Linked by Thom Holwerda on Tue 16th Apr 2013 09:29 UTC
Google The day has finally come: Google has started shipping Google Glass to the lucky few early adopters. Now that it's shipping, Google has also unveiled a lot more about the API and the specifications of the device itself. While the company had already given out substantial details at earlier occasions, there are still a few surprises here.
Order by: Score:
Full speed ahead
by Priest on Tue 16th Apr 2013 10:23 UTC
Priest
Member since:
2006-05-12

Google started a "Glass Collective" to provide VC funding for Glass devs earlier this month. It seems like they are definitely committed to getting it off the ground.

Reply Score: 5

Terms of Service
by WereCatf on Tue 16th Apr 2013 10:25 UTC
WereCatf
Member since:
2006-02-15

For instance, programmers are not allowed to serve or include advertisements in their Google Glass service, nor are they allowed to charge for them. In addition, you are not allowed to use user data obtained through Glass for advertising purposes either - you can't use it yourself or forward it to an advertising agency. I'm guessing this is done to make sure Google attracts the right kind of developers - enthusiasts who are in it not for the money, but for the excitement of a new class of device.


Well, this should be delightful news. Every single god damn time there's been talk about Google Glass there've atleast a few people proclaiming how they don't want ads pushed in the faces or how Google and everyone else will just use Google Glass for marketing. The only thing left for these "privacy enthusiasts" to complain about is the ability for Google Glass to record audio and/or video, but...well, once you realize that you already are under 24/7 surveillance and tracking there's not really much privacy to lose anyways.

Reply Score: 5

RE: Terms of Service
by Kochise on Tue 16th Apr 2013 12:00 UTC in reply to "Terms of Service"
Kochise Member since:
2006-03-03

Yeah, so why being so prude ? Get naked all day long, show off everything !

BTW, Google Glass = http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0114558/

Old stuff, new snuff...

Kochise

Edited 2013-04-16 12:02 UTC

Reply Score: 2

RE: Terms of Service
by Bill Shooter of Bul on Tue 16th Apr 2013 12:54 UTC in reply to "Terms of Service"
Bill Shooter of Bul Member since:
2006-07-14

There is a huge difference between the Big Brother government surveillance and the "little brother" creepy guy surveillance. I'm not happy about Big Brother, but I don't personally feel immediate danger from that surveillance. Now, creepy guy/gal across the bar? I do not want to show up on his tapes.

Reply Score: 5

RE[2]: Terms of Service
by WereCatf on Tue 16th Apr 2013 15:38 UTC in reply to "RE: Terms of Service"
WereCatf Member since:
2006-02-15

There is a huge difference between the Big Brother government surveillance and the "little brother" creepy guy surveillance. I'm not happy about Big Brother, but I don't personally feel immediate danger from that surveillance. Now, creepy guy/gal across the bar? I do not want to show up on his tapes.


How about all the stores with cameras, some of which look on the street outside the store windows and some of which are embedded in the mannequins? Photographers and hobbyist filmographers? People with phones with cameras? Or action cameras? How about people with dash-cams? The fact is that you're already on "tape" by multiple different sources every time you stick your head out in the open.

Reply Score: 3

RE[3]: Terms of Service
by Bill Shooter of Bul on Tue 16th Apr 2013 15:46 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Terms of Service"
Bill Shooter of Bul Member since:
2006-07-14

Ok, maybe there is also a "middle brother" too, the store cams. A store camera just stays in a single position and films. There *might* be a creepy guy at the other end watching it at all times, but probably not.

Current cell phones are a concern in some situations, but you can usually tell when they are filming and when the are not. Certainly *can* be unacceptably creepy and wrong.

The more it gets closer to an individual personally and intentionally filming you and the less aware of the filming you are, the creepier and less acceptable it gets.

While I haven't seen glass in person, I'd imagine there isn't an obvious way to tell if they are recording or not. Which makes it much easier than a cell phone to secretly film people.

Don't get me wrong, I'm not 100% anti glass. But I certainly understand the concerns people have with the privacy aspect. There are certain acquaintances that I would explicitly avoid if they were glass users.

