Linked by Thom Holwerda on Tue 15th Oct 2013 17:18 UTC
Google

AnandTech has reviewed the new Chromebook 11 from HP/Google.

Chrome OS is extremely purpose built and it is something that should bring about great concern to those at Microsoft. I personally don't have a problem with Windows 8, but purpose built is hardly a phrase that applies to the OS - at least if you're talking about it on a more traditional PC. I suspect by the time we get to Windows 9, Microsoft will have a better answer to the critics of 8/8.1, but that gives Google and its Chrome OS partners at least another year of marketshare erosion. At the beginning of this mobile journey I remember x86 being an advantage for Intel, and we all know what happened to that. Similarly, I remember Windows/Office being advantages for Microsoft. If Microsoft doesn't find a quick solution for making low cost Windows PCs just as well executed as Chrome OS devices, it'll find itself in a world where Windows no longer matters to entry-level/mainstream users.

Apple's taken over the high-end, Google is taking over the low-end, and in mobile, the company barely registers.

Microsoft's next CEO faces a herculean task.

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Comment by Stephen!
by Stephen! on Tue 15th Oct 2013 17:35 UTC
Stephen!
Member since:
2007-11-24

it'll find itself in a world where Windows no longer matters to entry-level/mainstream users


They say that all good things must come to an end.

Although whether Microsoft is considered a good thing is debatable ...

Reply Score: 3

RE: Comment by Stephen!
by darknexus on Tue 15th Oct 2013 17:45 UTC in reply to "Comment by Stephen!"
darknexus Member since:
2008-07-15

[q]it'll find itself in a world where Windows no longer matters to entry-level/mainstream users

Because of ChromeOS? These people have to be joking.

Reply Score: 5

RE[2]: Comment by Stephen!
by vanoff on Tue 15th Oct 2013 17:58 UTC in reply to "RE: Comment by Stephen!"
vanoff Member since:
2008-05-22

Agreed. Windows is still dominating over 80-90% of the desktop OS market. It's not going away any time soon.

Reply Score: 2

RE[3]: Comment by Stephen!
by pooo on Tue 15th Oct 2013 18:18 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Comment by Stephen!"
pooo Member since:
2006-04-22

Your "logic" makes no sense. Just because they hold a large market share doesn't mean they can't lose it. The examples of fallen giants in recent years are many. Remember when Windows Mobile was the dominant handheld/phone os?

Think of it like a sinkhole. On the surface everything looks ok. But beneath the surface the foundation is eroding. Eventually what seems so solid and has stood for so long can collapse very quickly. Things are changing. The foundations MS built it's empire on have changed. They need to change or they will collapse. Thinking otherwise is illogic. I'm not saying they won't do it, I'm just saying it must involve serious change.

Reply Score: 4

RE[4]: Comment by Stephen!
by Deviate_X on Tue 15th Oct 2013 18:40 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: Comment by Stephen!"
Deviate_X Member since:
2005-07-11

Your "logic" makes no sense. Just because they hold a large market share doesn't mean they can't lose it. The examples of fallen giants in recent years are many. Remember when Windows Mobile was the dominant handheld/phone os?

Think of it like a sinkhole. On the surface everything looks ok. But beneath the surface the foundation is eroding. Eventually what seems so solid and has stood for so long can collapse very quickly. Things are changing. The foundations MS built it's empire on have changed. They need to change or they will collapse. Thinking otherwise is illogic. I'm not saying they won't do it, I'm just saying it must involve serious change.


Your point make no sense because its backed by flawed misconceptions. Windows mobile was never dominant in handheld or phone OS'es.

Reply Score: 4

RE[5]: Comment by Stephen!
by pooo on Wed 16th Oct 2013 06:02 UTC in reply to "RE[4]: Comment by Stephen!"
pooo Member since:
2006-04-22

Seriously you dismiss my point because I used windows mobile as an example? Blackberry? You going to dismiss that one also? My larger point stands (and you knew it) because there is more than one great example of seemingly unstoppable brands completely imploding because they didn't adapt to quickly changing realities.

