Linked by Thom Holwerda on Wed 11th Dec 2013 11:32 UTC
Microsoft

Ina Fried has just confirmed the Nokia Android phone - and even argues that Microsoft might go ahead with actually releasing it.

According to a Nokia source, the software has a look more similar to Windows Phone than to the "squircle" icons used on the Asha. Normandy would also serve as a way to deliver Microsoft services such as Bing and Skype.

That is seen by some at Microsoft as a more palatable alternative than seeing more of those first-time smartphone buyers sign up not just for Android but also for Google's array of services.

Makes sense. It does raise another question, though: wouldn't this be yet another operating system Microsoft would need to develop and support?

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That depends
by andrewclunn on Wed 11th Dec 2013 11:54 UTC
andrewclunn
Member since:
2012-11-05

I mean if it already has an array of Android apps available then, no real development needed. Also Microsoft could develop for any applications for Android for this platform simultaneously.

Reply Score: 3

Nokia Source
by Jbso on Wed 11th Dec 2013 13:28 UTC
Jbso
Member since:
2013-01-05

The source for the article is someone at Nokia who thinks Microsoft might release it. Sounds like wishful thinking to me, from someone who doesn't want their pet project killed. It would be crazy for Microsoft to buy Nokia so they could sell Android phones without even getting the Nokia brand.

Reply Score: 3

Mistake
by CapEnt on Wed 11th Dec 2013 13:29 UTC
CapEnt
Member since:
2005-12-18

If MS does this, IMHO, they will be doing a huge mistake. Not only this will deal a huge blow in the morale of their own internal Windows Phone development team (do not underestimate the disaster that this is on a company that depends on the creativity of their engineering team to survive), but will have implications outside the smartphone market for MS.

Think about it, MS tried his best to convince developers to spend a effort on WP and Metro, and if this phone is released, it would mean that all this effort was wasted. This will piss off the entire developer community that really took seriously Window Phone.

Worse, this will kill the entire MS convergence strategy. It will be the official dead of Metro UI, Win RT and Surface, since no developer will take these seriously anymore.

Reply Score: 6

RE: Mistake
by PhilB on Wed 11th Dec 2013 13:50 UTC in reply to "Mistake"
PhilB Member since:
2007-02-09

Don't worry, nobody has ever taken Microsoft seriously.

Reply Score: 3

RE[2]: Mistake
by moondevil on Wed 11th Dec 2013 14:24 UTC in reply to "RE: Mistake"
moondevil Member since:
2005-07-08

You surely don't work in the enterprise.

Reply Score: 4

RE[3]: Mistake
by JAlexoid on Wed 11th Dec 2013 14:52 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Mistake"
JAlexoid Member since:
2009-05-19

WP7 or WP8 are most definitely not taken seriously in the enterprise.

Reply Score: 7

RE[4]: Mistake
by BallmerKnowsBest on Wed 11th Dec 2013 20:46 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: Mistake"
BallmerKnowsBest Member since:
2008-06-02

Don't worry, nobody has ever taken Microsoft seriously.
"You surely don't work in the enterprise.
[q]WP7 or WP8 are most definitely not taken seriously in the enterprise.

"
[/q]

Derp, yeah, because it's not as if Microsoft has any other products for enterprise customers...

Reply Score: 2

RE[5]: Mistake
by JAlexoid on Thu 12th Dec 2013 10:42 UTC in reply to "RE[4]: Mistake"
JAlexoid Member since:
2009-05-19

And that changes WP's position... how exactly!?!?!

Reply Score: 3

RE[6]: Mistake
by BallmerKnowsBest on Fri 13th Dec 2013 18:26 UTC in reply to "RE[5]: Mistake"
BallmerKnowsBest Member since:
2008-06-02

And that changes WP's position... how exactly!?!?!


LOL WUT? You're challenging the relevance of my post - after you brought up WP as a complete non-sequitur in a thread that was about a completely separate topic? Does the phrase "Pot > Kettle > Black" mean anything to you?

You might want to try taking your own advice, and perhaps explaining how, exactly, WP's position has any relevance to whether or not Microsoft is taken seriously in enterprise customers (ya know, the actual topic of this thread)?

Waiting....

Reply Score: 3

RE[7]: Mistake
by JAlexoid on Mon 16th Dec 2013 17:43 UTC in reply to "RE[6]: Mistake"
JAlexoid Member since:
2009-05-19

"And that changes WP's position... how exactly!?!?!


LOL WUT? You're challenging the relevance of my post - after you brought up WP as a complete non-sequitur in a thread that was about a completely separate topic? Does the phrase "Pot > Kettle > Black" mean anything to you?

You might want to try taking your own advice, and perhaps explaining how, exactly, WP's position has any relevance to whether or not Microsoft is taken seriously in enterprise customers (ya know, the actual topic of this thread)?

Waiting....
"
Does the phrase "Pot > Kettle > Black" mean anything to you?

Yep, reminds me of you.

You might want to try taking your own advice, and perhaps explaining how, exactly, WP's position has any relevance to whether or not Microsoft is taken seriously in enterprise customers (ya know, the actual topic of this thread)?

