of "senior vice president of mobile and digital content."

Even more eyebrow-raising, though, is the nature of Rubin's replacement. Sundar Pichai already heads up development of both Chrome and Chrome OS as well as a number of apps, including Gmail and Google Calendar -- and, perhaps most significant, will continue overseeing those projects while taking on his new Android-oriented responsibilities.

Chrome OS and Android, together at last?

Oh, hello, giant elephant in the room."

Reply Score: 1

BallmerKnowsBest Member since:
2008-06-02

Hey Tony, ArsTechnica posted this story too, are you going to spam them with the exact same comment? Or are you just going to stick to OSNews and DailyTech?

http://www.dailytech.com/article.aspx?newsid=30119&commentid=845577...

Reply Score: 4

JAlexoid Member since:
2009-05-19

I hope you are aware what a blind Apple fanboi that annoying person is...

Reply Score: 2

Bit_Rapist Member since:
2005-11-13

So we stole a lot of code from Sun which luckily had a management about to throw in the towel and and who didn't have a clue what we were up to.


Google did not steal a darn thing from Sun or Oracle.

Sun open sourced Java! The original argument about a license was for a license to use the Java(tm) logo which google never needed because they don't advertise Android as being Java. I've never seen a java logo on an Android phone or in the OS.

Oracle tried to change the rules after the fact when they sued Google over Java APIs.

What Oracle tried to pull would be like AT&T suing Apple and any other company that used BSD Unix for not having a license for various Unix APIs even though they are following the BSD License.

It was a joke and Oracle deserved to lose.

the only people I've ever met who think Oracle had a valid claim are clueless Apple fans who don't even understand the fscking industry and the damage an Oracle win would have done.

Piss off.

Edited 2013-03-15 18:56 UTC

Reply Score: 3

Chome OS needs to do something
by FunkyELF on Wed 13th Mar 2013 18:53 UTC
FunkyELF
Member since:
2006-07-26

My wife got 5 ChromeBooks (Samsung Series 5) for her classroom through the Donors Choose program. They were only $99 through there.

Anyway, she got them last week and we were using them trying to figure out what all they can do. They can basically do anything that Chrome can do, which isn't much.

The Chrome Web store is rife with "applications" that are essentially bookmarks to urls of Flash web pages covered with Flash advertisements.

I was extremely disappointed with them.
For her classroom it will be fine, but if it were my money, (they're $250 retail), I'd spend a hundred more dollars and get something with a real operating system.

As far as their applications go... I'm not sure NaCl, or even PNaCl is the way to go. Web applications involve too much. CSS, HTML, JavaScript, Server-side code in yet another language.

Ultimately I know that web applications are the most portable across systems since every system has a web browser... I just wish JS wasn't the standard. I wish LLVM bitcode was the standard and you could code in JS, Python, C, or whatever else your heard desired. PNaCl will be a step towards this but it is still too restrictive and not a standard used by anybody but Chrome.

Reply Score: 4

RE: Chome OS needs to do something
by moondevil on Wed 13th Mar 2013 18:57 UTC in reply to "Chome OS needs to do something"
moondevil Member since:
2005-07-08

My netbook had a price tag of 300€ and has a full blown operating system running on it with a dual core AMD Brazos APU and a proper graphics card thanks to it.

No way I would replace this for a dumb wannabe laptop.

Reply Score: 2

Lennie Member since:
2007-09-22

Actually it has the fastest ARM processor available for end user market. And has no moving parts, so no fans, no HDD.

I installed desktop Linux on it.

Operating systems are free to download and install remember ? ;-)

Reply Score: 3

moondevil Member since:
2005-07-08

Actually it has the fastest ARM processor available for end user market. And has no moving parts, so no fans, no HDD.


And the graphics card is a joke, a no no for me.

I installed desktop Linux on it.

Operating systems are free to download and install remember ? ;-)


If I don't want to use a system with the OS it is being sold, why bother to give the company any money?

Reply Score: 2

Lennie Member since:
2007-09-22

I'm paying for the hardware of course, it is more than cheap enough that I doubt that anyone is making any money on the OS of a Chromebook.

