Linked by Thom Holwerda on Thu 21st Nov 2013 18:41 UTC, submitted by MOS6510
Windows

The big story in The New York Times on November 20, 1985, concerned Hurricane Kate's advance as it smashed into northern Cuba and the Florida Keys before barreling north to threaten the Gulf Coast. But another big story -- for the technology world -- was about to unfold thousands of miles away in Las Vegas, where the Comdex trade show was getting under way.

Apple had grabbed headlines a year earlier with the introduction of its graphical Macintosh. Now, after two years of delays, Microsoft was finally ready to debut the much-promised Microsoft Windows.

It became the blueprint for many of Microsoft's new product launches. Early versions suck, but get progressively better over the years.

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Is there hope?
by dmrio on Thu 21st Nov 2013 19:14 UTC
dmrio
Member since:
2005-08-26

Early versions suck, but get progressively better over the years.


I believe Windows RT is an exception to this rule.

Reply Score: 6

RE: Is there hope?
by Brunis on Thu 21st Nov 2013 19:34 UTC in reply to "Is there hope?"
Brunis Member since:
2005-11-01

Early versions suck, but get progressively better over the years.


I believe Windows RT is an exception to this rule.


I believe you are deluding yourself!

Reply Score: 1

RE[2]: Is there hope?
by dmrio on Thu 21st Nov 2013 20:29 UTC in reply to "RE: Is there hope?"
dmrio Member since:
2005-08-26

No, I'm just saying Windows RT don't have a future, so it's an exception to the "rule".

Reply Score: 5

RE[3]: Is there hope?
by No it isnt on Thu 21st Nov 2013 20:50 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Is there hope?"
No it isnt Member since:
2005-11-14

It depends. If Microsoft perseveres, it might still suck in the future.

Reply Score: 9

RE[4]: Is there hope?
by WorknMan on Thu 21st Nov 2013 21:52 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: Is there hope?"
WorknMan Member since:
2005-11-13

It depends. If Microsoft perseveres, it might still suck in the future.


LOL, well... you look at Windows 1.0 and where the OS is now, and it's quite a big leap. Who knows what RT will be like 10 years from now, which I imagine is the MINIMUM amount of time it will take before any self-respecting power user will go anywhere near it.

Reply Score: 2

RE[5]: Is there hope?
by MOS6510 on Thu 21st Nov 2013 22:04 UTC in reply to "RE[4]: Is there hope?"
MOS6510 Member since:
2011-05-12

I think 10 years isn't what 10 years used to be 10 years ago.

Products need to be instant hits these days and if they are not they are labeled a "flop" almost immediately. From then on a product not only needs to improve, but also shake its damaged image.

Windows RT not only has to show it has become better, it also has prove beyond any reasonable and even unreasonable doubt that it doesn't suck like it did before and if one or two (small) things do suck it gets another "flop" sticker.

Will Microsoft then continue to improve or start with a clean slate? In a way what they did with Windows Mobile 6 -> Windows Phone 7 -> Windows Phone 8.

Reply Score: 3

RE[6]: Is there hope?
by WorknMan on Thu 21st Nov 2013 22:57 UTC in reply to "RE[5]: Is there hope?"
WorknMan Member since:
2005-11-13

I don't know, but if they can improve it to the point where tech tards like using it, then they have a stable base to improve upon.

Reply Score: 1

RE[7]: Is there hope?
by MOS6510 on Thu 21st Nov 2013 23:07 UTC in reply to "RE[6]: Is there hope?"
MOS6510 Member since:
2011-05-12

The PC invaded homes from work replacing the home computer, because people wanted to do at home what they did at work.

Now the iPad invaded work from home, because people wanted to use it at work.

I think Windows tablets have a chance if they prove their value in the working environment and people take them from there to home. If you already have a Windows tablet, do you need another one too?

An iPad is great, but I think it's designed for consumer use and not to be used in a business environment. If I used a tablet at/for work I'd want it to easily access the file server for example, open files in Microsoft Office and save them back to the file server. This is not easy with an iPad.

Give me a tablet that connect with the corporate network, VPN or local WiFi, and becomes a full member. Acces to all the recourses and files.

Reply Score: 3

RE[5]: Is there hope?
by phoenix on Sat 23rd Nov 2013 00:31 UTC in reply to "RE[4]: Is there hope?"
phoenix Member since:
2005-07-11

No, you were on the right track with the evolutionary dead-end.