Let's try a bit of reading exercise...

1) "Not only this will deal a huge blow in the morale of their own internal Windows Phone development team, but will have implications outside the smartphone market for MS. ... This will piss off the entire developer community that really took seriously Window Phone. ... " (CapEnt)
2) "nobody has ever taken Microsoft seriously" (PhilB)
3) "enterprise" (moondevil)
4) "WP7 or WP8 are most definitely not taken seriously in the enterprise." (Me)

So now tell me what is "ya know, the actual topic of this thread"? Or is moondevil the person setting the topics of threads over here?!?!?

Edited 2013-12-16 17:44 UTC

Reply Score: 2

RE[4]: Mistake
by Nelson on Wed 11th Dec 2013 23:26 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: Mistake"
Nelson Member since:
2005-11-29

http://bgr.com/2013/12/11/microsoft-tablet-sales-2014/

"81% of CIOs issue/plan to issue Windows tablets,
up dramatically from 56% six months ago, and nearly in line with iPads.” This is particularly important for Microsoft because the rise in corporate interest for Windows tablets has coincided with a collapse in corporate interest for Android tablets: According to Bernstein, only 15% of CIOs surveyed said that they’ve issued or plan to issue Android tablets. An upswing in demand in Windows tablets would dovetail nicely with the growth Microsoft has seen in Windows Phone sales this year, which has helped the company firmly establish Windows Phone as the world’s No. 3 mobile platform provider.


And FWIW, Microsoft owns the entire stack so non Windows Phones in the enterprise likely are still using Exchange and are still managed using Microsoft MDM solutions.

http://www.pcmag.com/article2/0,2817,2423899,00.asp

The tools that allow Microsoft to provide a comprehensive mobile-optimized IT ecosystem include Windows Server 2012 R2, System Center 2012 Configuration Manager, Windows Intune and Azure. With them, IT can centrally manage Windows phones and tablets as well as devices running Apple's iOS and Google's Android. I think it's safe to assume Windows mobile devices will be the optimal devices to work within a Windows ecosystem.

With Windows 8 mobile devices and PCs given the ability to join a Windows domain, IT can take advantage of features such Dynamic Access Control, Virtual Desktop Infrastructure, and multi-factor authentication to deliver a full corporate experience to a user's tablet or laptop. Redmond is also pushing those capabilities out to its phones. Recently, Tony Mestres, vice president of Windows Phone partner and channel marketing, announced an expansion of Windows Phone enterprise capabilities which includes access to corporate resources behind the firewall with app-aware, auto-triggered VPN.



....or maybe they'll use Chromebooks and Google Docs lol

Edited 2013-12-11 23:33 UTC

Reply Score: 3

RE[5]: Mistake
by galvanash on Thu 12th Dec 2013 09:54 UTC in reply to "RE[4]: Mistake"
galvanash Member since:
2006-01-25

""81% of CIOs issue/plan to issue Windows tablets,
up dramatically from 56% six months ago, and nearly in line with iPads.”


...snip

And FWIW, Microsoft owns the entire stack so non Windows Phones in the enterprise likely are still using Exchange and are still managed using Microsoft MDM solutions.
"

That's nice, but what does it have to do with WP7 and WP8?

Besides, I don't think a survey with a total sample size of 105 CIOs it is representative of any meaningful trend...

I have seen other surveys:

http://www.v3.co.uk/v3-uk/news/2265311/byod-to-be-widespread-in-bus...

...saying BYOD will hit nearly 50% of all businesses in the next two years. CIOs don't get much say about all of those purchases, will they?

And that survey involved 2000 CIOs...

Anyway, I work at a company that considers itself a "Microsoft Shop". We use most of their infrastructure management tools, almost all of our desktops are Windows 7/8, we use Exchange for Email, SQL for our databases, Office for our productivity tools, etc. etc.

We used to issue BBs for phones. Switched to BYOD about 2 years ago, and we let users pick from iOS, Android, or WP.

You could fit every Windows Phone in our organization in your front pocket...

So yeah, Tablets? Maybe... I could see that happening - Surface has some compelling use cases. Phones? Not a chance in hell - Windows Phone may creep up to 5%-10% marketshare for a while, but I see no reason to believe it will ever get anywhere north of that - especially when you factor in that the nearly half of all business phones will be bought through consumer channels in the coming years...

Reply Score: 3

RE[6]: Mistake
by Nelson on Thu 12th Dec 2013 11:06 UTC in reply to "RE[5]: Mistake"
Nelson Member since:
2005-11-29



That's nice, but what does it have to do with WP7 and WP8?

Besides, I don't think a survey with a total sample size of 105 CIOs it is representative of any meaningful trend...


This has always been about Microsoft allegedly not being relevant in enterprise, something patently false. That's despite JAlexoid and your attempt to reframe the argument.


I have seen other surveys:

http://www.v3.co.uk/v3-uk/news/2265311/byod-to-be-widespread-in-bus...