Reply Score: 2

RE: Chome OS needs to do something
by tkeith on Wed 13th Mar 2013 19:06 UTC in reply to "Chome OS needs to do something"
tkeith Member since:
2010-09-01

My Son's school just ordered a bunch of chromebooks. Most of what they do is through the web anyway. You still have to pay for a good content provider, it's not like you're going to find a lot of free, quality educational sites out there. I'd much rather see them pay $100-200 on a low maintenance Chromebook than $1000+ on iMAC's like many schools. Now if only schools would realize the iPAD isn't the only tablet out there.

I agree about the Web store, Google needs to clean that up badly. It's embarrassing.

Reply Score: 6

darknexus Member since:
2008-07-15

Now if only schools would realize the iPAD isn't the only tablet out there.

Depending on regulations in the country, region, or district, the iPad might very well be the only one they can go for right now. I don't know of any regulations that specify iPads but, in many areas, they do specify certain minimum requirements for educational use. Occasionally those requirements include certain accessibility features (differs by area) for those with vision, motor, or auditory problems. These are all things the iPad (and iOS in general) have where Android's situation is far murkier and the fragmentation issues impede the use of some or all of these functions. Even in areas where these regulations are not present, iPads are far easier to deploy sight wide than something like an Android tablet, and there is the frequency (or lack there of depending on the OEM) of updates and security patches to consider as well.

Reply Score: 4

RE: Chome OS needs to do something
by fatjoe on Wed 13th Mar 2013 19:16 UTC in reply to "Chome OS needs to do something"
fatjoe Member since:
2010-01-12

Let me see if I get this correct...

1. Schools are spending shitloads of $$$ on manpower and software to lock down expensive laptops so students don't fill them with games, viruses and spyware.

2. Google gives them very some very low maintenance hardware with excellent security at a extremely good price. Schools are now happy like a dyke in a hardware store.

3. You are a leet wizard who can't use this for your leet wizardy projects, therefore ChromeOS is a failure?

Your leet wizardy skillz for some reason doesn't include making google searches? There are tons of articles about dualbooting chromebooks or running full linux in a chroot environment..

Edited 2013-03-13 19:19 UTC

Reply Score: 11

chithanh Member since:
2006-06-18

I agree.

The value in being maintenance-free is something that many computer enthusiasts and also some tech journalists have difficulties to grasp.

Reply Score: 5

FunkyELF Member since:
2006-07-26

So you're agreeing with me...
Thanks?

I said it would be fine for her classroom.
I said it was not for me and I'd go with something else.

Are you surprised that someone on OSNews would demand more from an operating system?

I never said Chrome OS was a failure, don't put words in my mouth or infer things.
I said what I said, nothing more.

They're good for children, and worth every penny if you value security and being locked down.
They're bad for people with actual computing needs, and overpriced if you're going to replace ChromeOS with something else.

The picture editor only has "rotate" and "crop"... it didn't even have red eye reduction. You can't even Facebook properly on it.

I did not dual boot the machines because they're not mine and I didn't want to brick them. To dual boot you need to get into dev mode and replace the bootloader.
I did, however, do the chroot thing which only required dev mode, not replacing the bootloader.
The chroot environment was okay but still had issues due to the hardware. There was no middle clicking to paste and the alt-up alt-down as home and end keys that works in ChromeOS did not translate to the chroot environment.

Reply Score: 2

ChromeOS
by judgen on Wed 13th Mar 2013 19:28 UTC
judgen
Member since:
2006-07-12

I met some dude at the airport yesterday that uses ChomeOS as his only computer OS. I found it hard to believe, but is this where we are heading?

Reply Score: 2

Most used mobile operating system???
by themwagency on Wed 13th Mar 2013 23:13 UTC
themwagency
Member since:
2013-03-06

There has always been a lot of misrepresentation on the interwebs about which is the most used mobile operating system because Andoid's mobile phone operating system share is bigger than iOS's mobile phone operating system share.