Reply Score: 3

RE: Terms of Service
by lucas_maximus on Tue 16th Apr 2013 18:09 UTC in reply to "Terms of Service"
lucas_maximus Member since:
2009-08-18

well, once you realize that you already are under 24/7 surveillance and tracking there's not really much privacy to lose anyways.


That not quite the point is it.

Anyway some people just don't like knowing they are filmed.

Reply Score: 4

Brain cancer ?
by Kochise on Tue 16th Apr 2013 11:58 UTC
Kochise
Member since:
2006-03-03

I'm eager to see how it will increase in the following years, having a wifi/bt device just beside your brain for such a long time frame each day.

Just a question, since the issue has been raised for mobile phones...

Kochise

Reply Score: 5

Everything goes through Google
by Shane on Tue 16th Apr 2013 13:54 UTC
Shane
Member since:
2005-07-06

Looking at the docs, I see that everything goes through Google's servers.

For example, if I want to display a Timeline item on my Glass device, I need to send a POST request to www.googleapis.com/mirror/v1/timeline. When I interact with Glass, the device reports back to Google, which then sends a response back to my app. Essentially, this is how a Glassware app works:

My Glass Device <-> Google <-> My App

A Glass app is a web application that talks to Google. A Glass app does not actually run locally on the device. Google mediates everything. This is a very closed system, and Google sees everything.

Reply Score: 4

RE: Everything goes through Google
by Kochise on Tue 16th Apr 2013 14:08 UTC in reply to "Everything goes through Google"
Kochise Member since:
2006-03-03

Looking at the docs, I see that everything goes through Google's servers.

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0088846/
http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0048918/
...

Kochise

Reply Score: 2

twitterfire Member since:
2008-09-11

When I interact with Glass, the device reports back to Google, which then sends a response back to my app. Essentially, this is how a Glassware app works:

My Glass Device Google My App

A Glass app is a web application that talks to Google. A Glass app does not actually run locally on the device. Google mediates everything. This is a very closed system, and Google sees everything.


So, if I wear googlass in toilet, guys @ google would be able to tell if I ate chili last evening or not. ;)

Reply Score: 3

RE: Everything goes through Google
by Nelson on Tue 16th Apr 2013 17:38 UTC in reply to "Everything goes through Google"
Nelson Member since:
2005-11-29

I'm sure you're aware that push notifications on most mobile OSes work the exact same way?

Its usually:

Your app <> Push Notification Service <> Your Service

That means every inbox, message, tweet, DM, or IM that you have been pushed has passed through these servers.

Reply Score: 2

Shane Member since:
2005-07-06

Yep, but the Mirror API does that for everything, and both ways. User interactions with Glass go to Google first and Google then notifies the app.

So, like you said, Glassware apps tend to be limited at the moment to notification style HUD stuff. And they require an Internet connection to work.

It also raises the question: will Google be indexing everything that you see in Glass? Will they also be indexing all your interactions, every single menu choice that you make?

I was very excited about Glass when it was first announced, but I am pretty disappointed with the Mirror API as it stands.

Reply Score: 2

Just Saying...
by shinkou on Tue 16th Apr 2013 14:04 UTC
shinkou
Member since:
2011-03-24

I still want my own little privacy. Don't look at me with your f**king googlass on.

Reply Score: 6

RE: Just Saying...
by Thom_Holwerda on Tue 16th Apr 2013 14:06 UTC in reply to "Just Saying..."
Thom_Holwerda Member since:
2005-06-29

Will you please put your phone in your pocket and not take it out when I'm around? You might be recording me and I have no way to tell.

Reply Score: 6

RE[2]: Just Saying...
by Kochise on Tue 16th Apr 2013 14:09 UTC in reply to "RE: Just Saying..."
Kochise Member since:
2006-03-03

Grab the phone, check, give it back...

Kochise

Reply Score: 1

RE[3]: Just Saying...
by Thom_Holwerda on Tue 16th Apr 2013 14:12 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Just Saying..."
Thom_Holwerda Member since:
2005-06-29

Right, because that will go down well. Also, it's illegal.

Reply Score: 3

RE[4]: Just Saying...
by lucas_maximus on Tue 16th Apr 2013 18:11 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: Just Saying..."
lucas_maximus Member since:
2009-08-18

I can guarantee in some situations some people won't know or care, these people are usually larger than you and have lots of large friends.

TBH These things will attract attention from the wrong sort of people.

