Linked by Thom Holwerda on Thu 27th Feb 2014 23:21 UTC
Ubuntu, Kubuntu, Xubuntu

The Ubuntu Touch smartphone OS has come a long way, but it still has further to plod before it's ready for market - all Canonical will tell us that it hopes to see an Ubuntu phone before the end of this year. Nevertheless, now that some phone manufacturers are on board with the project, we've been able to play with a couple of prototypes: One was just a non-functioning handset from a Spanish company called BQ, showing off plain but solid build quality reflective of a mid-tier device. The other was more interesting - a re-purposed Android handset from a second Ubuntu partner, Meizu, which makes light work of the operating system and interface.

It looks a bit choppy to me, but alas, it's a development build.

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Oh well...
by vtpoet on Fri 28th Feb 2014 00:27 UTC
vtpoet
Member since:
2013-12-31

It's really too bad Canonical didn't raise enough cash during its crowd-funding campaign. The hardware looked much more of-a-piece -- much more part of an overall vision. (Jobs' obsession with hardware, I think, helped sell Apple products.) If someone (not an Ubuntu user) can buy the same second-rate phone with Android, why buy Ubuntu? Would they even know what Ubuntu was? Who cares if the OS runs across different hardware? Big deal. Only a very few I suspect.

On the other hand, ChromeOS runs on 3rd rate hardware and is selling fairly well, but Google went after a niche that hadn't yet been filled. Ubuntu? They're trying to squeeze into a settled market. An OS that extends across devices is technically cool but, in the harsh practicalities of the market, is probably going to be utterly irrelevant -- and that seems to be their only real selling point. Hardware? No. Just run-of-the-mill. Price point? No. Ease if use? No. What advantage does Ubuntu bring to the table? Can't think of any that will matter to the market. They're a day late and a dollar short.

I hope I'm wrong. I hope Canonical succeeds, but if I had to put money on the table, I would bet against them. Shuttleworth seems like he was in the right place at the right time just once in his career (made his millions) but hasn't done much since (nothing more than anyone could have done with the same millions). I don't have much faith in his leadership.

Reply Score: 3

RE: Oh well...
by Nelson on Fri 28th Feb 2014 01:14 UTC in reply to "Oh well..."
Nelson Member since:
2005-11-29

ChromeOS was outsold by Windows RT in 2013. It is not selling well. According to IDC, it moved 2.5M units into the channel in 2013.

Reply Score: 3

RE[2]: Oh well...
by MOS6510 on Fri 28th Feb 2014 13:24 UTC in reply to "RE: Oh well..."
MOS6510 Member since:
2011-05-12

And I wonder how many of those 2.5 M units have users that try to turn them in to real laptops?

Personally I think the whole Chromebook idea is silly. You take a real computer, make a webbrowser the OS and then try to make it run webapps to move back to true laptop functionality.

Reply Score: 5

RE[2]: Oh well...
by ralph on Fri 28th Feb 2014 19:45 UTC in reply to "RE: Oh well..."
ralph Member since:
2005-07-10

Chromebooks accounted for 21 percent of all notebook* sales, up from negligible share in the prior year, and 8 percent of all computer and tablet sales through November, up from one tenth of a percent in 2012 – the largest share increase across the various product segments.
Figures for the US by NPD.

Reply Score: 3

RE[3]: Oh well...
by Nelson on Fri 28th Feb 2014 20:05 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Oh well..."
Nelson Member since:
2005-11-29

NPD claimed they were for commercial channels. The total size of that segment of the market is 14.4M

Doing some math it works out to ~3M. Not too far from the IDCs numbers.

To suggest that Chromebooks are 21% of the entire notebook market is hilariously off base.

Chromebooks have been an abject failure in anything except the Education sector where limited budgets make cost a deciding factor, and its nothing that Microsoft can't (and in fact currently is) beat back with licensing price cuts.

When your only differentiator is price, you will always lose to the established player if they're willing to dance with you at that price point.

