Linked by Thom Holwerda on Wed 13th Nov 2013 10:55 UTC, submitted by MOS6510
Apple

The Computer History Museum (CHM) announced today that it has, with the collaboration of the Digibarn Computer Museum and with permission from Apple Inc., posted the historic original 1978 source code for the Apple II DOS "Disk Operating System."

Pretty cool. More on the Apple II can be found at the Computer History Museum's blog.

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Hehehe !
by Kochise on Wed 13th Nov 2013 11:10 UTC
Kochise
Member since:
2006-03-03

Now let's return back in time, spoof Apple before Apple, hire Woz and Jobs and rewrite history !

Dr Devil

Edited 2013-11-13 11:11 UTC

Reply Score: 2

RE: Hehehe !
by Bill Shooter of Bul on Wed 13th Nov 2013 16:20 UTC in reply to "Hehehe !"
Bill Shooter of Bul Member since:
2006-07-14

Ugh, I can't imagine having to have Jobs as an employee back in the days when he was only eating fruit, not bathing, back stabbing ( see the atari incident with the breakout bonuses), and arrogant as hell. I'd much rather work for him than visa versa.

Reply Score: 4

RE[2]: Hehehe !
by phoudoin on Wed 13th Nov 2013 17:28 UTC in reply to "RE: Hehehe !"
phoudoin Member since:
2006-06-09

What!? And miss an unique occasion to be the second one *ever* to have the pleasure to fire Steve Jobs from Apple!?

Noway. Gimme that time machine right now!
;-)

Reply Score: 3

RE[3]: Hehehe !
by Bill Shooter of Bul on Wed 13th Nov 2013 20:08 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Hehehe !"
Bill Shooter of Bul Member since:
2006-07-14

You'd have to put up with him for a little time between the interview and the firing, in order for it to really count as a fire rather than a not hire. That's not worth it.

I'd rather deal with him when he was a little more manageable, say with NeXT.

Reply Score: 3

RE[2]: Hehehe !
by Alfman on Wed 13th Nov 2013 19:50 UTC in reply to "RE: Hehehe !"
Alfman Member since:
2011-01-28
RE[2]: Hehehe !
by Kivada on Thu 14th Nov 2013 02:24 UTC in reply to "RE: Hehehe !"
Kivada Member since:
2010-07-07

Ugh, I can't imagine having to have Jobs as an employee back in the days when he was only eating fruit, not bathing, back stabbing ( see the atari incident with the breakout bonuses), and arrogant as hell. I'd much rather work for him than visa versa.


Be more fun to just mess around with history and do what we did to a friend of mine who went 3 weeks without bathing, jump him with a bottle of dish soap and a garden hose with Woz.

Reply Score: 3

RE[2]: Hehehe !
by leech on Thu 14th Nov 2013 03:36 UTC in reply to "RE: Hehehe !"
leech Member since:
2006-01-10

Ugh, I can't imagine having to have Jobs as an employee back in the days when he was only eating fruit, not bathing, back stabbing ( see the atari incident with the breakout bonuses), and arrogant as hell. I'd much rather work for him than visa versa.


Would have been more interesting (and probably game changing) if someone had talked Nolan Bushnell into not selling Atari to a bunch of morons that caused the great video game crash.

Who knows, maybe we would all be using Atari or Microsoft products instead of Apple and Microsoft. The Amiga probably would have been owned by Atari as well (seeing as how Jay Miner left Atari because they wouldn't see toward the future and allow him to develop based on the Motorola 68000. The way early Atari was, I think all the early engineers were encouraged to do what they do best, engineer things!)

There are definitely a lot of what ifs.

So the real question for this topic... is there anything useful in this source? Or at least something to say to modern software engineers "let's don't or do follow what went down so long ago..."?

Reply Score: 3

RE[3]: Hehehe !
by Lorin on Thu 14th Nov 2013 05:03 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Hehehe !"
Lorin Member since:
2010-04-06

Could be useful if any of it can be used to prove prior art and kill a few more Microsoft patents.

Reply Score: 0

RE[4]: Hehehe !
by Alfman on Thu 14th Nov 2013 06:21 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: Hehehe !"
Alfman Member since:
2011-01-28

Lorin,

"Could be useful if any of it can be used to prove prior art and kill a few more Microsoft patents."