Windows 1.0 eventually became Windows 9x which became Windows ME and then died out.

Windows NT eventually became Windows XP which is now Windows 7 (there is no other OS after that).

In the same vein, Windows RT is like Windows 1.0. It will probably last 10 years, but will eventually be abondanded, just as the Windows 1.x-9x line did.

:)

Reply Score: 0

Comment by MOS6510
by MOS6510 on Thu 21st Nov 2013 20:23 UTC
MOS6510
Member since:
2011-05-12

Most version 1 products sucked.

Apple TV for example, 2nd and 3rd generation are still updated, but the first not anymore since a long time. The first iPhone and iPad were either lacking features or got obsoleted much quicker than following generations.

First Android phone.

Linux sucked for some time.

I guess every version 1 (Windows, Linux, Android) sucked either from the start or when compared to 2nd and following generations (iPad, iPhone, Apple TV).

To be successful in this business you need a long breath (==money) and figure out the weaknesses in your product and fix them.

With Windows Microsoft took a very long time to get things right. Even though version 3 brought them success, it still sucked. Windows 3.11 and Windows 2000 were some bright spots I guess, but Windows 7 (or perhaps Vista + service packs) was the first Windows version that didn't suck. And then they released Windows 8!!!

Reply Score: 2

RE: Comment by MOS6510
by moondevil on Thu 21st Nov 2013 22:42 UTC in reply to "Comment by MOS6510"
moondevil Member since:
2005-07-08

Linux sucked for some time.


Still does if you are heavy into multimedia, 3D and mobile computing.

That is why I keep it for server side development and my little netbook.

My main laptop uses Windows 7 and I was a Linux Journal subscriber from 1995 until 2004.

Reply Score: 4

RE[2]: Comment by MOS6510
by MOS6510 on Thu 21st Nov 2013 22:45 UTC in reply to "RE: Comment by MOS6510"
MOS6510 Member since:
2011-05-12

Indeed, but I consider Linux only for a server OS or to play around with. For those 2 things it is great.

I'm trying to replace the hard disk of my Windows 7 laptop with a SSD. Making an image was easy, putting it back not so. Oh well.

Reply Score: 2

RE[3]: Comment by MOS6510
by andih on Sat 23rd Nov 2013 14:28 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Comment by MOS6510"
andih Member since:
2010-03-27

Indeed, but I consider Linux only for a server OS or to play around with. For those 2 things it is great.


What, linux to play around with?

MOS6510, you are missing out on something truly awesome man!

I have used linux as my only OS for ages. At work, at home, for play, fun, work anything. And I do not miss microsoft at all.

I work as a systems and network administrator, so no need for microsoft office or other proprietary bull ;)

Reply Score: 3

RE[4]: Comment by MOS6510
by MOS6510 on Sat 23rd Nov 2013 15:06 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: Comment by MOS6510"
MOS6510 Member since:
2011-05-12

Don´t panic, I´m an experienced Linux user!

I know how to use it for all kinds of serious things, but for me the fun in Linux is doing the non-serious things. Even things without purpose, just to see if it´s possible.

Like I once spend a lot of time recompiling the kernel to make it as small as possible and having as many things I did need as modules. Of course I ended up with an unbootable system, but it was an educational experience to get it working again too.

Reply Score: 2

RE[4]: Comment by MOS6510
by moondevil on Sat 23rd Nov 2013 16:09 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: Comment by MOS6510"
moondevil Member since:
2005-07-08

I have used linux as my only OS for ages. At work, at home, for play, fun, work anything. And I do not miss microsoft at all.


Do you contribute back?

Edited 2013-11-23 16:10 UTC

Reply Score: 2

RE[2]: Comment by MOS6510
by tylerdurden on Thu 21st Nov 2013 22:47 UTC in reply to "RE: Comment by MOS6510"
tylerdurden Member since:
2009-03-17


Still does if you are heavy into multimedia, 3D and mobile computing.


You have to define a bit more what you mean by any of those terms. My linux laptop and android phone happily perform as well as any other system in any of those 3 areas you mentioned, and do so with plenty of mobility. But then again, I wasn't subscribed to Linux Journal so who knows...

Reply Score: 3

RE[3]: Comment by MOS6510
by moondevil on Fri 22nd Nov 2013 06:00 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Comment by MOS6510"
moondevil Member since:
2005-07-08

Like 3D programming using OpenGL 3.x and 4.x/OpenCL/Cuda with proper drivers.

