Linked by Adam S on Thu 12th Jun 2014 23:36 UTC
Android

I am taking the plunge and moving from an iPhone to an Android device. I've been waiting a long time for Android to get to the point that it was fast and responsive enough, with a big enough application warehouse, wide enough support, and a smooth enough experience, to support me. Android is maturing with a consistent, system-wide look-and-feel, almost every major service now has an Android app as the counterpart to its iOS-first experience, and has a bright future with wearables, home automation, and more.

I certainly won't be the first person to change ecosystems entirely. Several have done it before, some looking for change or claim freedom, some aiming to save money, some because someone prompted them, some think they may be conforming by going with the ever-stylish Apple. I am doing it for this reason: for me, Android is now a better platform than iOS.

Order by: Score:
iOS vs Android
by Eugenia on Thu 12th Jun 2014 23:58 UTC
Eugenia
Member since:
2005-06-28

It depends what you want to do. I'm doing artworks these days, and an iPad is far superior in the types of apps I'm looking for to Android. Of course, I have to put up with all the disadvantages of iOS as you mentioned them, but if you're looking for a specific type of art apps, you can't go Android yet.

This is why I use an Android as my phone, and an iPad for my art stuff. Should Android get these types of apps in the future, I will buy an Android tablet too. To me, just like the Mac in the olden days, the artistic/creative apps are the last stronghold of iOS.

Regarding phone-chasing, try the new 5.5" LG G3, with the 4k display. I know you said you want a smaller sized display, but this phone has the smallest bezels ever so far, so it looks more like a 5" phone rather than 5.5". It's significantly smaller to the OnePlus 1, even if it has the same size display. Check the review here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d6605kiXmm8 at 1:25 minutes for a size comparison. Personally, as you know, I bought the OnePlus One (I will be writing a review for OSNews when it finally arrives).

Edited 2014-06-13 00:03 UTC

Reply Score: 3

RE: iOS vs Android
by Luminair on Fri 13th Jun 2014 03:40 UTC in reply to "iOS vs Android"
Luminair Member since:
2007-03-30

G2 was the best phone, and now G3 is the best phone. HTC one is nice too of course. If any of the best android phones were released by apple, the world would shake with delight.

Similarly, the new broadwell concept at computex is what the new apple products will look like. It didn't register with anyone yet though, because there was no apple sticker!

Reply Score: 1

RE: iOS vs Android
by CaptainN- on Fri 13th Jun 2014 06:33 UTC in reply to "iOS vs Android"
CaptainN- Member since:
2005-07-07

Thoughts on jailbreaking to get get around the disadvantages of iOS?

Aside from the "drug deal" feel of jailbreaking, I actually think it's a pretty interesting way to keep the less savvy users from installing god knows what on their devices, while posing only a mild challenge for those so motivated to run the jailbreak (and providing something of a test for the privilege, if only a small one).

Reply Score: 3

RE: iOS vs Android
by Lobotomik on Fri 13th Jun 2014 08:19 UTC in reply to "iOS vs Android"
Lobotomik Member since:
2006-01-03

Eugenia, you are sadly right. There are many more "creativity" apps for iOS than there are for Android, a few of which are very, very good.

Compared with iMovies, which is SO nice, the current video editor in Android Photos is a POS. It is cute and easy for a rapid Sunday-morning-with-the-dogs video with music, but it is VERY slow and VERY imprecise, and when the time comes to save, it is difficult to tell where the _F_ will it end up, whether it will remain editable, at what resolution will it be...

As for music, there is sadly nothing that can remotely compare to Garage Band on Android, not to talk about the cartload of sequencers, loopers and synthesizers you can find. As well as MIDI adapters, keyboards, recorders, the works.

As for still pictures, Android can import them directly from a camera, or from a card reader plugged into the USB port, only nobody knows, and adapter cables are not easy to find (though they cost like 3€). Android's offer for photo editing offer is better than that for music or video, and you can even get tablets and phones with pressure sensitive styli, which I guess should be far more precise than finger painting on an iPad.

Reply Score: 3

RE: iOS vs Android
by jgfenix on Sat 14th Jun 2014 00:17 UTC in reply to "iOS vs Android"
jgfenix Member since:
2006-05-25

What applications?
Isn't it better a Galaxy Note with a s-pen (Wacom digitizer)?