Reply Score: 3

RE[6]: Comment by Stephen!
by ricegf on Wed 16th Oct 2013 11:08 UTC in reply to "RE[5]: Comment by Stephen!"
ricegf Member since:
2007-04-25

Symbian would be a better example to support your point - which was spot on, of course.

"In 2006, Symbian had 73% of the smartphone market, compared with 22.1% of the market in the second quarter of 2011."

Windows on the desktop will likely hang on in business for a few years the way Blackberry did, but unless Microsoft reinvents the OS successfully, it's living on borrowed time IMHO.

Reply Score: 2

RE[4]: Comment by Stephen!
by lucas_maximus on Tue 15th Oct 2013 19:41 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: Comment by Stephen!"
lucas_maximus Member since:
2009-08-18

Why is that then?

* I work in a building with 5 different high end gambling companies ... everything is Windows, except for the designers that are allowed to use Macs.

* All the code that is written is Windows specific or heavily relies on Windows and all our products rely on SQL Server or Oracle. We have a few small web applications that are MariaDB.

* I know 4 people in 1500 that run Linux or some variant.

* Every laptop I see is sold with Windows.

Notebooks and Desktops belong to Microsoft easily for the next ten years.

Microsoft won't continue to be a power necessarily in the consumer space, but in Business they will for a long time. They are the new IBM.

Reply Score: 3

RE[5]: Comment by Stephen!
by ricegf on Wed 16th Oct 2013 11:24 UTC in reply to "RE[4]: Comment by Stephen!"
ricegf Member since:
2007-04-25

Your personal experience in a single building says little about the market (not to question your personal experience, of course).

In contrast, Acer's president, Jim Wang, recently said, "We are trying to grow our non-Windows business as soon as possible. Android is very popular in smartphones and dominant in tablets. I also see a new market there for Chromebooks."

It's just a different opinion, of course, but given his title I tend to give his more weight.

A third take: I see Apple notebooks and Chromebooks quite often now, and support over a thousand Linux workstations (which replaced Windows XP PCs last year) as part of my day job at a Fortune 50 company.

So I don't buy "Notebooks and Desktops belong to Microsoft easily for the next ten years" as necessarily true. If they can reinvent Windows to make sense in the modern heterogeneous world, they might hang on to the desktop for a while longer. But if they continue to alienate their business customers as they did with Windows 8 (and I have yet to talk to any colleague who wants to take their company there any time soon), they'll be the next Nokia.

Reply Score: 2

RE[6]: Comment by Stephen!
by lucas_maximus on Wed 16th Oct 2013 12:53 UTC in reply to "RE[5]: Comment by Stephen!"
lucas_maximus Member since:
2009-08-18

We will see, because I've heard predictions of the death of Microsoft and "we have migrated X many XP machines" comments for the last 10 years on sites such as these.

Personally I don't care one way or another any-more. My skillset isn't tied to .NET (though that is where I have the most experience).

But I've worked both overseas now and in the UK and I haven't even heard any rumblings about moving away from Windows workstations.

The problems with Windows 8, is that Windows 7 was another XP like release. We will hear the same news items we are hearing now about migrating away from Windows 7.

Reply Score: 3

RE[7]: Comment by Stephen!
by ricegf on Wed 16th Oct 2013 17:01 UTC in reply to "RE[6]: Comment by Stephen!"
ricegf Member since:
2007-04-25

Sure, we'll see. But be sure to read what I actually wrote rather than what you perhaps expected to see.

In particular, I did NOT "predict the death of Microsoft"; I pointed that your personal lack of experience seeing non-Windows systems is irrelevant, and that Microsoft's current Windows strategy has been poorly received by large corporations.