Using Unity.

Doing video manipulation work.

Having a OS that can hibernate properly and make use of the wireless card.

The remark about Linux Journal was to point out that I am not a Linux newbie and am fully aware of OSS since 1995, but eventually gave up.

Reply Score: 3

RE[4]: Comment by MOS6510
by lucas_maximus on Fri 22nd Nov 2013 10:06 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: Comment by MOS6510"
lucas_maximus Member since:
2009-08-18

The remark about Linux Journal was to point out that I am not a Linux newbie and am fully aware of OSS since 1995, but eventually gave up.


That generally how I feel. A lot of stuff has been broken for almost a decade or someone reinvents the wheel for the sake of it.

Reply Score: 3

RE[4]: Comment by MOS6510
by tylerdurden on Fri 22nd Nov 2013 17:58 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: Comment by MOS6510"
tylerdurden Member since:
2009-03-17

Like 3D programming using OpenGL 3.x and 4.x/OpenCL/Cuda with proper drivers.


Technically OpenCL/CUDA isn't 3D Programming (whatever that means), but at least from NVIDIA's perspective their drivers for GPU compute support for linux are pretty much on par with their windows counterparts. In fact, you'd be surprised if you were to find out what OS most of the CUDA dev team machines runs ;-). The larger scale deployments of CUDA tend to be on linux clusters interestingly enough.

Windows does have DirectX, which depending on one's perspective may be a value added that Linux lacks. As far as OpenGL, again speaking from NVIDIA's perspective, both Windows and Linux drivers are pretty much on par (4.4), in this regard the OS clearly lagging behind is OSX.


Using Unity.


I assume that's a specific game engine, is that correct? If there is an app your livelihood depends on, which is not available for a specific platform it makes sense to ignore that platform.

Doing video manipulation work.

That is more of an issue with the Software vendors not supporting a specific platform, not a shortcoming of the platform itself. Yeah, Avid, Smoke, Premiere, or Final Cut do not run on linux. I think Lightworks is about to be released for Linux though. There are a bunch of FOSS video editing apps, which may not be suitable for professional production work but seem to cut it alright for personal use (in my experience at least).


Having a OS that can hibernate properly and make use of the wireless card.


Again, my work laptop running linux has absolutely no issue with any of that. I have had issues where windows was unstable in some HW platforms, but I assumed a couple of personal data points were not enough to extrapolate to the entirety of the Windows ecosystem.

Reply Score: 3

RE[5]: Comment by MOS6510
by lucas_maximus on Fri 22nd Nov 2013 18:10 UTC in reply to "RE[4]: Comment by MOS6510"
lucas_maximus Member since:
2009-08-18

Again, my work laptop running linux has absolutely no issue with any of that. I have had issues where windows was unstable in some HW platforms, but I assumed a couple of personal data points were not enough to extrapolate to the entirety of the Windows ecosystem.


I will make the bet that your work laptop is a business class laptop and has an Intel chipset, because that is the only way to guarantee that Linux will work well on a laptop.

If you don't have that ... good luck because it all off-road from there.

Reply Score: 3

RE[6]: Comment by MOS6510
by tylerdurden on Fri 22nd Nov 2013 19:31 UTC in reply to "RE[5]: Comment by MOS6510"
tylerdurden Member since:
2009-03-17


I will make the bet that your work laptop is a business class laptop and has an Intel chipset, because that is the only way to guarantee that Linux will work well on a laptop.


Yeah, but that's true for any system; OSes tend to run best on HW they support properly. RTFM is a wonderful thing and saves much time and effort in the tech field.

I can understand the frustration if one has some random laptop (purchased for other original purpose/intent) laying around and wants to try out Linux on a whim, only to find out the HW is not supported properly. But using that as an indictment against the entire system would be as odd as me claiming how Windows 8 still does not scale properly because I couldn't even get it to boot on my Raspberry Pi.

Edit to add: There are also flaws on any system. Linux distros will foobar things and drivers every now and then. But so does windows as well, for example we can revisit the debacle which were the graphics drivers on Vista's early days. Now, if Linux is not the right tool for someone, then they should not use it nor waste time with it.