It's very unlikely there is anything there that's both relevant and doesn't already have prior art elsewhere. But hypothetically yes. Theoretically it could even invalidate apple's patents too.

http://www.macnn.com/articles/13/09/27/jobs.himself.showed.off.tech...

Reply Score: 0

v RE[5]: Hehehe !
by Alfman on Thu 14th Nov 2013 15:44 UTC in reply to "RE[4]: Hehehe !"
RE[4]: Hehehe !
by Kochise on Thu 14th Nov 2013 06:25 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: Hehehe !"
Kochise Member since:
2006-03-03

Patent Slayers arise !

Kochise

Reply Score: 1

RE: Hehehe !
by Alfman on Wed 13th Nov 2013 18:04 UTC in reply to "Hehehe !"
Alfman Member since:
2011-01-28

Kochise,

If you could only pick one of the two, wouldn't you choose woz?

Reply Score: 4

RE[2]: Hehehe !
by Bill Shooter of Bul on Wed 13th Nov 2013 20:09 UTC in reply to "RE: Hehehe !"
Bill Shooter of Bul Member since:
2006-07-14

Well, I'd hire Woz with a strict no flying planes section in his contract.

Reply Score: 3

RE[2]: Hehehe !
by Kochise on Wed 13th Nov 2013 20:49 UTC in reply to "RE: Hehehe !"
Kochise Member since:
2006-03-03

It's a matter of alchemy I bet. You cannot get Apple without one of its component : Woz as hardware and software designer, Jobs as envisioning leader. See Apple when Jobs was fired : Apple declined with no vision, Next was pretty good with some other pretty good techies but no Wozniak in sight.

I really think that one of the main talent of Jobs : finding the right profiles to do the jobs... <- pun intended !

Another one I see similar in vision, but more versatile in products, is Sir Richard Branson.

Kochise

Reply Score: 3

RE[3]: Hehehe !
by Lennie on Thu 14th Nov 2013 10:09 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Hehehe !"
Lennie Member since:
2007-09-22

Gabe Newell from Valve also seems to be a man with the plan.

No idea if it works out, but you can't be successful with at least some ideas:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Td_PGkfIdIQ
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jhgOqyZHBIU

Reply Score: 2

RE: Hehehe !
by twitterfire on Thu 14th Nov 2013 07:42 UTC in reply to "Hehehe !"
twitterfire Member since:
2008-09-11

Now let's return back in time, spoof Apple before Apple, hire Woz and Jobs and rewrite history !

Dr Devil


I'd rather return back in time, spoof Be Inc., hire Jean-Louis Gassée and make BeOS big!

I like that OS much more than any OS Apple has made, including latest Os X.

Reply Score: 1

RE[2]: Hehehe !
by Kochise on Thu 14th Nov 2013 09:06 UTC in reply to "RE: Hehehe !"
Kochise Member since:
2006-03-03

Please note : Apple II had no floating point support, BeOS had no network stack (before Dano)

Both OS were lacking of a major feature by their time ;)

Kochise

Reply Score: 1

RE[3]: Hehehe !
by Ithamar on Thu 14th Nov 2013 10:04 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Hehehe !"
Ithamar Member since:
2006-03-20

Please note : Apple II had no floating point support, BeOS had no network stack (before Dano)


BeOS did have a network stack, just not in its kernel, which was what Dano introduced...

Reply Score: 3

RE[2]: Hehehe !
by Soulbender on Thu 14th Nov 2013 12:07 UTC in reply to "RE: Hehehe !"
Soulbender Member since:
2005-08-18

hire Jean-Louis Gassée and make BeOS big!


Maybe *not* hire JLG then ;)

Reply Score: 3

can i finally run Broderbund software?
by ezraz on Thu 14th Nov 2013 16:53 UTC
ezraz
Member since:
2012-06-20

How about PFS:Write (maybe that was atari?.

The amount of brain ram i've used to hold computer knowledge since 1985 is intense. I wouldn't be surprised if I started up and launched my 25 years old boxes and remembered passwords and logins.

I mean I hope I wouldn't - but it would be an interesting test. Could you log into your 80's or 90's systems right now?

I have an Atari 130xe from 86 that will still run, with floppy drive and atari-basic. That thing didn't even have passwords. But when I got 1200 baud I went on early 1986 internet, that was probably my first password.