Edited 2013-04-16 18:12 UTC

Reply Score: 3

RE[5]: Just Saying...
by galvanash on Thu 18th Apr 2013 05:37 UTC in reply to "RE[4]: Just Saying..."
galvanash Member since:
2006-01-25

I can guarantee in some situations some people won't know or care, these people are usually larger than you and have lots of large friends.


Exactly! I am in no way against Google Glasses used responsibly in the public square, but it is going too far to think you have a implicit "right" to wear them anywhere around anyone at any time... The law may be on your side, but that won't keep your glasses from getting broke (or worse) if you happen to find yourself in the wrong situation...

All Im saying is people get their asses kicked or the phone taken all the time when they point them at a cop, a celebrity, or just a grumpy asshole. Saying its against the law is fine, but it generally doesn't make a bit of difference... The problem with GG is you don't have to whip them out and point them - you just have to be wearing them to elicit such a reaction.

I would just recommend people be cautious and think about where they are before putting them on - someone around you may not appreciate it much.

Reply Score: 4

RE[2]: Just Saying...
by bowkota on Tue 16th Apr 2013 15:31 UTC in reply to "RE: Just Saying..."
bowkota Member since:
2011-10-12

Will you please put your phone in your pocket and not take it out when I'm around? You might be recording me and I have no way to tell.


Relax fanboi, the man has a point. Glass is an interesting product but the privacy concerns are definitely there.

You don't use your smartphone at eye level, you glance down on it. When someone is taking a picture of you or a video it's pretty evident; not the case with Glass.

Edited 2013-04-16 15:41 UTC

Reply Score: 8

RE[3]: Just Saying...
by Kochise on Tue 16th Apr 2013 15:56 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Just Saying..."
Kochise Member since:
2006-03-03

"Glass... record that busty woman before me !"

A new way to get in touch... with your lawyer ? Or your dentist ? Maybe both...

Kochise

Edited 2013-04-16 15:57 UTC

Reply Score: 6

RE[3]: Just Saying...
by twitterfire on Tue 16th Apr 2013 16:53 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Just Saying..."
twitterfire Member since:
2008-09-11

You don't use your smartphone at eye level, you glance down on it. When someone is taking a picture of you or a video it's pretty evident; not the case with Glass.


I took pretty interesting pictures and movies keeping the phone at shoulder level. You just have to know where to aim and how much to tilt your phone. ;)

Pro-tip: if you attach your phone on top of your shoes and go in a hypermarket, you can get some amazing shots. ;)

Reply Score: 5

RE[4]: Just Saying...
by bowkota on Tue 16th Apr 2013 17:13 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: Just Saying..."
bowkota Member since:
2011-10-12


Pro-tip: if you attach your phone on top of your shoes and go in a hypermarket, you can get some amazing shots. ;)


Yes, another way is to get a good zoom lens for your camera and look around the neighbourhood at night...

My point was that the creepiness of Glass (and any similar technology) is effortless and discrete.

Reply Score: 4

Comment by twitterfire
by twitterfire on Tue 16th Apr 2013 15:07 UTC
twitterfire
Member since:
2008-09-11

I wonder how much time will take Apple to release iGlass and sue Google for some design patent infringement.

Reply Score: 3

Are the term temporary?
by bowkota on Tue 16th Apr 2013 15:34 UTC
bowkota
Member since:
2011-10-12

http://news.cnet.com/8301-10812_3-57579762/google-glassware-develop...

"and they "may not charge" users to download apps for the device."

I'm guessing this will be changed eventually, otherwise what's the incentive to develop any apps in the first place?
Not a good incentive for making great applications.

Reply Score: 2

RE: Are the term temporary?
by Kroc on Wed 17th Apr 2013 06:19 UTC in reply to "Are the term temporary?"
Kroc Member since:
2005-11-10

Simple. Brand-building. Being first in can be worth a lot down the line, but it's a real risky game. Think of VisiCalc. Google is hoping that app developers want to be the brand that Glassholes recognise first once the competition comes along.

There will be advertising. It just won't be banner ads. Google don't know what it will be yet fully and want use-cases shoved in front of them (for free) first.

