Linked by Thom Holwerda on Fri 5th Apr 2013 21:16 UTC
Hardware, Embedded Systems AlienWare (so Dell) has just unveiled a gaming PC running Ubuntu and Steam, designed to be hooked up to a TV - essentially a Steambox. "With over 25 gaming titles available and more being added, users can access Steam For Linux to play online games, including your favorite titles like Team Fortress 2 and Serious Sam 3." Everything starts out small, but with Valve going full throttle with this, expect this library to grow.
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by Hiev on Fri 5th Apr 2013 21:23 UTC
Hiev
Member since:
2005-09-27

Go Ubuntu!

Reply Score: 3

f**king bulls**t
by TechGeek on Fri 5th Apr 2013 22:07 UTC
TechGeek
Member since:
2006-01-14

When you go to build yours, the first thing you see is an offer for a xps 10 Windows RT tablet. What a load of crap.

Edited 2013-04-05 22:07 UTC

Reply Score: 0

More like 100 or so
by jbicha on Fri 5th Apr 2013 22:10 UTC
jbicha
Member since:
2008-07-10

25? Steam offers 100 or so titles for Linux:

https://store.steampowered.com/search/?os=linux

Reply Score: 3

RE: More like 100 or so
by WorknMan on Fri 5th Apr 2013 22:30 UTC in reply to "More like 100 or so"
WorknMan Member since:
2005-11-13

25? Steam offers 100 or so titles for Linux:


Still, if I were going to build a box for gaming, Linux/Ubuntu would definitely NOT be my first choice.

Reply Score: 0

RE[2]: More like 100 or so
by TechGeek on Fri 5th Apr 2013 22:35 UTC in reply to "RE: More like 100 or so"
TechGeek Member since:
2006-01-14

Why? Its a reasonable machine that doesn't need a lot of horsepower. It will run just as fast 3 years from now as it does today. Not Windows malware or spyware. And Valve has pledged support for it for the future. You also can get a great warranty on a pre built linux workstation which is hard to come by and its got the hardware to do 3d intensive tasks.

Reply Score: 10

RE[3]: More like 100 or so
by lucas_maximus on Sat 6th Apr 2013 13:08 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: More like 100 or so"
lucas_maximus Member since:
2009-08-18

Why? Its a reasonable machine that doesn't need a lot of horsepower.


Sorry i3 machines simply don't have the horsepower for a decent gaming experience.

It will run just as fast 3 years from now as it does today. Not Windows malware or spyware.


Sorry my Windows 7 install is just as fast on my work machine as it was 2 years ago when I got my machine.


And Valve has pledged support for it for the future. You also can get a great warranty on a pre built linux workstation which is hard to come by and its got the hardware to do 3d intensive tasks.


However Ubuntu hasn't. Dell got burnt before when the next version of ubuntu didn't work on "ubuntu" certified hardware and the canonical haven't been brilliant on QA.

Reply Score: 3

RE[4]: More like 100 or so
by tonny on Sat 6th Apr 2013 16:32 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: More like 100 or so"
tonny Member since:
2011-12-22

Sorry i3 machines simply don't have the horsepower for a decent gaming experience.

i3 is decent for gaming, if you have good vga card. And NVIDIA GeForce GTX 645 is quite good one, I heard.

However Ubuntu hasn't. Dell got burnt before when the next version of ubuntu didn't work on "ubuntu" certified hardware and the canonical haven't been brilliant on QA.

True this.

Reply Score: 2

RE[5]: More like 100 or so
by lucas_maximus on Sat 6th Apr 2013 20:47 UTC in reply to "RE[4]: More like 100 or so"
lucas_maximus Member since:
2009-08-18

i3, Geforce 645 is good for gaming now, but when the next-gen consoles come out we will have games that will push PCs again.

If I was spending money on a new machine I would go for an i5 or better, same with the GPU.

Reply Score: 3

v RE[4]: More like 100 or so
by delta0.delta0 on Sun 7th Apr 2013 10:15 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: More like 100 or so"
RE[5]: More like 100 or so
by lucas_maximus on Sun 7th Apr 2013 11:24 UTC in reply to "RE[4]: More like 100 or so"
lucas_maximus Member since:
2009-08-18

You can customise and buy any of those 4 listed:

---
Intel Core i7-3770 3.4GHz Quad Core
Ubuntu operating system
8GB Dual Channel DDR3 at 1600MHz (2 DIMMS) *
1.5GB Nvidia GeForce GTX 660 *
---

So its not limited to just the i3 version.