Reply Score: 3

RE: iOS vs Android
by hadji457 on Sat 14th Jun 2014 11:57 UTC in reply to "iOS vs Android"
hadji457 Member since:
2005-08-21

As a musician, iOS is the best choice. Since I have an iPad, my choice in a phone is kinda irrelevant now. I actually just use my phone as a phone. Might as well just use my old Moto Razr flip phone!

Reply Score: 2

RE: iOS vs Android
by roki56 on Tue 17th Jun 2014 21:55 UTC in reply to "iOS vs Android"
roki56 Member since:
2014-06-17

How to jailbrek your iPhone, iPad or iPod on easiest way? We want to help you avoid the limitation of IOS systems, therefore offer this tool to be able to jailbreak your Apple device. http://bypassicloudactivationlockios.blogspot.com/2014/05/jailbreak... ...

Reply Score: 1

Excellent choice!
by cmost on Fri 13th Jun 2014 00:07 UTC
cmost
Member since:
2006-07-16

I've been with Android since the very beginning and all of my phones have been Nexus devices running the purest form of Android. I will never use Apple products because I do not like Apple the company. Aside from the fact that one never really owns an Apple device (you merely use it in the manner Apple deems acceptable) their products are grossly overpriced for the specifications offered. In almost every way, Android phones and tablets are superior and offer many more options such as connectivity, expansion and performance. You've made an excellent choice, congratulations.

Reply Score: 5

RE: Excellent choice!
by henderson101 on Fri 13th Jun 2014 00:53 UTC in reply to "Excellent choice!"
henderson101 Member since:
2006-05-30

Aside from the fact that one never really owns an Apple device


Quite blatantly untrue. You own your apple device no less than any non Nexus device and in many ways, your is upgrade path is far richer with an Apple device. Only the Nexus makes this untrue for android, and even then you need to factor in the shortcomings of the Nexus devices.

In almost every way, Android phones and tablets are superior and offer many more options such as connectivity, expansion and performance.


Expansion/connectivity - not really. Stock android supports the same types of expansion as iOS. SD, USB etc, these are all hacks on stock android as much as they are on iOS. However, it's obvious you have a blinkered opinion. There are far more interesting devices that one may plug in to an iPhone than an android device (for example, there are some pretty amazing iOS add one for music production.)

Performance - swings and roundabouts, but I'd rather have a mobile device that performs well whilst having decent battery life due to sensible power management, rather that a powerful device that eats my battery in a couple of hours.

Reply Score: 1

RE[2]: Excellent choice!
by Drumhellar on Fri 13th Jun 2014 09:08 UTC in reply to "RE: Excellent choice!"
Drumhellar Member since:
2005-07-12

Aside from the fact that one never really owns an Apple device


Quite blatantly untrue. You own your apple device no less than any non Nexus device and in many ways, your is upgrade path is far richer with an Apple device.



I don't think he meant it literally, but rather that all the limitations Apple places all around makes it difficult (or impossible) to customize it in a lot of ways and make it truly fit your style the way you can with Android.

Hell, you can't even access data on a plugged in iPhone without Apple's iTunes being the gatekeeper.

Reply Score: 6

v RE[3]: Excellent choice!
by Tony Swash on Fri 13th Jun 2014 13:27 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Excellent choice!"
RE[4]: Excellent choice!
by JAlexoid on Fri 13th Jun 2014 15:28 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: Excellent choice!"
JAlexoid Member since:
2009-05-19

Did no one around here actually watch the recent Apple WWDC?

You guys are mostly talking about the past.

When the other shoe drops this fall (new hardware, new device categories and additional features in the OS that never made the cut for WWDC) the entire Apple ecosystem will be transformed.


They are talking about now, not autumn. You are talking about the future... (Last I checked, autumn 2014 is in the future)

Reply Score: 5

RE[3]: Excellent choice!
by ilovebeer on Fri 13th Jun 2014 15:48 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Excellent choice!"
ilovebeer Member since:
2011-08-08

Hell, you can't even access data on a plugged in iPhone without Apple's iTunes being the gatekeeper.

That's 100% false. There are several apps that can access practically anything in an iphone (or idevice for that matter). Just yesterday I used iFunBox to `sideload` an older version of the iHome Sleep app that's no longer available through the app store. I copied the app from someone elses phone who hadn't updated. The copy isn't locked to their device or contain any of their information (such as appleid). No trickery or jailbreak required.

Reply Score: 1

RE[4]: Excellent choice!
by Drumhellar on Fri 13th Jun 2014 23:55 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: Excellent choice!"
Drumhellar Member since:
2005-07-12

I've never had much success with my 2nd gen iPod Touch using third party software to access it - on Windows, Linux, or FreeBSD. Granted, I haven't tried recently, but I may give it a shot again.