Reply Score: 2

Comment by ilovebeer
by ilovebeer on Tue 16th Apr 2013 16:15 UTC
ilovebeer
Member since:
2011-08-08

It's a little premature to determine what this device is or isn't as far as how Google is going to use it. Let's give Google a chance to fully monetize it and then we'll revisit the issue of privacy, marketing, and so on.

You'll be hard-pressed to find any for-profit company that cares more about your privacy than their bottom line.

Reply Score: 2

RE: Comment by ilovebeer
by twitterfire on Tue 16th Apr 2013 16:57 UTC in reply to "Comment by ilovebeer"
twitterfire Member since:
2008-09-11

give Google a chance to fully monetize it and then we'll revisit the issue of privacy


Knowing google's history of tracking everything when you use google products, I'd say worry about privacy and personal data and user tracking now and worry about how google monetizes it, later.

Reply Score: 2

RE: Comment by ilovebeer
by Nelson on Tue 16th Apr 2013 17:40 UTC in reply to "Comment by ilovebeer"
Nelson Member since:
2005-11-29

Not just this, lets wait a few revisions to see how their overall aim for the project is. Maybe the way people envision Glass used today is very different from how it will actually be used a few years down the road.

Don't judge an idea off of its version 1.0 deliverables, as the initial version is usually the minimum viable release.

Reply Score: 2

Very disappointed from the API
by kloty on Tue 16th Apr 2013 20:38 UTC
kloty
Member since:
2005-07-07

Hi,

after watching the API introduction, I'm very disappointed. Is it possible to create LBS or AR apps? It was not mentioned and from such a simple API I really doubt it. So all these phantasies about identifying people just from looking at them, are far beyond the possibilities of Glass.

Reply Score: 2

RE: Very disappointed from the API
by ebasconp on Wed 17th Apr 2013 02:01 UTC in reply to "Very disappointed from the API"
ebasconp Member since:
2006-05-09

Come on dude! It is just an API, and an alpha stage API: it can be modified, improved, rewritten, deprecated, refactored, etc. If the API does not do what you want right now, that can change easily in next releases.

Reply Score: 3

Shane Member since:
2005-07-06

The fundamental design of the API itself is disappointing. The Mirror API is simply a web service. You can't write apps that run directly on Glass.

Reply Score: 3

Skydiving
by tony on Wed 17th Apr 2013 03:35 UTC
tony
Member since:
2005-07-06

This would be awesome for skydiving (think that was in one of the promo videos). Just needs an altimeter app, and hands free altitude awareness.

Could also be great for aviation. Essentially, Iron Man Jarvis-style situational awareness of other aircraft as well as altitude, speed, and heading.

You could even program in a snarky british voice: "You're at 3,000 feet, so perhaps now would be a good time to deploy your parachute."

Reply Score: 3

RE: Skydiving
by zima on Mon 22nd Apr 2013 17:05 UTC in reply to "Skydiving"
zima Member since:
2005-07-06

Skydiving or aviation gear is built to better standards than Glass ...which is anyway just a glorified webcam, it can't really do much of the Augmented Reality stuff.

Also, skydiving often prohibits any recording devices; any such distractions are a huge safety hazard.

Reply Score: 2

Comment by Dr-ROX
by Dr-ROX on Wed 17th Apr 2013 18:11 UTC
Dr-ROX
Member since:
2006-01-03

One thing it needs is an app, that shows the power level of the people your are looking at. It woul be interesting to se who's over 9000!

Reply Score: 2

Comment by jigzat
by jigzat on Wed 17th Apr 2013 19:33 UTC
jigzat
Member since:
2008-10-30

!!!!!OMG!!!!!!! it is the same old debate all over again about Windows vs Mac OS vs GNU/Linux vs Amiga, I'm getting a headache.

Although Microsoft is right I don't think IOS is running out of steam, I think they are saving it. Google and Android phones manufacturers are pushing features way too fast and one cannot keep that peace for a long time because it will eventually become boring and bloated. When users get tired of Android the same way it happened with Blackberry and some IOS users they will move to the next new flashy thing, maybe WP8 or something else.

Reply Score: 0

RE: Comment by jigzat
by jigzat on Thu 18th Apr 2013 00:35 UTC in reply to "Comment by jigzat"
jigzat Member since:
2008-10-30

WTF?? my post went to the wrong thread

Reply Score: 1