But as we all know, mobile phone OSes do not equal mobile OSes.

Andy Rubin is making a false statement when he trots out the most-used reference. This holds true not only for market share that references sales but also in every single statistic I've seen that references web tracking code.

From DF:

They do show that iPhone sales are continuing to grow at a pretty fast clip year over year, but that second sentence rankles. It creates the perception that iOS was previously “the most widely used smartphone operating system worldwide”. I don’t believe that was ever the case.

Take a look at this chart from Wikipedia, based on numbers from Gartner. Just talking about operating systems, it’s clear that the OS that Android “leapfrogged” to become the most-used in the world is Symbian. iOS has never even been close to being the market share leader for smartphones. Look at this chart from Horace Dediu showing handset sale numbers and you get an even starker picture of how “market share” isn’t a relevant measure of the iPhone’s success or position in the market, at any point over the last five years.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:World_Wide_Smartphone_Sales_Share...
http://www.asymco.com/2012/11/14/google-vs-samsung/

Edited 2013-03-13 23:31 UTC

Reply Score: 2

BiPolar Member since:
2007-07-06

Please take into account that other parts of the world exist beyond the US.

The last, and only Apple computer I saw in my country was 15 years ago.

*Some* people have iPads and iPhones over here (so I was told, never seen it personally). Believe me, iOS market share is nearly non-existent down here (its Android all over it).

Reply Score: 3

themwagency Member since:
2013-03-06

Please take into account that other parts of the world exist beyond the US.


Of course. iOS is larger by a significant margin than any mobile operating system... including android.

The last, and only Apple computer I saw in my country was 15 years ago.


I'm not talking about an Apple computer. Why are you bringing this up?

*Some* people have iPads and iPhones over here (so I was told, never seen it personally). Believe me, iOS market share is nearly non-existent down here (its Android all over it).


Im not talking anecdotal evidence as you did. I'm talking both market share and usage share... worldwide. iOS is larger than any other mobile operating system.

http://news.cnet.com/8301-13579_3-57556846-37/ios-android-and-web-t...

Edited 2013-03-14 02:18 UTC

Reply Score: 1

JAlexoid Member since:
2009-05-19

iOS isn't larger by any measure. It's used more to browse websites.

And just like claiming that iOS devices should be counted as PCs, you are making a statement full of deceit.

Reply Score: 2

krreagan Member since:
2008-04-08

It just goes to show you... People buy an Android device to have a smart phone, People buy an iOS device to use a smart phone.

Considering the disparity in #'s alone. the fact that iOS has such a commanding lead in on-line usage is embarrassing to Android. it means the average person who buys an android does not use it on line! Probably because they are intimidated. While people buy an iOS device because it ... wait-for-it...."JUST WORKS!" ;)

As an OSS user for coming up on 20 years now, I'm really disappointed in the Android ecosystem.

KRR

Reply Score: 0

l3v1 Member since:
2005-07-06

it means the average person who buys an android does not use it on line! Probably because they are intimidated.


Crazy stuff you put down there in writing ;) I've had Android phones for more than 2 years now, and there's been only a couple of times that I used them "on line!" as you put it, and by that you probably mean some mobile data connection. I used them plenty over wifi, but very seldomly for browsing. I always had a light laptop for doing that (now I used an xps13 for that).

Why not using more the phones' data plans? Because they are crazy expensive! Especially so if I'd happen to cross borders, which I do quite often.

Intimidated my a**. They just might be a bit over their early teens, have something more to do besides browsing on their mobile devices, or just figured out that those things can be used for more than browsing. So, every stat builder should just stick their mobile browser stats where they want, because there are quite a number of people out there, who do not believe that the number of people browsing from iOS means something.

Reply Score: 3

JAlexoid Member since:
2009-05-19

I'm sorry, then why do my clients(mobile tel.co's) complain that Android is taking up too much of their mobile traffic?(Interestingly enough, HTML over HTTP isn't the dominant traffic for Android users)

This latest piece of news only supports what I saw over the last year, monitoring mobile networks in different countries around the world.

http://www.forbes.com/sites/terokuittinen/2013/02/27/android-smartp...