Edited 2013-11-22 19:42 UTC

Reply Score: 2

RE[7]: Comment by MOS6510
by lucas_maximus on Fri 22nd Nov 2013 22:07 UTC in reply to "RE[6]: Comment by MOS6510"
lucas_maximus Member since:
2009-08-18

Yeah, but that's true for any system; OSes tend to run best on HW they support properly. RTFM is a wonderful thing and saves much time and effort in the tech field.


RTFM is not something that normal people should need to do or want to do. It is failing of the system if it requires a user to do that.

In fact I shouldn't need to do it either. The system should work for me ... not the other way around.

I can understand the frustration if one has some random laptop (purchased for other original purpose/intent) laying around and wants to try out Linux on a whim, only to find out the HW is not supported properly. But using that as an indictment against the entire system would be as odd as me claiming how Windows 8 still does not scale properly because I couldn't even get it to boot on my Raspberry Pi.


It is an indictment against the entire system because, it shows that it just isn't mature enough to be used effectively by people that aren't savvy unless it is significantly abstracted away (android is the perfect example).

Gnome and friends can talk all they like about HID guidelines and the ilk, but if people can't actually do stuff with it without mucking about it is essentially useless for the majority of the population.

Linux has always succeeded on servers and embedded (I consider Android sufficiently locked down to be called embedded) because what we know as Linux is abstracted away from the user.

I dunno why this is so hard to grok.

Edit to add: There are also flaws on any system. Linux distros will foobar things and drivers every now and then. But so does windows as well, for example we can revisit the debacle which were the graphics drivers on Vista's early days. Now, if Linux is not the right tool for someone, then they should not use it nor waste time with it.


The API changed so Manufacturers didn't get it right. It doesn't change as nearly as often as the Linux API/ABI does. The only way to ensure compatibility is to give your code over and that isn't an option for a lot of companies ... thus you have the churn change situation.

I think it is f--king crazy that there are slightly different versions of the same components put together in different distros and people aren't surprised by it working.

I know that even changing how some of my JS is called in my larger JS apps can break everything and there is far less code than in distro.

But hey, I am a software engineer ... not a hacker, so what do I know.

Edited 2013-11-22 22:17 UTC

Reply Score: 2

RE[2]: Comment by MOS6510
by unclefester on Fri 22nd Nov 2013 02:56 UTC in reply to "RE: Comment by MOS6510"
unclefester Member since:
2007-01-13

Still does if you are heavy into multimedia, 3D and mobile computing.

My main laptop uses Windows 7 and I was a Linux Journal subscriber from 1995 until 2004.


My (Windows 7) laptop runs perfectly on Xubuntu.

Desktop Linux has improved a great deal since 2004

Reply Score: 4

RE[3]: Comment by MOS6510
by moondevil on Fri 22nd Nov 2013 05:55 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Comment by MOS6510"
moondevil Member since:
2005-07-08

Desktop Linux has improved a great deal since 2004


Tell that to my wireless card and DPMS driver.

Reply Score: 3

RE[4]: Comment by MOS6510
by r_a_trip on Fri 22nd Nov 2013 08:11 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: Comment by MOS6510"
r_a_trip Member since:
2005-07-06

Buy the wrong hardware and you'll experience grief with Linux.

Do some research on which hardware to buy and Linux is smooth sailing.

Reply Score: 5

RE[5]: Comment by MOS6510
by moondevil on Fri 22nd Nov 2013 08:58 UTC in reply to "RE[4]: Comment by MOS6510"
moondevil Member since:
2005-07-08

Yes, I have been hearing that since 1994.

I have better things to do with my life as locating and recompiling working drivers that were removed from distributions for FOSS political reasons.

Reply Score: 2

RE[6]: Comment by MOS6510
by unclefester on Fri 22nd Nov 2013 09:25 UTC in reply to "RE[5]: Comment by MOS6510"
unclefester Member since:
2007-01-13

Yes, I have been hearing that since 1994.

I have better things to do with my life as locating and recompiling working drivers that were removed from distributions for FOSS political reasons.



I've been using Linux since 2000. I've yet to encounter any of these mysterious hardware problems that seem plague some people.

I bet your'e one of those people who still claims that you need to use a soldering iron to install a memory stick on a PC.

Reply Score: 3

RE[7]: Comment by MOS6510
by lucas_maximus on Fri 22nd Nov 2013 10:13 UTC in reply to "RE[6]: Comment by MOS6510"
lucas_maximus Member since:
2009-08-18

"WORKS FOR ME, YOU MUST BE STUPID!" attitude is pathetic.