Edited 2014-02-28 20:08 UTC

Reply Score: 1

RE[4]: Oh well...
by ralph on Fri 28th Feb 2014 23:12 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: Oh well..."
ralph Member since:
2005-07-10

NPD claimed they were for commercial channels. The total size of that segment of the market is 14.4M

Doing some math it works out to ~3M. Not too far from the IDCs numbers.


So the market share is too high, as it is only for a small segment of the market, commercial channels in the US.

Yet on the other hand the 3M is not too far from the IDC number, though IDC's number is worldwide and the 3M is for a segment of the US market.

I really have a hard time following your logic here.

Reply Score: 1

RE[5]: Oh well...
by Nelson on Sat 1st Mar 2014 02:10 UTC in reply to "RE[4]: Oh well..."
Nelson Member since:
2005-11-29

A great majority of Chromebooks are sold in the US, particularly the education sector.

Then there are the methodology differences between NPD and IDC.

Lastly, the 14.4M figure is a ceiling, there may be various exclusions, it may count things that aren't considered traditional sales by the IDC. I presented it for simplicity's sake.

I think at the very least, your original post lacked an amazing amount of context and implied 21% of the entire netbook market. That's ludicrous and wishful thinking.

Reply Score: 3

RE[3]: Oh well...
by Nelson on Fri 28th Feb 2014 20:24 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Oh well..."
Nelson Member since:
2005-11-29

Here's the source:
https://www.npd.com/wps/portal/npd/us/news/press-releases/u-s-commer...

Its in the first sentence. Lets put this fairytale that ChromeOS is selling well to rest.

Reply Score: 2

RE: Oh well...
by Fergy on Fri 28th Feb 2014 08:22 UTC in reply to "Oh well..."
Fergy Member since:
2006-04-10

It's really too bad Canonical didn't raise enough cash during its crowd-funding campaign. The hardware looked much more of-a-piece -- much more part of an overall vision. (Jobs' obsession with hardware, I think, helped sell Apple products.)

Nobody has ever seen the 'hardware' because it was a render of the device. It also 'used' new materials that no company has ever used. There was no prototype.

It shows how stupid people can be with their money that Canonical even got half way to their ridiculous millions. How could you do that based on an idea when Canonical has never succeeded? The only thing Canonical did successfully is become the number 1 distro for a few years.

I had high hopes for Canonical but the last few years showed me nothing I could believe in.

Reply Score: 2

RE[2]: Oh well...
by vtpoet on Fri 28th Feb 2014 13:13 UTC in reply to "RE: Oh well..."
vtpoet Member since:
2013-12-31

"Nobody has ever seen the 'hardware' because it was a render of the device."

You're right. I was really referring to the "proposed" hardware. Looked much better than what they've currently got.

The fact that there are only 5 comments, not including this one Thom, says everything that needs be said... sadly. There are already 30 comments on Samsung's Tizen OS -- for whatever reason.

Canonical may limp along, or not.

Reply Score: 1

RE[3]: Oh well...
by Sodki on Fri 28th Feb 2014 22:06 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Oh well..."
Sodki Member since:
2005-11-10

The fact that there are only 5 comments, not including this one Thom, says everything that needs be said... sadly.


My personal opinion is that lately, unlike in the beginning, Canonical's attitude of fighting everyone and fighting alone has alienated many of its supporters, myself included.

Reply Score: 3

RE[4]: Oh well...
by Gone fishing on Sat 1st Mar 2014 00:55 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: Oh well..."
Gone fishing Member since:
2006-02-22

My personal opinion is that lately, unlike in the beginning, Canonical's attitude of fighting everyone and fighting alone has alienated many of its supporters, myself included.


I largely agree, however, if I can get an Ubuntu phone that's relatively inexpensive I will. I want one, a Linux phone that updates, I control and use as a computer appeals to me. Canonical's strategy looks high risk and probably a mistake, but that wouldn't stop me from getting their phone and just maybe they know what they are doing

Reply Score: 3

RE[5]: Oh well...
by Sodki on Mon 3rd Mar 2014 00:52 UTC in reply to "RE[4]: Oh well..."
Sodki Member since:
2005-11-10

I largely agree, however, if I can get an Ubuntu phone that's relatively inexpensive I will. I want one, a Linux phone that updates, I control and use as a computer appeals to me.


