Linked by Thom Holwerda on Mon 14th Oct 2013 13:31 UTC
Windows

The roll-out of the previous update - GDR2 - isn't even complete (thank you, carriers), and Microsoft is already pushing out the next one, GDR3. This update for Windows Phone 8 is the last one before 8.1 comes out next year, and brings with it a number of small improvements, such a close button in the multitasking view, a driving mode, support for newer hardware and 1080p displays, a rotation lock, and more.

There's no telling as of yet when Windows Phone 8 users will be getting the update, but non-branded phones will most likely get it first. On top of that, if you're a Windows Phone developer, you can get the update straight away.

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Why the delays?
by Bill Shooter of Bul on Mon 14th Oct 2013 14:07 UTC
Bill Shooter of Bul
Member since:
2006-07-14

I thought one of the reasons why Microsoft had such restrictions on the hardware was to ensure that these updates could be universally applied at the same time like the iphone.

Reply Score: 2

RE: Why the delays?
by Thom_Holwerda on Mon 14th Oct 2013 14:17 UTC in reply to "Why the delays?"
Thom_Holwerda Member since:
2005-06-29

Because carriers.

Reply Score: 2

RE[2]: Why the delays?
by darknexus on Mon 14th Oct 2013 14:25 UTC in reply to "RE: Why the delays?"
darknexus Member since:
2008-07-15

Because carriers.

Yet more proof, if we needed it, that carriers should never be permitted to fiddle with our phones' software. Whatever else Apple's gotten wrong, they did at least get that one part right. Microsoft should start closing their software to carrier modification. It would, at least, be one point for Windows Phone if it had guaranteed update roll-outs.

Reply Score: 6

RE[3]: Why the delays?
by Nelson on Mon 14th Oct 2013 14:43 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Why the delays?"
Nelson Member since:
2005-11-29

Carriers don't modify the software, they test the software on their networks. GDR2 was completed in June for example and some devices are just getting it now.

This is what the update program addresses (which is free btw, you can have an app studio registered device which costs nothing).

I have to wonder what kind of mind bending leverage Apple has which got such a concession from carriers.

Reply Score: 3

RE[4]: Why the delays?
by moondevil on Mon 14th Oct 2013 15:59 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: Why the delays?"
moondevil Member since:
2005-07-08

Carriers don't modify the software, they test the software on their networks. GDR2 was completed in June for example and some devices are just getting it now.


Well, I remember back when the N95 was released, Vodafone D2 in Germany changed the firmware to disable wireless access. It was only possible to use UTMS with the Vodafone N95 version.

I have to wonder what kind of mind bending leverage Apple has which got such a concession from carriers.


They never thought iPhone would take off as it did, so they were careless with their deals with Apple. Nowadays it is too late to change it.

That is why they try by all means to avoid anyone else attempts to do the same.

Reply Score: 5

RE[4]: Why the delays?
by Soulbender on Mon 14th Oct 2013 16:27 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: Why the delays?"
Soulbender Member since:
2005-08-18

I have to wonder what kind of mind bending leverage Apple has which got such a concession from carriers.


Jobs was still around back then so the RDF would have been in full effect.

Edited 2013-10-14 16:30 UTC

Reply Score: 3

RE[3]: Why the delays?
by BallmerKnowsBest on Mon 14th Oct 2013 19:27 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Why the delays?"
BallmerKnowsBest Member since:
2008-06-02

"Because carriers.

Yet more proof, if we needed it, that carriers should never be permitted to fiddle with our phones' software. Whatever else Apple's gotten wrong, they did at least get that one part right.
"

Please, Apple bends over and grabs their ankles for carriers far more enthusiastically than any of the other big smartphone makers - they just do it in slightly less noticeable ways. Like blocking tethering, unless it's explicitly enabled by the carrier (along with blocking all 3rd-party tethering apps to further appease the carriers):

http://arstechnica.com/information-technology/2013/10/how-i-share-m...

Reply Score: 2

RE[4]: Why the delays?
by darknexus on Mon 14th Oct 2013 20:06 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: Why the delays?"
darknexus Member since:
2008-07-15

Apple are hardly the only ones to block tethering. Not a problem for me, as my phone's unlocked and not subsidized. I just used it this morning, so I know it absolutely does work.

Reply Score: 3

RE[5]: Why the delays?
by BallmerKnowsBest on Wed 16th Oct 2013 21:28 UTC in reply to "RE[4]: Why the delays?"
BallmerKnowsBest Member since:
2008-06-02

Apple are hardly the only ones to block tethering. Not a problem for me, as my phone's unlocked and not subsidized. I just used it this morning, so I know it absolutely does work.