Whether they see a market share decline over the next few years among business users depends on their ability to deliver products that add value. Their recent slate of offerings hasn't exactly been received with enthusiasm by the corporate world.

Reply Score: 2

RE[5]: Comment by Stephen!
by Lennie on Wed 16th Oct 2013 16:26 UTC in reply to "RE[4]: Comment by Stephen!"
Lennie Member since:
2007-09-22

"1 in 5 U.S. school districts now using Chromebooks says Google VP"

http://gigaom.com/2013/10/03/1-in-5-u-s-school-districts-now-using-...

Reply Score: 1

RE[3]: Comment by Stephen!
by phoenix on Tue 15th Oct 2013 19:30 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Comment by Stephen!"
phoenix Member since:
2005-07-11

Agreed. Windows is still dominating over 80-90% of the desktop OS market. It's not going away any time soon.


Depends on the market. ;)

Our local school district has under 5% Windows on the desktop (mostly principal laptops with the occasional programming lab configured to dual-boot into Windows). Every other desktop in the district is Linux.

And, there's an initiative underway (without the consent of the IT Dept, I might add) to add 30-60 Chromebooks to each elementary school. That will bring the % of Windows down even further.

We may not be a large district (14,000 students, 2100 staff; ~5000 desktops, several thousand laptops, several hundred tablets), but we have been using alternatives to Windows for over 10 years now. ;)

We've received comments from former students complaining about the use of Windows in the local university, and just how restrictive Windows is. We've also received comments from teachers moving to other districts about how limiting their Windows setups are (no remote access via NX, no access to home directories at other schools via SCP/SFTP, no webmail access, etc).

IOW, don't discount the effects of "the other 10% of the desktop market". ;) We may only have 5,000 desktops, but we've put 20,000+ students through many years of use with lasting, long-term effects that aren't noticed right away. ;)

Reply Score: 3

RE[4]: Comment by Stephen!
by smashIt on Tue 15th Oct 2013 19:47 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: Comment by Stephen!"
smashIt Member since:
2005-07-06

but we have been using alternatives to Windows for over 10 years now. ;)


which leads to the question how well you prepared your pupils for the time after school

Reply Score: 2

RE[5]: Comment by Stephen!
by phoenix on Tue 15th Oct 2013 19:55 UTC in reply to "RE[4]: Comment by Stephen!"
phoenix Member since:
2005-07-11

Very well.

The first couple of years was bumpy as we had to "force" a lot of teachers to stop "teaching" the specific menu locations of things in MS Word, and instead to start teaching concepts like formatting, layout, content, etc. IOW, teaching transferable skills that can be used with any word processing suite, instead of just that one (out-dated) version of MS Word. ;)

Not to mention, they are exposed to a lot more than just Windows + Office. When you get complaints about how limiting the university setup is (they are a 100% Microsoft shop) compared to the K-12 school district, you know you're doing something right!

Reply Score: 7

RE[6]: Comment by Stephen!
by lucas_maximus on Tue 15th Oct 2013 21:02 UTC in reply to "RE[5]: Comment by Stephen!"
lucas_maximus Member since:
2009-08-18

When you get complaints about how limiting the university setup is (they are a 100% Microsoft shop) compared to the K-12 school district, you know you're doing something right!


What you mean exactly, because tbh if anyone are using any of my web-services or databases they are very locked down on what they can do. It would be the same if they were doing anything on a desktop .. no matter the OS.

If they are a PITA that thinks they need special access and has some clout with management, I give them something their own special VM ... and they don't bother me again.

Edited 2013-10-15 21:05 UTC

Reply Score: 2

RE[7]: Comment by Stephen!
by phoenix on Tue 15th Oct 2013 21:11 UTC in reply to "RE[6]: Comment by Stephen!"
phoenix Member since:
2005-07-11

Every student in the district has remote access to their full Linux desktop from home via the NX Client. Nothing similar is available at the uni. Want access to your files on the uni servers? Hope you can find a computer on campus to use.