But, still, those third-party apps aren't supported. iTunes is the only officially supported gatekeeper to your device.

Reply Score: 2

RE[5]: Excellent choice!
by ilovebeer on Sat 14th Jun 2014 02:37 UTC in reply to "RE[4]: Excellent choice!"
ilovebeer Member since:
2011-08-08

They're supported by the people (individuals and companies) who make them, and people get full blown access to their devices. As long as they have that, I doubt many people care if Apple officially supports them or not. I know I don't.

Reply Score: 2

poor choice
by henderson101 on Fri 13th Jun 2014 00:34 UTC
henderson101
Member since:
2006-05-30

Now seems just about the worst time to be jumping ship. I have a Nexus 4 as my main phone, but used iOS for about 5 years prior (iPhone 3G, 3GS, 4) and would probably go back to iOS with my next phone because even stock Android on a Nexus device is flakey. Only today, stock camera app crashed taking a picture and rebooted the OS, and this is running 4.4. I do like my nexus, but it's not the best phone I've owned by a long chalk. Most of the supposed freedom of android is pretty hollow if you are just trying to be an uber geek and run some whacky Unix process on your phone. If all you do ius read news, Facebook, email, SMS, and instagram - I wouldn't bother. Believe me, I've sat and developed apps on my phone in AIDE, and it was great, but average user, this is overkill.

Edit: Android autocorrect screwed up just as badly as you believe iOS does. Nothing is perfect. Sigh.

Edited 2014-06-13 00:37 UTC

Reply Score: 5

v RE: poor choice
by WorknMan on Fri 13th Jun 2014 01:37 UTC in reply to "poor choice"
RE[2]: poor choice
by Adam S on Fri 13th Jun 2014 01:47 UTC in reply to "RE: poor choice"
Adam S Member since:
2005-04-01

Well, great news for you, buddy. The HTC One is just a test device for work. I actually got a Moto X.

Although, my guess, based on your tone, is that any device would've gotten the same reaction from you. You don't seem judgmental at all.

--

1) The iPhone does support using the LED for notifications, check your accessibility settings.
2) What do you mean custom sounds for each app? My iPhone makes plenty of custom noises. Just in the last hour, AP News, Facebook Messenger, SMS, and GroupMe have all made different sounds to alert me.

Edited 2014-06-13 01:49 UTC

Reply Score: 5

RE[3]: poor choice
by Morgan on Fri 13th Jun 2014 02:08 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: poor choice"
Morgan Member since:
2005-06-29

1) The iPhone does support using the LED for notifications, check your accessibility settings.


I think he meant a front-facing LED, not the rear camera flash LED. But yeah, his tone was decidedly harsh and negative, to the point of being awkward.

Anyway, I'm curious what your opinion of Windows Phone is, compared to iOS or Android. I saw passing mention of a BB10 device in the household, and I'm wondering if you've ever used a WP device? If so, I'd love to read your opinion of it.

Reply Score: 2

RE[4]: poor choice
by Adam S on Fri 13th Jun 2014 02:12 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: poor choice"
Adam S Member since:
2005-04-01

I have used WP, but not for enough time or with enough access to give a real opinion of it. From what I've read, it's just now coming into its own, so it may be a more compelling option in the next 12-18 months. For now, I'd steer clear solely because of the lack of apps. I can replicate my entire iPhone homescreen on Android, but I cannot do it on WP... yet.

Reply Score: 2

RE[5]: poor choice
by Morgan on Fri 13th Jun 2014 03:42 UTC in reply to "RE[4]: poor choice"
Morgan Member since:
2005-06-29

I've never had an app-centric mindset, so I guess that's one reason WP appeals to me so much. For me it's all about the workflow, and for what I do with a phone, WP is about as intuitive and fluid as it can get. Android is a close second, but even on modern flagship phones it still feels just a little too unfinished for my taste. iOS is right out; it's great on the iPad, just as Android is great on a good tablet, but as a phone it's just too much like a Fisher Price toy for my taste.

There are some downsides to WP, as there are with any platform; it's not just a lack of apps but also a lack of polish on some of them. Even first tier apps like Facebook and Pandora are half-finished, slow, buggy nightmares on WP, in stark contrast to the OS itself. Pandora in particular is annoying, as my JVC car stereo supports Pandora's Accessory function over Bluetooth, but only in the iOS and Android versions of the app. On my HTC 8XT I have to switch the stereo to standard Bluetooth Audio mode, and I lose the custom Pandora controls (thumbs up/down, skip track, change station).