No but I wouldn't buy $1000 machine that has a 1.5 GB 660GTX if I wanted a gaming machine.

Windows tends to crap out performance wise after a while due to the registry, the single worst ill thought out idea to ever hit any operating system. The concept of a registry is just stupid and shit.


No it doesn't I have a few hundred programs installed on my work PC. This is a myth from the Windows 2000 era.

You can bring up any anecdotal evidence you want to back up your claims, it still doesn't change the fact that Windows (including 7) is known to suffer performance issues over time due to registry bloat. This is why Registry Cleaners exist. [q]

What you are saying is anecdotal. If you go around installing lots of crap on your system then you get problems with Windows.

The same happens if you install lots of stuff on Linux that has services.

Windows is a magical beast that falls over after a certain amount of time. When people say this I really think they don't really understand the basics of how computers work.

[q]To me it seems quite opposite, Dell must have been happy with the previous trials to now offer a greater range of Linux based platforms.

FYI: Ubuntu 12.04 is LTS release with 5 years support, so it does come with 5 years support from Ubuntu.


No Dell are getting in on the hype of Steam on Linux.

Except they don't actually keep up to date with things like browsers and they are reducing the support.

Reply Score: 2

v RE[6]: More like 100 or so
by delta0.delta0 on Sun 7th Apr 2013 11:52 UTC in reply to "RE[5]: More like 100 or so"
RE[7]: More like 100 or so
by lucas_maximus on Sun 7th Apr 2013 16:19 UTC in reply to "RE[6]: More like 100 or so"
lucas_maximus Member since:
2009-08-18

Sorry non of those machines are future proof. Ubuntu has iffy track record with updates and supported hardware at best. It still isn't a good deal.

It hardly ever happens. I have not seen modern machine have problems to do with the registry and I work in an office with over 100 windows 7 machines.

While it can happen doesn't mean it always happens.

Reply Score: 1

RE[6]: More like 100 or so
by tylerdurden on Sun 7th Apr 2013 19:12 UTC in reply to "RE[5]: More like 100 or so"
tylerdurden Member since:
2009-03-17



No Dell are getting in on the hype of Steam on Linux.


You should then contact both Dell and Canonical, for you seem to know more than they do about their current situation:

http://www.ubuntu.com/partners/dell

Reply Score: 2

RE[7]: More like 100 or so
by lucas_maximus on Mon 8th Apr 2013 14:52 UTC in reply to "RE[6]: More like 100 or so"
lucas_maximus Member since:
2009-08-18

Whoopie doo.

When the next ubuntu release doesn't work reliably on these machines, I sure certain people on here will have selective memory again.

Reply Score: 2

RE[6]: More like 100 or so
by delta0.delta0 on Tue 9th Apr 2013 07:00 UTC in reply to "RE[5]: More like 100 or so"
delta0.delta0 Member since:
2010-06-01

All I need to say to you is this again:


From Microsoft themselves:


http://support.microsoft.com/kb/2498915

SYMPTOMS
Consider the following scenario:

You may discover that some of your registry hives are abnormally large or “bloated”. Registry hives that are in this state can cause various performance issues and errors in the system log.
Back to the top | Give Feedback

CAUSE
There can be many causes for this issue. Troubleshooting the actual cause can be a long and tedious process. In this scenario, you simply want to compress the registry hives to a normal state.

Article ID: 2498915 - Last Review: March 16, 2011 - Revision: 3.0



You can live in denial all you want that is straight from Microsoft.

Your comments begin to seem ever more bitter and twisted as Linux gains in popularity. Linux / Unix now controls the tablet market and the smartphone market.

Your precious windows is fast falling out of favour. The Microsoft smear campaigns only serve to show how ever more desperate Microsoft is getting and I love it.

Thank you Valve for porting Steam to Linux, for making the Steambox's primary platform Linux, thank you.

Reply Score: 1

RE[4]: More like 100 or so
by ichi on Sun 7th Apr 2013 11:43 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: More like 100 or so"
ichi Member since:
2007-03-06

Sorry i3 machines simply don't have the horsepower for a decent gaming experience.


The i3 is the cheapest option, but there are also options for an i5 or i7 for that X51.