Want a copy of the software that we use in the schools? No problem, it's all free, and most of it is available on our downloads server; the rest is available on the Internet. Want a copy of the software they use at the uni? Better have a large bank account; even after student discounts, MS Office isn't cheap.

Screw up a file, corrupt a file, misplace a file anytime over the past 3 years? We can recover it from backups (daily snapshots of every server in the district). Lose a file on the uni server? Hope it was in the last 2-4 weeks, otherwise it's gone.

Those are the three biggest complaints we have so far from graduating students. ;) There are others (like the lack of webmail at the uni), but those are the major ones.

Reply Score: 8

RE[6]: Comment by Stephen!
by Bill Shooter of Bul on Tue 15th Oct 2013 21:38 UTC in reply to "RE[5]: Comment by Stephen!"
Bill Shooter of Bul Member since:
2006-07-14

That's very brave. If you do it as well as you say you are, that's awesome. If teach them as well as you did with MS products( like specific menu locations of features), then you're in trouble. Kids today are fairly adept at switching. I'm kind of surprised you got the staff to commit to it. Concepts are more difficult to teach than specific instructions based on menu hierarchy.

Reply Score: 3

RE[3]: Comment by Stephen!
by dsmogor on Tue 15th Oct 2013 20:33 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Comment by Stephen!"
dsmogor Member since:
2005-09-01

Windows will always dominate classical desktop computing. It's just classical desktop computing got embraced and extended by network based computing paradigm centered around web protocols and will soon be relegated to a niche for corporate information workers, engineers etc.

Reply Score: 2

RE[4]: Comment by Stephen!
by lucas_maximus on Tue 15th Oct 2013 21:03 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: Comment by Stephen!"
lucas_maximus Member since:
2009-08-18

Except there are always people needed to make those web based services and they will likely to be using Windows.

Reply Score: 1

RE[5]: Comment by Stephen!
by Shane on Wed 16th Oct 2013 01:06 UTC in reply to "RE[4]: Comment by Stephen!"
Shane Member since:
2005-07-06

Except there are always people needed to make those web based services and they will likely to be using Windows.


Most web based services are likely to be built on top of Unix these days.

Reply Score: 1

RE[6]: Comment by Stephen!
by lucas_maximus on Wed 16th Oct 2013 06:11 UTC in reply to "RE[5]: Comment by Stephen!"
lucas_maximus Member since:
2009-08-18

Debatable.

Doesn't mean they won't be built on Windows either.

Edited 2013-10-16 06:12 UTC

Reply Score: 4

RE[7]: Comment by Stephen!
by Shane on Wed 16th Oct 2013 08:08 UTC in reply to "RE[6]: Comment by Stephen!"
Shane Member since:
2005-07-06

This is why Apple, Google, Amazon, Facebook, Dropbox, and countless others don't build on top of a Microsoft stack:

If you're building something for which you've got great ambitions, you want to build on top of tech that you can take ownership of. Because you might just find yourself competing with Microsoft one day.

On the other hand, if you're building stuff for corporations, knock yourself out.

Reply Score: 3

RE[3]: Comment by Stephen!
by aqd- on Wed 16th Oct 2013 16:50 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Comment by Stephen!"
aqd- Member since:
2009-02-16

If they lose all consumer markets, it won't be long before companies start to take alternatives seriously for future guarantee, after all the entire Windows stack now offers no compelling reason to customers beyond its market share.

It's not difficult to run most of windows business apps on emulation layer, office included. The infrastructure is already there and all it needs is a trigger.

Reply Score: 1

RE[2]: Comment by Stephen!
by cdude on Tue 15th Oct 2013 18:54 UTC in reply to "RE: Comment by Stephen!"
cdude Member since:
2008-09-21

ChromeOS and Android. Its a small step from 10" tablets to laptops.
http://www.pcworld.com/article/2053860/lenovo-shows-android-laptop-...