Translation: the small minority (at least in North America) who use unlocked iPhones can use tethering without any carrier restrictions. Compared to the majority of Android users, who can just go download something like PDANet from the Play store.

And that's supposed to be a rebuttal? LOL!

Reply Score: 3

RE[4]: Why the delays?
by kaiwai on Tue 15th Oct 2013 11:58 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: Why the delays?"
kaiwai Member since:
2005-07-06

And Samsung with their regional locks to the very same carriers who were bad mouth Apple not too long ago is any better? Please, if you want to blame someone for the tether locks then that is a carrier problem or more specifically an American problem based on over promising (unlimited wireless) which is unsustainable long term no matter how many mobile towers and micro-cells you throw up at the problem.

Reply Score: 3

RE[5]: Why the delays?
by BallmerKnowsBest on Wed 16th Oct 2013 20:37 UTC in reply to "RE[4]: Why the delays?"
BallmerKnowsBest Member since:
2008-06-02

And Samsung with their regional locks to the very same carriers who were bad mouth Apple not too long ago is any better?


I'd respond, but I'm still trying to parse that... oh, let's say "sentence."

Please, if you want to blame someone for the tether locks then that is a carrier problem or more specifically an American problem based on over promising (unlimited wireless) which is unsustainable long term no matter how many mobile towers and micro-cells you throw up at the problem.


Durrr.... the article I linked details how Apple (unlike most Android OEMs) also allows carriers to block tethering for metered data plans:

http://arstechnica.com/information-technology/2013/10/how-i-share-m...

Next time, try READING the comment you're replying to first, it does wonders. Hope this helps!

Reply Score: 3

RE[2]: Why the delays?
by Bill Shooter of Bul on Mon 14th Oct 2013 15:19 UTC in reply to "RE: Why the delays?"
Bill Shooter of Bul Member since:
2006-07-14

How does Apple do it?

Reply Score: 2

RE[3]: Why the delays?
by moondevil on Mon 14th Oct 2013 16:02 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Why the delays?"
moondevil Member since:
2005-07-08

The carries were too stupid to accept Apple's conditions of full control, because they never thought iPhone would become what it is nowadays.

With those contracts in place it is hard to shy away from them.

Reply Score: 4

RE[4]: Why the delays?
by tylerdurden on Mon 14th Oct 2013 16:31 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: Why the delays?"
tylerdurden Member since:
2009-03-17

What carriers mainly want are either differentiation or easy customers/sales.

Apple has one of the most effective marketing engines in the world. That means iPhones basically sell themselves, as far as the carriers are concerned. Which is why Apple can negotiate from a strong position.

Other brands/ecosystems require a bit more effort from the carrier to push to the end customers, which means the manufacturers of those products have to buck up to the carriers demands for differentiation via branding/bloatware/experience/etc.

Reply Score: 3

RE[4]: Why the delays?
by Bill Shooter of Bul on Mon 14th Oct 2013 16:57 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: Why the delays?"
Bill Shooter of Bul Member since:
2006-07-14

That's lame. I'm not really upset that Apple gets that privilege, just that its not available to others.

Reply Score: 2

RE[5]: Why the delays?
by darknexus on Mon 14th Oct 2013 19:58 UTC in reply to "RE[4]: Why the delays?"
darknexus Member since:
2008-07-15

That's lame. I'm not really upset that Apple gets that privilege, just that its not available to others.

No reason it couldn't be, but the way the mobile handset market is handled right now is flawed. To fix this, carriers need to be reduced to the dumb data pipes they truly are and all phone subsidies/rentals would need to end.

Reply Score: 2

RE[6]: Why the delays?
by mkone on Mon 14th Oct 2013 21:52 UTC in reply to "RE[5]: Why the delays?"
mkone Member since:
2006-03-14

"That's lame. I'm not really upset that Apple gets that privilege, just that its not available to others.

No reason it couldn't be, but the way the mobile handset market is handled right now is flawed. To fix this, carriers need to be reduced to the dumb data pipes they truly are and all phone subsidies/rentals would need to end.
"

Here in the UK, you now get contracts like the O2 refresh, which basically sells the phone to you for the list price, but allows you to pay for it over a period of time interest free. Of course, you would then have to sign up to a contract of the appropriate length.

The market is already moving that way.

Reply Score: 2

RE[7]: Why the delays?
by darknexus on Mon 14th Oct 2013 22:41 UTC in reply to "RE[6]: Why the delays?"
darknexus Member since:
2008-07-15

Here in the UK, you now get contracts like the O2 refresh, which basically sells the phone to you for the list price, but allows you to pay for it over a period of time interest free. Of course, you would then have to sign up to a contract of the appropriate length.