The fact of the matter is that there has been things that plague desktop Linux and they persist because of this very attitude.

Pretending that issues don't exist because they don't occur for you is dishonest and selfish.

Edited 2013-11-22 10:18 UTC

Reply Score: 3

RE[7]: Comment by MOS6510
by moondevil on Fri 22nd Nov 2013 10:16 UTC in reply to "RE[6]: Comment by MOS6510"
moondevil Member since:
2005-07-08

I've been using Linux since 2000. I've yet to encounter any of these mysterious hardware problems that seem plague some people.


My example is quite easy to find.

Canonical developers replaced working Broadcom binary drivers from the LTS by FOSS drivers that were still immature and distributed them via Ubuntu update.

Many users were forced to live with unstable wireless drivers until they fixed everything a few months later.

For those with free time on their hands, there was the possibility to manually rollback the changes produced by the update.

Forum links can be provided on request.

I bet your'e one of those people who still claims that you need to use a soldering iron to install a memory stick on a PC.


And I bet you are one of those FOSS zealots.

Reply Score: 2

RE[7]: Comment by MOS6510
by mikeinohio on Fri 22nd Nov 2013 14:49 UTC in reply to "RE[6]: Comment by MOS6510"
mikeinohio Member since:
2010-02-21

People who complain about hardware problems in Linux are usually comparing apples to oranges.

If you buy a pre-built Windows computer: all the hardware is going to work fine with the operating system. Likewise, if you were to buy a pre-built Linux computer from someplace like System76: you can be sure that the hardware will work just fine too.

The problem is when somebody takes a computer built for Windows and tries to install Linux on it. There may be some hardware you just can not get drivers for. The same problem happens when people try to switch versions of Windows on a machine and is probably worse. For example: If a person tries to upgrade a machine that came with Windows XP to Windows 7, it is likely that they are going to end up with some orphaned hardware.

Reply Score: 1

RE[6]: Comment by MOS6510
by Drumhellar on Fri 22nd Nov 2013 19:00 UTC in reply to "RE[5]: Comment by MOS6510"
Drumhellar Member since:
2005-07-12

Buy Intel hardware for wireless.
Problem solved. You no longer have to do research.

Though, I'm sure you'll find some other straw man to pick a fight with.

Reply Score: 2

RE[3]: Comment by MOS6510
by gass on Fri 22nd Nov 2013 10:26 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Comment by MOS6510"
gass Member since:
2006-11-29

i can added that my windows 7 and windowsXP runs very well on the linux laptop (thanks to virtualbox ;) )

The linux desktop has indeed evolved ... but still too many edges to cut. Mainly on having stable and integrated environments. Not some kind of a different OS every 6 months.
And only now we are reaching the non-technical OS, where you want to have the X application installed and you don't know how to do it, even though linux has the *store feature for ages (dpkg/ap-get?)

Reply Score: 2

RE[2]: Comment by MOS6510
by abraxas on Fri 22nd Nov 2013 18:48 UTC in reply to "RE: Comment by MOS6510"
abraxas Member since:
2005-07-07

"Linux sucked for some time.


Still does if you are heavy into multimedia, 3D and mobile computing.

That is why I keep it for server side development and my little netbook.

My main laptop uses Windows 7 and I was a Linux Journal subscriber from 1995 until 2004.
"


I have to ask..in what respect does it suck for multimedia, 3D, and mobile? Those aspects of Linux are all fine for me but maybe you have different requirements. Those all did suck very much for a long time but they are quite good now...at least in my opinion.

Reply Score: 3

RE[2]: Comment by MOS6510
by ricegf on Fri 22nd Nov 2013 22:22 UTC in reply to "RE: Comment by MOS6510"
ricegf Member since:
2007-04-25

"Linux sucked for some time.


Still does if you are heavy into multimedia, 3D and mobile computing.
"

I dunno, my Nexus 4 Linux phone is rock solid thus far. Seems to be doing pretty good in the commercial mobile market, too - 81% last quarter, at least as reported by IDC.

Maybe you're using the wrong Linux distro?

Reply Score: 1

RE[3]: Comment by MOS6510
by moondevil on Sat 23rd Nov 2013 06:42 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Comment by MOS6510"
moondevil Member since:
2005-07-08

Well, should I start using Android for my laptop?!!

Because except for Linux, which is a kernel. With changes not part of the mainline, the userland is 100% Java.