Reply Score: 2

doubtful
by Kishe on Tue 15th Oct 2013 18:23 UTC
Kishe
Member since:
2006-02-16

ChromeOS is...a glorified web browser.

I dont understand the value of laptops that are of more limited use than tablets.

Considering the value points...who'd buy chromebook over tablet?

Reply Score: 6

RE: doubtful
by moondevil on Tue 15th Oct 2013 19:12 UTC in reply to "doubtful"
moondevil Member since:
2005-07-08

The Reddit and Hacker News crowd

Reply Score: 5

RE: doubtful
by dsmogor on Tue 15th Oct 2013 20:38 UTC in reply to "doubtful"
dsmogor Member since:
2005-09-01

It is horizontally integrated and optimised web browser plus binary extentions, backed by a company that defines modern day computing.
It is not just glorified browser but glorified IE when it was strongest.

Reply Score: 3

RE: doubtful
by No it isnt on Tue 15th Oct 2013 20:43 UTC in reply to "doubtful"
No it isnt Member since:
2005-11-14

It's not more limited than a tablet. You can use it for most tasks that need a keyboard (writing) and upload your work to a server (the cloud or whatever). The actual computing happens elsewhere. Microsoft's real concern should be that Chromebooks could make Office redundant as well.

A tablet isn't even good for its main purpose: browsing the web. Only a few Apple fanboys use them for actual work, and only because they really really want to, not because it's suited for it at all.

Reply Score: 1

RE: doubtful
by Flatland_Spider on Tue 15th Oct 2013 20:50 UTC in reply to "doubtful"
Flatland_Spider Member since:
2006-09-01

ChromeOS is...a glorified web browser.


That Google is turning into a full fledged runtime environment.

Once people buy into the Chrome App ecosystem they don't need Windows, Linux, or whatever. They just need Chrome, and what better way to run Chrome then an operating system dedicated to Chrome?

Reply Score: 2

RE: doubtful
by Bill Shooter of Bul on Tue 15th Oct 2013 21:41 UTC in reply to "doubtful"
Bill Shooter of Bul Member since:
2006-07-14

Considering the value points...who'd buy chromebook over tablet?

The chromebook has a nice always attached Keyboard. Somethings are still easier with one. Google office has come a long way. On a good computer, I can barely tell the difference in speed between it and open office.

Reply Score: 2

RE[2]: doubtful
by darknexus on Wed 16th Oct 2013 00:19 UTC in reply to "RE: doubtful"
darknexus Member since:
2008-07-15

Google office has come a long way. On a good computer, I can barely tell the difference in speed between it and open office.

If you don't mind Google indexing everything you write, that is.

Reply Score: 3

RE[3]: doubtful
by lucas0 on Wed 16th Oct 2013 07:48 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: doubtful"
lucas0 Member since:
2012-04-20

Like Microsoft doesn't spy you..
They all do. You can't trust closed source software no matter who made it.

Reply Score: 2

RE[3]: doubtful
by Bill Shooter of Bul on Wed 16th Oct 2013 14:22 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: doubtful"
Bill Shooter of Bul Member since:
2006-07-14

Well, if we're comparing an Android tablet to a chromebook here. There is no difference in google indexing between the two. Providing the comparison to open office speed was only meant to support the idea that having a keyboard is useful.

I suppose if you are comparing a netbook running anything other than chrome os to a chromebook, then google indexing becomes something to think about. Perhaps its an argument to replace Chrome os with something like Fedora ( which is supposedly in the works even for the arm based ones). In fact, getting back to the original point, the ability to run a traditional Linux Distro ( excluding ubuntu touch which is kind of flaky), would be another reason to get a chromebook over a tablet.

Reply Score: 2

RE: doubtful
by Wondercool on Tue 15th Oct 2013 22:00 UTC in reply to "doubtful"
Wondercool Member since:
2005-07-08

Chrome is pretty ok for most people who only need a browser and a keyboard.