Reply Score: 3

RE[3]: More like 100 or so
by WorknMan on Sat 6th Apr 2013 16:43 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: More like 100 or so"
WorknMan Member since:
2005-11-13

Why? Its a reasonable machine that doesn't need a lot of horsepower. It will run just as fast 3 years from now as it does today. Not Windows malware or spyware. And Valve has pledged support for it for the future. You also can get a great warranty on a pre built linux workstation which is hard to come by and its got the hardware to do 3d intensive task


I didn't say Linux wasn't up to the task, but for the foreseeable future, games will be ported to Windows first, and Linux... if you're lucky.

Reply Score: 3

RE[4]: More like 100 or so
by tylerdurden on Sun 7th Apr 2013 19:24 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: More like 100 or so"
tylerdurden Member since:
2009-03-17

Apparently the trend for the past few years has been to port games to consoles first, and then to windows...

Reply Score: 3

RE[5]: More like 100 or so
by cdude on Mon 8th Apr 2013 06:49 UTC in reply to "RE[4]: More like 100 or so"
cdude Member since:
2008-09-21

Apparently consoles and more and more tablets/mobile. The story is changing with customers shifting away en mass from PC to tablets/mobile consumer-devices. That may hit first-ego shooters last but games genres are more then that and lots of them already shifted to more profitable app markets. The future is OpenGL.

Edited 2013-04-08 06:54 UTC

Reply Score: 2

RE[2]: More like 100 or so
by twitterfire on Sat 6th Apr 2013 21:12 UTC in reply to "RE: More like 100 or so"
twitterfire Member since:
2008-09-11


Still, if I were going to build a box for gaming, Linux/Ubuntu would definitely NOT be my first choice.

Why? You can play Frozen Bubble and TuxRacer.

Edited 2013-04-06 21:19 UTC

Reply Score: 7

Dell is on a role
by delta0.delta0 on Sat 6th Apr 2013 00:31 UTC
delta0.delta0
Member since:
2010-06-01

I have a feeling this is the first wave of things to come. I am waiting for my dell developer xps laptop to arrive:

http://www.dell.com/Learn/us/en/555/campaigns/xps-linux-laptop?c=us...

even available in the Netherlands Thom ;)

Now this, I wasn't actually expecting Dell to be jumping in feet first like this, a gaming rig seriously ?. This is pretty awesome I have to say.

Dell seems to understand most of us using Linux actually want good hardware and are not after budget systems.

Once the steambox is officially released, the proper AAA games will also be released for it. We know left 4 dead 2 is working on Linux, I wonder what else Valve have cooking.

Reply Score: 4

Year of the Linux ...
by Gone fishing on Sat 6th Apr 2013 09:56 UTC
Gone fishing
Member since:
2006-02-22

As proprietary systems seem to become increasingly locked down, by hardware systems Restricted boot, or DRM systems that require permanent connections to the Web, whilst harvesting user information it seem to me that may be ready for….

Reply Score: 3

RE: Year of the Linux ...
by missingxtension on Sat 6th Apr 2013 14:37 UTC in reply to "Year of the Linux ..."
missingxtension Member since:
2011-01-14

Oh please, no thanks on the drm.
You would never remember buying a retail boxed copy of half life 2 ep1 and having to install steam? That's the only reason I have a steam account. What about people all over Europe stuck with a game they could not play, why because to play single player you needed internet. You would never remember that, I bet you don't remember buying physical games that can be resold and borrowed. I gave my friend my steam user and password so he could play half life two, along with the retail box. That is pathetic!! Once the serial is registered to me, that's it.
You have always been able to game. On Linux, I was gaming on Linux since q3 and et. Take steam crap and keep it. Give me stand alone ports.
Steam is DRM at its finest, then to make things worse.
If you want to play. You have to update. On a 50meg connection you would still download at 700kb/sec.
There is a reason a lot of companies are signed up with steam, its not because of the digital distribution either.
Download pacsteam and see for yourself, they have a list of compatible games, if you install a game that's not on the list. The game won't work. Yes that's DRM on top of drm. Not to mention you can actually get banned from your account and won't be able to access the games you are renting from them.

Reply Score: 2

RE[2]: Year of the Linux ...
by Gone fishing on Sat 6th Apr 2013 23:49 UTC in reply to "RE: Year of the Linux ..."
Gone fishing Member since:
2006-02-22

I bet you don't remember buying physical games that can be resold and borrowed. I gave my friend my steam user and password so he could play half life two, along with the retail box. That is pathetic!! Once the serial is registered to me, that's it.