Reply Score: 3

themwagency Member since:
2013-03-06

iOS isn't larger by any measure. It's used more to browse websites.


I provided evidence showing as much. What have you provided?

And just like claiming that iOS devices should be counted as PCs, you are making a statement full of deceit.


I made no such comment (in this thread)

Reply Score: 1

JAlexoid Member since:
2009-05-19

I provided evidence showing as much. What have you provided?

You gave an example where Android users browse the web less - I concur with that.

Then you made a false claim based on data that is no way representative of your statement.

IDC and Gartner say that Android is bigger. Google says that Android is bigger(over 750mil devices activated to date, compared to 550 mil iOS devices).
Android has a larger install base. Android has a larger market share(We're talking global here).
All corroborated by numerous independent sources.

I made no such comment (in this thread)

That was an example of a deceitful statement, I was not even attributing that to you.

Reply Score: 3

not true!
by sergio on Thu 14th Mar 2013 06:20 UTC in reply to "RE: Most used mobile operating system???"
sergio Member since:
2005-07-06

There are plenty of iPads and iPhones down here, iOS is more popular than ever.

Yeah, Android rules the cheap phone market but Apple owns the high end market. I think that happens everywhere.

Regarding your Mac bashing comments, I'm posting this with a Mac and there are lots of Mac users (much more than 15 years ago that's for sure). But It's the same story... low end market is ruled by PCs but the high end +$1000 market is 100% Macbook.

Reply Score: 2

RE: not true!
by JAlexoid on Thu 14th Mar 2013 11:20 UTC in reply to "not true!"
JAlexoid Member since:
2009-05-19

Since my T430s is well into the over $2000 category, that "high end +$1000 market is 100% Macbook" statement is pulled out of your a**.

Reply Score: 4

Soulbender Member since:
2005-08-18

There has always been a lot of misrepresentation on the interwebs about which is the most used mobile operating system because Andoid's mobile phone operating system share is bigger than iOS's mobile phone operating system share.


Uh, that's pretty much the definition of more used.
More users == more use.
Or are you saying people buy these phones, keep them in their boxes and never use them?

This holds true not only for market share that references sales but also in every single statistic I've seen that references web tracking code.


Web tracking code says zero about mobile OS use, it only says something about mobile OS web browsing.

Reply Score: 2

puenktchen Member since:
2007-07-27

Web tracking code says zero about mobile OS use, it only says something about mobile OS web browsing.


And because web browsing is the dominant use case of smart phones, it does say something about the use as smart phone OS. I think that android did take over a big share of the market for feature phones with a flexible operating system from Symbian. Theoretically all those mid range Nokia phones could be used to browse the web, install apps etc. but in reality most were used as nice phones. This might also be the case with many cheaper android phones. If this assumption is correct it would mean that Android OS is used on more phones than iOS, but not as smart phone platform but as phone platform.

Just a guess, but the difference between sold phones and web stats must mean something.

edit - but android is still by far the most used mobile os: http://gs.statcounter.com/#mobile_os-ww-monthly-200902-201302

edit 2 - Not counting tablets. But sitting on your couch isn't very mobile.

Edited 2013-03-14 10:47 UTC

Reply Score: 3

I wouldn't read too much into it.
by Nelson on Thu 14th Mar 2013 02:34 UTC
Nelson
Member since:
2005-11-29

Andy Rubin likely just felt it was his time to move on, hell, he could be doing something super secret and forward facing within Google beyond Android and completely unrelated to anything currently announced or speculated. This kind of reorganization is common place.

Look for example when Microsoft moved Scott Gu to Windows Azure (and how he completely turned that division around) or when they moved Anders from C# to working on making JS productive and they came out with TypeScript. The big brains in the company are routinely dispatched once the product is mature enough.

The fact that the ChromeOS guy is now in charge was probably a good coincidence for Google. They saw an opportunity to move towards more alignment which can only be good for Android and ChromeOS.

Here's to the future.

Reply Score: 3