That's the thing, I'm not sure you will be in full control of the phone. You're describing (in a way) my N900, but it's getting very old now and unfortunately it seems to be the only one of its kind.

Reply Score: 2

RE: Oh well...
by moondevil on Fri 28th Feb 2014 12:41 UTC in reply to "Oh well..."
moondevil Member since:
2005-07-08

On the other hand, ChromeOS runs on 3rd rate hardware and is selling fairly well


Where?!? I am yet to see anyone using one on my travels across Europe, or on sale for that matter.

Reply Score: 2

RE[2]: Oh well...
by drcouzelis on Fri 28th Feb 2014 14:11 UTC in reply to "RE: Oh well..."
drcouzelis Member since:
2010-01-11

Where?!? I am yet to see anyone using one on my travels across Europe, or on sale for that matter.

I recently had some free time in Connecticut (US) so I browsed my local Staples store. I was surprised to see more than one Chromebook (I think there were three different models) on display and for sale. I tried one out. I was surprised because I had forgotten that Google added "windowing" support, and that it's no longer just a single fullscreen web browser window. ;)

I had some fun listening to a sales clerk explain Chromebooks to another customer. As a computer nerd myself, the clerk's description sounded a little silly.

Anyway, I have absolutely no idea if Chromebooks are selling well or are popular or are useful or are able to make me pancakes. I just wanted to share that story. ;)

Reply Score: 2

RE[3]: Oh well...
by leos on Sat 1st Mar 2014 06:36 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Oh well..."
leos Member since:
2005-09-21

I picked one up this summer, the Samsung arm version.
The guy at Futureshop asked me if I knew what it was, since most people buy it and then return it when they realize it isn't a normal laptop.
It's ok, but overall I regret buying it. The only use it has is for watching Netflix. My iPhone is a better web browser, and it's useless for doing work on. So it mostly collects dust. Dirt cheap and about as appealing.

Reply Score: 3

RE[4]: Oh well...
by Lennie on Sat 1st Mar 2014 17:12 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: Oh well..."
Lennie Member since:
2007-09-22

Mine is a dual boot with normal desktop Linux.

Reply Score: 3

RE[2]: Oh well...
by vtpoet on Tue 4th Mar 2014 13:40 UTC in reply to "RE: Oh well..."
vtpoet Member since:
2013-12-31

Don't really have a dog in the ChromeOS hunt, but just noticed this article:

http://www.linux.com/news/embedded-mobile/mobile-linux/764754-how-w...

For what it's worth.

Reply Score: 1

Re:
by kurkosdr on Fri 28th Feb 2014 10:17 UTC
kurkosdr
Member since:
2011-04-11

The ability to dock a smartphone and have a full desktop. That's all I care about when it comes to Ubuntu smartphones.

Did they revealed when it 'll be available and what are the hardware requirements for it?

Edited 2014-02-28 10:18 UTC

Reply Score: 3

Ubuntu is about convergence
by pica on Fri 28th Feb 2014 19:46 UTC
pica
Member since:
2005-07-10

my main interest in Ubuntu Phone is its vision to provide a smartphone that is able to replace an low end laptop or desktop. The vision to have a smartphone I simply put into a docking station and use it as a desktop really fascinates me.

But looking at the specifications of the Meizu MX3, I do not think that dream comes true yet.

pica


PS About MX3 - I ride a Voitl MX3 (http://www.voitl-bikes.de/produkte_mx3.html) based bike for over 5 years now. That beast is a dream :-)

Reply Score: 1

Gadget Lovers Will Install, Not Buy
by andrewclunn on Mon 3rd Mar 2014 21:23 UTC
andrewclunn
Member since:
2012-11-05

You can bet I'm going to run this OS when it's release ready. You can also bet that I'm going to install it on an existing Android device to play with rather than purchase something new just for it. Such is the issue with selling open source software. You HAVE to sell me on the hardware, otherwise there's nothing to sell.

Reply Score: 2