Which handset manufacturer should I ask for the drivers?

How well does Android work with mouse and keyboard?

Reply Score: 2

RE[4]: Comment by MOS6510
by ricegf on Sat 23rd Nov 2013 13:06 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: Comment by MOS6510"
ricegf Member since:
2007-04-25

OK, so you meant for a laptop - the majority of "mobile" is actually touch devices, so yours is the minority case.

What I would recommend for you is the Dell "Sputnik 3" laptop with Ubuntu pre-installed or, if you want a different distro for some reason, check a pre-install from Zareason (they have a wide variety).

Generally, regardless of OS, people unwilling to deal with finding drivers should always buy pre-installs. This is as true for Windows as for Linux, of course - I've done more installs of both than most, and while Linux is typically easier, some effort is ALWAYS required!

Reply Score: 1

RE: Comment by MOS6510
by Fergy on Sat 23rd Nov 2013 17:10 UTC in reply to "Comment by MOS6510"
Fergy Member since:
2006-04-10

Most version 1 products sucked.

Apple TV for example, 2nd and 3rd generation are still updated, but the first not anymore since a long time. The first iPhone and iPad were either lacking features or got obsoleted much quicker than following generations.

First Android phone.

Linux sucked for some time.

I guess every version 1 (Windows, Linux, Android) sucked either from the start or when compared to 2nd and following generations (iPad, iPhone, Apple TV).

To be successful in this business you need a long breath (==money) and figure out the weaknesses in your product and fix them.

With Windows Microsoft took a very long time to get things right. Even though version 3 brought them success, it still sucked. Windows 3.11 and Windows 2000 were some bright spots I guess, but Windows 7 (or perhaps Vista + service packs) was the first Windows version that didn't suck. And then they released Windows 8!!!

I think you have blinders on. Did the first big mac suck?

Reply Score: 1

RE[2]: Comment by MOS6510
by MOS6510 on Sat 23rd Nov 2013 18:36 UTC in reply to "RE: Comment by MOS6510"
MOS6510 Member since:
2011-05-12

I'm not an expert on fast food.

Reply Score: 2

Have it (almost)
by Drunkula on Fri 22nd Nov 2013 15:23 UTC
Drunkula
Member since:
2009-09-03

I actually have an original box copy of Windows 1.03 at home. I also have a 5.25 drive sitting in the same closet. I wonder if I can get it running on a spare computer. Last time I tried to get it to run it seemed very tempermental and would crash frequently. Don't know if Windows or the version of DOS I was using was the culprit. Might have something to experiment this weekend if I get bored...

Reply Score: 3

RE: Have it (almost)
by Doc Pain on Sat 23rd Nov 2013 02:28 UTC in reply to "Have it (almost)"
Doc Pain Member since:
2006-10-08

I actually have an original box copy of Windows 1.03 at home.


Version 1.02 DT (german version) here, on 6 5.25" disks, still sealed. :-)

I also have a 5.25 drive sitting in the same closet. I wonder if I can get it running on a spare computer.


From my "museum experience" this shouldn't be a big problem. Make sure everything is clean (free of dust). Also make sure your mains voltage is stable.

This old technology seems to be much more reliable than our today's "modern" technology. I still have computer systems from the early 1980's here, with disks and printer, running a CP/M clone - fully functional. I tend to experience fewer reading troubles with those old diskettes and drives than with some new DVD equipment... just curious if it would be possible to use today's devices in 30 years... ;-)

Mandatory pointer to the GUI Gallery:

http://toastytech.com/guis/indexwindows.html

Reply Score: 3

RE[2]: Have it (almost)
by unclefester on Sat 23rd Nov 2013 10:35 UTC in reply to "RE: Have it (almost)"
unclefester Member since:
2007-01-13

This old technology seems to be much more reliable than our today's "modern" technology. I still have computer systems from the early 1980's here, with disks and printer, running a CP/M clone - fully functional. I tend to experience fewer reading troubles with those old diskettes and drives than with some new DVD equipment... just curious if it would be possible to use today's devices in 30 years... ;-)



Thirty years ago hardware was vastly more expensive than modern hardware. People expected that very expensive hardware to last a long time so it had to be made well. Now a DVD burners costs <$20 so people have developed much lower expectations regarding quality. eg My laptop can't handle CDs or DVDs with very minor scratches and is often reluctant to eject discs.

Reply Score: 4