For me personally it's even better: I replaced ChromeOS with XUbuntu. Those Chromebooks don't come with Microsoft OS tax and the price point is brilliant.

I used to have Samsung NC20 11" netbook type computer.
Cost me 300 euro 4 years ago. Was quite slow and did not play games.
I replaced it with a 170 euro 11" acer C7 Chromebook 6 months ago. It is insanely good for the money. I put on Ubuntu (http://chromeos-cr48.blogspot.ie/) and I can even play Portal or most Steam Linux games!

And now the Haswell version is out! I will never go back to if the hardware is this good for 170 euro

Granted I am not sure if the ARM based Chromebooks run linux (probably yes) but the Celeron based Acer is fantastic

Edited 2013-10-15 22:01 UTC

Reply Score: 0

RE[2]: doubtful
by Thom_Holwerda on Tue 15th Oct 2013 23:02 UTC in reply to "RE: doubtful"
Thom_Holwerda Member since:
2005-06-29

Can you put Ubuntu on the ARM version as well?

Reply Score: 1

RE[3]: doubtful
by pilotgi on Tue 15th Oct 2013 23:23 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: doubtful"
pilotgi Member since:
2005-07-06

Can you put Ubuntu on the ARM version as well?

openSUSE has an ARM version of their distro.

Reply Score: 2

RE[3]: doubtful
by Wondercool on Wed 16th Oct 2013 11:24 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: doubtful"
Wondercool Member since:
2005-07-08
RE[3]: doubtful
by Lennie on Wed 16th Oct 2013 16:38 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: doubtful"
Lennie Member since:
2007-09-22

Yes, I use that. I'm happy with it.

The only annoying thing is you have to press a key to enter the 'developer mode' at startup. If you get it wrong, it will do a restore (which takes more than 15 minutes I believe) and you'll have to get it back in developer mode (takes a few steps) and make the Linux desktop partition the default boot partition again.

And the keyboard doesn't have all the normal keys. I would have liked some more keys, maybe I should take the time to look into more keyboard mappings.

Everything else works great, it's just a little ARM dual-boot netbook/laptop (ChromeOS and desktop Linux) for about 300 euros (includes shipping from Amazon.co.uk).

Because I bought mine from the UK, I needed to replace the plug of the power supply.

Edited 2013-10-16 16:51 UTC

Reply Score: 2

RE[2]: doubtful
by ricegf on Wed 16th Oct 2013 10:51 UTC in reply to "RE: doubtful"
ricegf Member since:
2007-04-25

Granted I am not sure if the ARM based Chromebooks run linux (probably yes) but the Celeron based Acer is fantastic


Google Crouton. Not only do ARM based Chromebooks run more traditional Linux environments, but they can do so simultaneously - e.g., switch between Chrome OS and Ubuntu with a hotkey, using the same kernel, with no reboots.

My son does this, using Chrome OS as his browser and Ubuntu for his homework as a senior in Computer Science at the local university. I'm very tempted by the HP Chromebook as a result.

It's brilliant, really, IMHO.

Reply Score: 1

RE: doubtful
by chithanh on Tue 15th Oct 2013 22:02 UTC in reply to "doubtful"
chithanh Member since:
2006-06-18

Considering the value points...who'd buy chromebook over tablet?
A Chromebook can do a few things better than a tablet, mostly things that use keyboard input. A tablet + keyboard will cost much more than a Chromebook of similar screen size and still perform worse at these tasks.

Plus, the Chromebook is automatically sync'ed into the cloud. And you can share many Chromebooks between many users, which is an important selling point for schools.

Reply Score: 2

RE: doubtful
by Gone fishing on Wed 16th Oct 2013 05:31 UTC in reply to "doubtful"
Gone fishing Member since:
2006-02-22

isn't one of the reasons MS destroyed Netscape is that they could see that a browsers could become a fully fledged platform - an OS and a threat to Windows?