Awwww, my first password, my first security baby...

haha just realized that my first stop on the freenet in 86 was browsing and posting on a library server in northern europe. here i am 27 years later on OSNews, almost the same thing.

nerd question - what baud am i connected at now? i have 25 Mbps into my pad. someone do the translation for me plz

Edited 2013-11-14 16:59 UTC

Reply Score: 1

benytocamela Member since:
2013-05-16


nerd question - what baud am i connected at now? i have 25 Mbps into my pad. someone do the translation for me plz



That would be equivalent to a 24414 KBaud modem. Basically over 435 times faster than an old 56K modem

Reply Score: 2

ezraz Member since:
2012-06-20

"
nerd question - what baud am i connected at now? i have 25 Mbps into my pad. someone do the translation for me plz



That would be equivalent to a 24414 KBaud modem. Basically over 435 times faster than an old 56K modem
"


cool thanks. i've gone from 300 to 24,414k baud. 83x improvement. my very first (gifted) modem had the cradle, aw yeah!

imagine waiting 25 minutes to download 60 seconds of useless video, we would have so much less useless video

Reply Score: 1

Doc Pain Member since:
2006-10-08

Could you log into your 80's or 90's systems right now?


Definitely - as a person suffering from an eidetic memory it's not really a big challenge. :-)

I have an Atari 130xe from 86 that will still run, with floppy drive and atari-basic. That thing didn't even have passwords. But when I got 1200 baud I went on early 1986 internet, that was probably my first password.


Getting programs running with "cryptic commands and computer gibberish" was probably that time's home computer password lookalike. I have an Atari 800 XL (among many other technology from the "stone age" of IT where IT wasn't even called IT) which is still fully functional. I'd be interested on how much of today's "modern" technology would still work in 10, 20, or 50 years, and if people living then would still be able to operate it - I mean, without holographic control, voice input and brain plug. :-)

haha just realized that my first stop on the freenet in 86 was browsing and posting on a library server in northern europe. here i am 27 years later on OSNews, almost the same thing.


Some things never change:

http://www.masswerk.at/googleBBS/

Or if you are totally insane:

http://www.masswerk.at/google60/

This meets my preferences a bit more than "cheap stuff you can have at home". :-)

nerd question - what baud am i connected at now? i have 25 Mbps into my pad. someone do the translation for me plz


You have of course infite baud because you use a modern consumer device, and everyone knows they're wireless and therefore unlimited. :-)

Reply Score: 2

ezraz Member since:
2012-06-20

Those links are amazing -- I love the old Google's!

I remember the 80's version, of course, not of google, but that was like gopher servers, very cool.

The 60's version was awesome too - I've read some books about 60's computing and that was about the closest I've come to actually operating one of those beasts!

thanks for the links, very cool.


"Could you log into your 80's or 90's systems right now?


Definitely - as a person suffering from an eidetic memory it's not really a big challenge. :-)

I have an Atari 130xe from 86 that will still run, with floppy drive and atari-basic. That thing didn't even have passwords. But when I got 1200 baud I went on early 1986 internet, that was probably my first password.


Getting programs running with "cryptic commands and computer gibberish" was probably that time's home computer password lookalike. I have an Atari 800 XL (among many other technology from the "stone age" of IT where IT wasn't even called IT) which is still fully functional. I'd be interested on how much of today's "modern" technology would still work in 10, 20, or 50 years, and if people living then would still be able to operate it - I mean, without holographic control, voice input and brain plug. :-)

haha just realized that my first stop on the freenet in 86 was browsing and posting on a library server in northern europe. here i am 27 years later on OSNews, almost the same thing.


Some things never change:

http://www.masswerk.at/googleBBS/

Or if you are totally insane:

http://www.masswerk.at/google60/

This meets my preferences a bit more than "cheap stuff you can have at home". :-)

nerd question - what baud am i connected at now? i have 25 Mbps into my pad. someone do the translation for me plz


You have of course infite baud because you use a modern consumer device, and everyone knows they're wireless and therefore unlimited. :-)
"

Reply Score: 1

Comment by MOS6510
by MOS6510 on Fri 15th Nov 2013 07:10 UTC
MOS6510
Member since:
2011-05-12

I would be great to build a hardware emulator of the Apple ][.

Most software was pretty small, certainly by today's standards. You could fit a HUGE amount of applications on a single SD card.

My Commodore 128 reads software from an SD card and it's great.

Reply Score: 2