The market is already moving that way.

T-Mobile has started something similar here in the states, but you're still not free from carrier influence. There's still an insentive for the carriers to "add value" and screw with your phone's software and/or delay your updates in the name of so-called "testing." Were I to get a phone from T-Mobile using one of these contracts, it would still have T-Mobile's modifications shoved on it.

Reply Score: 2

RE[6]: Why the delays?
by Bill Shooter of Bul on Mon 14th Oct 2013 22:07 UTC in reply to "RE[5]: Why the delays?"
Bill Shooter of Bul Member since:
2006-07-14

I understand some of the necessary testing to ensure that the device doesn't screw up their networks, but I would assume that the FTC in the US does most of this. What ever is left for them to actually do, I'd prefer it to be automated and standardized. So with a new version of software, it could be given to a central authority that would just put it in their test lab, press a button and get a report. Done. Over the air to all.

Reply Score: 2

RE[6]: Why the delays?
by moondevil on Tue 15th Oct 2013 07:00 UTC in reply to "RE[5]: Why the delays?"
moondevil Member since:
2005-07-08

In Portugal it was pre-paid from day one for normal customers, when the mobiles got cheap enough to be bough by normal people.

So the market evolved in such a way that only business had contracts, while normal users had pre-paid. They were either free if payed full price, or sim-locked for one/two years with some part of charges used to pay for the mobile.

Nowadays carriers try to shove contracts down people throats, with tricks like pre-paids which are actually contracts that you can quit anytime, but not many people adopt them.

As for buying mobiles goes, since almost all Portuguese now tend to have multiple mobiles, the prices of mobiles carrier free vs carrier locked are about the same, as carriers stopped subsidizing them.

Reply Score: 3

RE[4]: Why the delays?
by dukes on Mon 14th Oct 2013 18:34 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: Why the delays?"
dukes Member since:
2005-07-06

The carries were too stupid to accept Apple's conditions of full control, because they never thought iPhone would become what it is nowadays.

With those contracts in place it is hard to shy away from them.


I don't think that was the case at all. There were plenty phones in history that a carrier could think that it wouldn't be a hit.

The more likely scenario about Apple and carriers is that there is an exchange of money taking place. This is how the business world works.

Reply Score: 3

RE[5]: Why the delays?
by moondevil on Mon 14th Oct 2013 20:15 UTC in reply to "RE[4]: Why the delays?"
moondevil Member since:
2005-07-08

I used to work in telecommunications, politics and money go together.

Reply Score: 3

Comment by Wafflez
by Wafflez on Mon 14th Oct 2013 15:30 UTC
Wafflez
Member since:
2011-06-26

"Windows Phone developer" - as in I've unlocked my phone and can push software from VS? Well, unlocking is free, so I don't see any reason why anyone couldn't upgrade to GDR3.

Edited 2013-10-14 15:42 UTC

Reply Score: 4

Carriers & Updates
by Jbso on Mon 14th Oct 2013 18:53 UTC
Jbso
Member since:
2013-01-05

Why don't folks who are always complaining about updates put their money where their mouth is and start buying unlocked phones? Subsidies are nice, but you can't expect carriers to offer that and not want anything in return. Decide what's more important to you.

Edited 2013-10-14 18:54 UTC

Reply Score: 3

RE: Carriers & Updates
by Nelson on Mon 14th Oct 2013 19:01 UTC in reply to "Carriers & Updates"
Nelson Member since:
2005-11-29

Unfortunately for Windows Phone, unlocked phones still must wait for regional roll outs. Its less terrible, but still bad.

This is a way better solution.

Reply Score: 4

RE: Carriers & Updates
by darknexus on Mon 14th Oct 2013 20:04 UTC in reply to "Carriers & Updates"
darknexus Member since:
2008-07-15

Why don't folks who are always complaining about updates put their money where their mouth is and start buying unlocked phones?

Well, I already do, and I agree. If updates are important to you, and you don't want an iPhone, you damn well should buy your phone unlocked and without carrier influence. Too bad this isn't always easy to do, and I'm not referring to cost. If you're on a US CDMA network (Verizon or Sprint) it's damn hard to directly purchase an unlocked CDMA device without importing it (unless you want an iPhone, then you can just buy it straight from Apple). You can, and the carrier will activate it for you (our CDMA uses non-removeable sim cards) but you'll jump through some hoops to get it. GSM is, of course, simple though you should make sure to get an all-band phone if you can as our GSM providers (AT&T and T-Mobile) differ slightly in the used frequencies for HSDPA.
I have put my money where my mouth is, and will continue to do just that.

Reply Score: 2