Oddly I do remember but I'm not a gamer the only game I ever really got into was the original Doom. I'm aware of Steams DRM but at least with Linux its not built into the very nature of the platform - you can choose what to install and what not to install.

Reply Score: 1

v Hahaha
by Lava_Croft on Sat 6th Apr 2013 10:49 UTC
RE: Hahaha
by saso on Sun 7th Apr 2013 08:14 UTC in reply to "Hahaha"
saso Member since:
2007-04-18

If your head weren't stuck so far up your ass, you'd know that games on Steam aren't your typical fart apps that fill Apple's or Google's online stores. Steam carries ~1900 titles in total and the figure quoted in the article (25 linux games) is wrong anyway. A single look though the Steam online store tells you that the actual number is 97, or about 5% of their entire catalog.

Reply Score: 2

RE[2]: Hahaha
by Wafflez on Sun 7th Apr 2013 09:58 UTC in reply to "RE: Hahaha"
Wafflez Member since:
2011-06-26

And what makes you think that "97 games" doesn't deserve "Hahahahaha" also?

Reply Score: 3

RE[3]: Hahaha
by saso on Sun 7th Apr 2013 19:11 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Hahaha"
saso Member since:
2007-04-18

Because the first release of Steam on Linux was less than two months ago. If this rate of release (or porting) is maintained, Steam for Linux would overtake the Mac catalog by about the end of this year (100 games per 1.5 months, Mac has ~600 games, so about 9 months from now). Whether this will happen remains to be seen. Chances are the Mac ports will also get released at a similar rate, since both platforms are *nix/OpenGL-based, so work done on one translates into little porting effort to the other.
Scoffing at a just-released platform for having little software available is like ridiculing a 2 year-old for not being able to run the Marathon. The interesting thing isn't the current value of the number of games available, it's the first derivative of it, and that appears to be a clear positive (and it's growing, i.e. the second derivative is positive as well) for Steam on Linux.

Reply Score: 3

Woo
by liamdawe on Sat 6th Apr 2013 13:50 UTC
liamdawe
Member since:
2006-07-04

There will be more and more of this happening, it's great to see, for people who think there aren't many Linux games visit http://www.gamingonlinux.com and see the vast amount of news on games everday!

Reply Score: 2

It would be nice
by twitterfire on Sun 7th Apr 2013 13:25 UTC
twitterfire
Member since:
2008-09-11

It would be nice to have alternatives to Windows and consoles to play games - but real alternatives not something you can only play open source games or games from humble bundles like Steam for Linux offers now.

Ouya is not an alternative. You can hook your phone or tablet or pc stick to the big screen or to a monitor and Play Android games.

Alienware "gaming" PCs with Ubuntu aren't an alternative, Linux + Steam isn't a viable option atm.

Gamers like to play AAA games and MMORPGS. Until such titles come to linux, we can't talk about an alternative to Windows or consoles.

Let's hope that Valve will be successful and manage to push linux gaming. The more platforms, the better.

Reply Score: 2

RE: It would be nice
by Neolander on Mon 8th Apr 2013 06:29 UTC in reply to "It would be nice"
Neolander Member since:
2010-03-08

It would be nice to have alternatives to Windows and consoles to play games - but real alternatives not something you can only play open source games or games from humble bundles like Steam for Linux offers now.

Gamers like to play AAA games and MMORPGS. Until such titles come to linux, we can't talk about an alternative to Windows or consoles.

Let's hope that Valve will be successful and manage to push linux gaming. The more platforms, the better.

Nice to see you be a little bit optimistic about the Linux ecosystem for a change ;)

Regarding AAA titles, I also think that this is what will make or break any "Steambox" candidate, which is why the Serious Sam bit in the announcement got my attention. Does anyone know how the developers of such a game were led to release such a title on Linux, and if the process can reliably be extended to more games in the future ?

Edited 2013-04-08 06:31 UTC

Reply Score: 3

tidux
Member since:
2011-08-13

Thanks, Dell!

Reply Score: 2

Comment by ilovebeer
by ilovebeer on Mon 8th Apr 2013 15:57 UTC
ilovebeer
Member since:
2011-08-08

A pre-built pc with Ubuntu installed on it... Not impressed.

Reply Score: 1