Speaking of that car stereo, it also brings out some of the highlights and pleasures of using a WP device. The voice control on this phone is nearly flawless; it will read the text of SMS messages and allow me to dictate a response, all without touching a thing or taking my eyes off the road, and its voice recognition rivals Google Now. Turn-by-turn navigation is likewise nearly flawless in execution. For some reason I never could get Android to do voice control and recognition correctly, even on a Nexus device.

I guess since I'm not all about the hundreds of thousands of useless apps -- and believe me, there are tons of those in the WP Store as well -- I can find solace in a phone OS that doesn't feel rough around the edges (Android) or too controlling and childish (iOS).

Reply Score: 3

RE[6]: poor choice
by dukes on Fri 13th Jun 2014 14:45 UTC in reply to "RE[5]: poor choice"
dukes Member since:
2005-07-06

Morgan,

It's quite interesting reading your comments about iOS/Android/WP. It's exactly the thinking I took which landed me onto WP (ultimately).

iOS user since 07. But today I enjoy Android on my Nexus tablet, WP on my phone, and iOS almost nowhere. It all just kinda happened since I tend to concentrate on how I get things done rather than what app is missing.

Reply Score: 4

RE[7]: poor choice
by brichpmr on Sun 15th Jun 2014 10:19 UTC in reply to "RE[6]: poor choice"
brichpmr Member since:
2006-04-22

Morgan,

It's quite interesting reading your comments about iOS/Android/WP. It's exactly the thinking I took which landed me onto WP (ultimately).

iOS user since 07. But today I enjoy Android on my Nexus tablet, WP on my phone, and iOS almost nowhere. It all just kinda happened since I tend to concentrate on how I get things done rather than what app is missing.


And, as a counterpoint, I enjoy the iOS/OSX ecosystem everywhere between multiple devices and computers....syncs easily, is smooth and reliable.....ymmv.

Reply Score: 1

RE[3]: poor choice
by WorknMan on Fri 13th Jun 2014 02:09 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: poor choice"
WorknMan Member since:
2005-11-13

Although, my guess, based on your tone, is that any device would've gotten the same reaction from you.


No, just the HTC One. The Moto X itself isn't really that great, but at least people don't buy it for no other reason than it is shiny. And because I know you're going to ask:

http://www.theverge.com/2014/5/30/5764836/motorola-shutting-down-us...

1) The iPhone does support using the LED for notifications, check your accessibility settings.


Yeah, a notification LED on the back... that's handy ;) And a battery drain as well.

2) What do you mean custom sounds for each app? My iPhone makes plenty of custom noises. Just in the last hour, AP News, Facebook Messenger, SMS, and GroupMe have all made different sounds to alert me.


According to one iOS dev I asked, 3rd party apps are not allowed to access the built-in iOS notification tones in their apps, so they have to incorporate their own. The end result of this is that a lot of 3rd party apps (including Google Plus and Google Voice) end up using the default iOS Tri Tone, with no option to change, which is goddamn annoying. Plus, there's no multi-color LED or anything to distinguish between which app(s) you have notifications for.

Edited 2014-06-13 02:15 UTC

Reply Score: 1

RE[4]: poor choice
by henderson101 on Fri 13th Jun 2014 11:50 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: poor choice"
henderson101 Member since:
2006-05-30

I'm going to be honest - the LED is okay, and minorly useful, but I wouldn't base my entire phone buying around that feature. Plus - honestly, I don't even know which apps make what colour.. I know blue is the regular, and something like Facebook uses green, but most just use the stock.

Reply Score: 2

RE[4]: poor choice
by darknexus on Sat 14th Jun 2014 05:01 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: poor choice"
darknexus Member since:
2008-07-15

According to one iOS dev I asked, 3rd party apps are not allowed to access the built-in iOS notification tones in their apps, so they have to incorporate their own.

Ask a few more devs, because that one is an idiot. I've got plenty of gripes with Apple and iOS, but that sure isn't one of them. If an app is bringing custom sounds, it's because the dev wants it and there's plenty of that on Android too. And btw, tritone (which is not a tritone in a true musical sense I should add) is no longer the default since iOS 7, though it will remain your default if you've upgraded from 6.

Reply Score: 3

RE[5]: poor choice
by WorknMan on Sat 14th Jun 2014 21:06 UTC in reply to "RE[4]: poor choice"
WorknMan Member since:
2005-11-13

And btw, tritone (which is not a tritone in a true musical sense I should add) is no longer the default since iOS 7, though it will remain your default if you've upgraded from 6.