...saying BYOD will hit nearly 50% of all businesses in the next two years. CIOs don't get much say about all of those purchases, will they?

And that survey involved 2000 CIOs...


That's the advantage of Microsoft being a vendor of management tools, the email infrastructure, Office, Windows, Sharepoint, etc.

Microsoft is highly, highly entrenched in the enterprise. They're being paid one way or another.


Anyway, I work at a company that considers itself a "Microsoft Shop". We use most of their infrastructure management tools, almost all of our desktops are Windows 7/8, we use Exchange for Email, SQL for our databases, Office for our productivity tools, etc. etc.

We used to issue BBs for phones. Switched to BYOD about 2 years ago, and we let users pick from iOS, Android, or WP.


Illustrates the point I just made. WP for now having low enterprise penetration is completely aside from Microsoft dominating the enterprise.


Phone may creep up to 5%-10% marketshare for a while, but I see no reason to believe it will ever get anywhere north of that - especially when you factor in that the nearly half of all business phones will be bought through consumer channels in the coming years...


That nay or may not be the case, but fortunes change and tables turn. Microsoft's enterprise position gives it an opportunity to have a conversation about a completely vertical solution where they have a compelling story. What happens down the road, does the consumeration of IT fizzle out, is it a given that BYOD is here to stay? We'll see.

Edited 2013-12-12 11:12 UTC

Reply Score: 3

RE[7]: Mistake
by galvanash on Thu 12th Dec 2013 11:17 UTC in reply to "RE[6]: Mistake"
galvanash Member since:
2006-01-25

This has always been about Mucrosoft allegedly not being relevant in enterprise, something patently false. That's despite JAlexoid and your attempt to reframe the argument.


I don't know what "this" you are talking about... The post you replied to was about Windows Phone not being relevant - and your comment offered nothing to contradict that argument.

I certainly think Microsoft is extremely relevant in the enterprise market. But Windows Phone?

Uh, no.

Edited 2013-12-12 11:18 UTC

Reply Score: 3

RE[7]: Mistake
by JAlexoid on Fri 13th Dec 2013 17:16 UTC in reply to "RE[6]: Mistake"
JAlexoid Member since:
2009-05-19

This has always been about Microsoft allegedly not being relevant in enterprise, something patently false. That's despite JAlexoid and your attempt to reframe the argument.


Really? Always?
Because the context of this comment thread are mobile phones, steering the conversation back into the area of the topic is somehow reframing the argument!?!?!

There is no argument that Microsoft is relevant in the enterprise, yet WP is not. And no matter how much you wish to wave your hands, neither is WinRT or full blown Windows tablets at the moment.
BYOD is all the rage, not Windows.

Reply Score: 3

RE[5]: Mistake
by JAlexoid on Thu 12th Dec 2013 10:40 UTC in reply to "RE[4]: Mistake"
JAlexoid Member since:
2009-05-19

Again!?!?! Seriously... you are now a branded diehard Microsoft fanboy.
Ignoring totally that Windows Tablets are not Windows Phones and ranting on.

Fact of the matter is that Microsoft does not offer an accelerated VPN... And guess what? WP still cannot play nice with corporate VPNs. And enterprises with their own Exchange servers don't tend to give direct access to Exchange without a protected network connection setup.

That is why Good for Enterprise and BB are widely used. But hey... don't let Microsoft's sad state of affairs in the enterprise mobile market detract you from replying with irrelevant rants.

Reply Score: 3

RE[6]: Mistake
by Nelson on Thu 12th Dec 2013 12:25 UTC in reply to "RE[5]: Mistake"
Nelson Member since:
2005-11-29

VPN for Exchange is pretty much a cherry picked corner case, its not something that's fundamentally required.

Reply Score: 3

RE[7]: Mistake
by JAlexoid on Fri 13th Dec 2013 17:06 UTC in reply to "RE[6]: Mistake"
JAlexoid Member since:
2009-05-19

Access to corporate resources over a secure connection is far from a corner case. Exchange is just one example, that happens to be most widely used.
It is also far from cherry picked - it's plain the most visible element when it comes to use of a mobile device in the enterprise.

Reply Score: 2

RE: Mistake
by glarepate on Wed 11th Dec 2013 20:28 UTC in reply to "Mistake"
glarepate Member since:
2006-01-04

Nokia and MSFT are about the only two companies selling WP and RT and MSFT had to buy the Devices and Services Division from Nokia to keep it from tanking the company which would have killed virtually their whole phone/OS market.

This leaves a tiny percentage (and a tiny number too!) of devices from other manufacturers using those OSes as the only ones paying for licenses. It may cost them more to collect the fees than they make on them.

Pretending they are offering products that either manufacturers or consumers are willing to pay for is simply delusional. Better they admit it and [try to] move on.

Reply Score: 2

Nokia
by henderson101 on Thu 12th Dec 2013 13:56 UTC
henderson101
Member since:
2006-05-30

When we are talking about "Nokia" here, what do we actually mean? The division that Microsoft are buying, or the company left over after Microsoft buy the phone business? It sprung in to my head that is could be the latter...

Reply Score: 4