The open-sourcing of Netscape to become Mozilla and Google's Chrome browsers show that MS was right. Now we have increasingly powerful tools to make Browser based applications, cloud computing etc. I'd be worried if I was MS.

To say that MS will still be dominate in desktop computing in 10 years (and this will be important)seems to me to be a very bold statement, which, would require a very reliable crystal ball - I don't have one.

Reply Score: 2

Good review
by tkeith on Tue 15th Oct 2013 18:49 UTC
tkeith
Member since:
2010-09-01

Nice review, it seems to contradict a lot of other sites on some things, except for the slow part. I suppose Samsung wouldn't sell HP a newer chip? Sad that the hardware is almost getting back to where the CR-48 was, but it has the same problem, a slow processor. Can't wait to see how the other new chromebooks stack up, I'm thinking of getting one for my kids.

Reply Score: 2

Comment by shmerl
by shmerl on Tue 15th Oct 2013 21:17 UTC
shmerl
Member since:
2010-06-08

Does Chrome OS use regular X.org (Wayland?) and other conventional Linux stack? I.e. can you run native Linux applications there, for example games?

Edited 2013-10-15 21:19 UTC

Reply Score: 2

RE: Comment by shmerl
by chithanh on Tue 15th Oct 2013 22:08 UTC in reply to "Comment by shmerl"
chithanh Member since:
2006-06-18

ChomeOS uses X. In the default configuration you can install only Chrome packaged HTML5 apps.

In developer mode, you gain access to the ChromeOS package manager (Gentoo portage) which allows you to install other packages in Gentoo's ebuild format. Besides you can create a Linux chroot like the popular Crouton. Crouton gives you an Ubuntu environment which allows you to install arbitrary Ubuntu packages.

Reply Score: 1

allanregistos
Member since:
2011-02-10

Microsoft Needs to offer Windows OS as a free download.
If MS needs to secure the future years of computing. What matters today is the app (software) that will run on top of a platform. And that platform must be free.

Reply Score: 1

Lennie Member since:
2007-09-22

Microsoft biggest cash cows on the desktop are: Windows and Office.

With Google Docs offered for free and their plans to add more office compatibility to their offerings.

Officering Windows for free... might not be such a great idea.

Actually on the server side, Microsoft did the opposite and made Windows more expensive (there are more VM's these days, so people run less machines):
http://www.vladanseget.com/windows-server-2012-r2-28-percent-more-e...

People buy a single machine license for the host and don't have to pay for the individual VMs).

Reply Score: 3

What a nice conversation
by poliorcetes on Wed 16th Oct 2013 09:09 UTC
poliorcetes
Member since:
2009-05-06

You people have summarize a good number of the intervening dynamics that are shaping the computer world of tomorrow. Yes, I'm serious about that

Most of the people don't take chromeOS seriously, and indeed it is a very focused and limited offering for non-hacker users. But you can do actual work with it and web platforms and tools, what you cannot do with an Android platform and its limited browser or docs client. I've tried to work with google docs in Android for years and it is still frustrating (it doesn't cover sections, for instance, and the spreadsheet client is still quite crappy and unresponsive).

In fact, Ms. was quite fear of what netscape's thin client promised. ChromeOS is the ultimate refination of such concept. It's not going to substitute windows, but the menace, as another fellow said, is against office too. What they really want is that both final and corporate users stay on their ecosystem as much as possible, and they are making advances on it. Although they are not playing well with corporate users (hello patriot act, which denies the possibility of use google drive to a large number of non-american corporations and agencies), a damn lot of final users are turning on their windows, osx or whatever and running chrome with chrome apps.

Actually next Ms CEO has an herculean task. Given that IE11 cannot work seamessly with google docs, for instance, it's a great opportunity for further advances of chrome inside Ms core territory

Reply Score: 2