Linked by Thom Holwerda on Fri 12th Apr 2013 09:44 UTC
Google "Not many of us like thinking about death - especially our own. But making plans for what happens after you're gone is really important for the people you leave behind. So today, we're launching a new feature that makes it easy to tell Google what you want done with your digital assets when you die or can no longer use your account." Trailblazing. If you ever wonder why people tend to be favourable to Google - despite its many failing - it's stuff like this. While others are running cringe-inducing marketing campaigns or planning yet another patent lawsuit, Google gives users an immeasurably important feature like this. If you recently lost somebody, you will understand.
Order by: Score:
Comment by petrasl
by petrasl on Fri 12th Apr 2013 11:20 UTC
petrasl
Member since:
2006-01-03

And when Google dies ?

Reply Score: 11

New testament
by Gestahlt on Fri 12th Apr 2013 12:17 UTC
Gestahlt
Member since:
2011-10-17

This is great. Actually that is something i thought of.. i was like "ugh, i have to write scripts, have servers payed in advance and so on"

This is a good thing in many ways.
For me its something i really appreciate. But how does Google know when i die?

Reply Score: 3

RE: New testament
by anevilyak on Fri 12th Apr 2013 12:29 UTC in reply to "New testament"
anevilyak Member since:
2005-09-14

In the case of the tool above, it's based on not signing into your google account for more than a user-configurable interval, i.e. I have it set to do so if I don't sign into my account for a year, with a warning texted to my phone 3 months before the deadline. It's quite flexible and has a number of options in that regard.

Reply Score: 6

Comment by Kroc
by Kroc on Fri 12th Apr 2013 12:36 UTC
Kroc
Member since:
2005-11-10

Good move. Frankly, should be law. Websites should not be allowed to hold your data indefinitely.

How about OSNews supporting such a feature?

Reply Score: 4

But
by darknexus on Fri 12th Apr 2013 13:34 UTC
darknexus
Member since:
2008-07-15

How many people get your data before your user actions take place, especially if you will it to someone else? That's a potential advertising goldmine, and you can bet Google will take advantage of it before honoring your wishes.

Reply Score: 4

RE: But
by WereCatf on Fri 12th Apr 2013 13:49 UTC in reply to "But"
WereCatf Member since:
2006-02-15

That's a potential advertising goldmine


How is a dead person an advertising goldmine? Live people are much, much more interesting.

Reply Score: 4

RE[2]: But
by zima on Fri 12th Apr 2013 14:52 UTC in reply to "RE: But"
zima Member since:
2005-07-06

How is a dead person an advertising goldmine?.

Well there's the whole death industry to consider... (caskets, graves, funerals; all those pointless and expensive customs)

Reply Score: 5

RE[3]: But
by JAlexoid on Sat 13th Apr 2013 22:41 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: But"
JAlexoid Member since:
2009-05-19

And who signs on the dotted line when purchasing the coffin? A dead person? While the death business is lucrative, dead people are as interesting for marketing purposes as stones.

Reply Score: 3

RE[4]: But
by zima on Sun 14th Apr 2013 15:16 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: But"
zima Member since:
2005-07-06

Knowing who are the relatives of the dead person could be quite profitable though. At the least it could be something as simple as "who is using the same computer as somebody just deceased?"

Reply Score: 2

RE[2]: But
by darknexus on Fri 12th Apr 2013 23:39 UTC in reply to "RE: But"
darknexus Member since:
2008-07-15

"That's a potential advertising goldmine


How is a dead person an advertising goldmine? Live people are much, much more interesting.
"
Of course they are, and it's live people they'll get depending on your preferences. That's where the advertising goldmine is: Google looking at the dead person's data then corolating that with perhaps a relative or partner. That could get nasty.

Reply Score: 2

RE[3]: But
by Sodki on Sun 14th Apr 2013 01:12 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: But"
Sodki Member since:
2005-11-10

That's where the advertising goldmine is: Google looking at the dead person's data then corolating that with perhaps a relative or partner.


To be fair, I don't think the Google advertising platform works this way. Think simple.

Reply Score: 2

Living Will
by fretinator on Fri 12th Apr 2013 14:02 UTC
fretinator
Member since:
2005-07-06

I, fretinator, being of soundish mind, do hereby bequeeth my insightful, profound, and moving comments on OSNews (hereafter known as E.L.Q. lite) to Thom Holwerda (hereafter known as Mr. Fiona Apple) for perpetuity. The other 99%, such as this, I'm taking to the grave.

Reply Score: 14

Great stuff
by bowkota on Fri 12th Apr 2013 15:45 UTC
bowkota
Member since:
2011-10-12

Great stuff from the company that's as trustworthy as Facebook when it comes to privacy.

Personally I prefer this article from an individual with some insight and proper analysis instead of the the praise from the usual suspects.
http://www.asymco.com/2013/04/10/making-rain/

Reply Score: 4

Does Google Own You?
by benali72 on Sat 13th Apr 2013 07:36 UTC
benali72
Member since:
2008-05-03

Why would you give Google anything important of yours to own in the first place?

Reply Score: 3

RE: Does Google Own You?
by ilovebeer on Sat 13th Apr 2013 17:01 UTC in reply to "Does Google Own You?"
ilovebeer Member since:
2011-08-08

Why would you give Google anything important of yours to own in the first place?

People forget that Google is a business, not a charity. They exist to generate profit -- that's the bottom line.

Reply Score: 2

perception
by maccouch on Mon 15th Apr 2013 10:10 UTC
maccouch
Member since:
2012-03-14

If you ever wonder why people tend to be favourable to Google - despite its many failing


where by "people" you mean, basically, you?

Reply Score: 1