Then why is it (or was it) the default tone for apps like Google Voice and Google Plus in iOS7? Is it like older apps that haven't been updated for iOS7 still using the older iOS6 keyboard?

Reply Score: 2

RE[6]: poor choice
by darknexus on Sun 15th Jun 2014 03:44 UTC in reply to "RE[5]: poor choice"
darknexus Member since:
2008-07-15

Then why is it (or was it) the default tone for apps like Google Voice and Google Plus in iOS7? Is it like older apps that haven't been updated for iOS7 still using the older iOS6 keyboard?

Exactly. Some apps do not actually play the default sound via the API, i.e. they do not query what the default sound actually is but play the tritone instead.

Reply Score: 3

RE[2]: poor choice
by henderson101 on Fri 13th Jun 2014 11:51 UTC in reply to "RE: poor choice"
henderson101 Member since:
2006-05-30

You must've gotten a lemon then.


No. Google "nexus 4 camera reboot" and you will get plenty of hits.

Reply Score: 3

RE[3]: poor choice
by Morgan on Fri 13th Jun 2014 14:51 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: poor choice"
Morgan Member since:
2005-06-29

I can back that up; in the brief time I used a Nexus 4, about every third time I tried to take a picture the phone would either freeze or reboot, or the camera app would crash until I rebooted the phone. I looked into it and found it was a common issue without a timeline for a fix. It's one of the main reasons I stopped using the phone, as the camera is an important tool for me at work.

Edited 2014-06-13 14:51 UTC

Reply Score: 3

RE[4]: poor choice
by pepa on Sun 15th Jun 2014 04:05 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: poor choice"
pepa Member since:
2005-07-08

I've taken loads of pictures on my Nexus 4 and NEVER experienced that. There must be a hardware issue with some batch.

Reply Score: 3

RE[3]: poor choice
by dsmogor on Sun 15th Jun 2014 08:12 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: poor choice"
dsmogor Member since:
2005-09-01

If you're getting reboots on led supported photos it's probably phone HW, namely the power circuit not able to deliver enough peak power.
I get the same effect on my Note from time to time, I got this every time on non-original battery.

Reply Score: 3

RE[4]: poor choice
by henderson101 on Mon 16th Jun 2014 11:39 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: poor choice"
henderson101 Member since:
2006-05-30

If you're getting reboots on led supported photos it's probably phone HW, namely the power circuit not able to deliver enough peak power.


It only started happening around 4.3 for me. It's software for sure.

Reply Score: 2

RE[5]: poor choice
by zima on Mon 16th Jun 2014 20:04 UTC in reply to "RE[4]: poor choice"
zima Member since:
2005-07-06

Or software triggering some hardware fault... ;)

Reply Score: 2

RE: poor choice
by JAlexoid on Fri 13th Jun 2014 15:30 UTC in reply to "poor choice"
JAlexoid Member since:
2009-05-19

Only today, stock camera app crashed taking a picture and rebooted the OS, and this is running 4.4.


And for a good few months opening camera from the lock-screen on iPhone5s would reboot the device immediately. System reboots are very uncommon for Nexus devices, while not uncommon for latest iPhones.

Reply Score: 3

RE: poor choice
by leos on Fri 13th Jun 2014 15:53 UTC in reply to "poor choice"
leos Member since:
2005-09-21

Gotta agree. I was recently playing with a Nexus 10 we have at work. On paper, the thing is more powerful than an iPad (at least pre-Air). Even with 4.4 the experience still sucks on it though. Returning to the home screen often flashes black for a split second before it can manage to load the wallpaper and icons. UI is laggier than iOS, Chrome quite unstable watching videos and often crashed. No thanks.

Reply Score: 0

RE[2]: poor choice
by darknexus on Sat 14th Jun 2014 06:07 UTC in reply to "RE: poor choice"
darknexus Member since:
2008-07-15

Gotta agree. I was recently playing with a Nexus 10 we have at work. On paper, the thing is more powerful than an iPad (at least pre-Air). Even with 4.4 the experience still sucks on it though. Returning to the home screen often flashes black for a split second before it can manage to load the wallpaper and icons. UI is laggier than iOS, Chrome quite unstable watching videos and often crashed. No thanks.

You had a better experience than I did with my Nexus 7. The bloody screen didn't last four months before it cracked. I didn't treat it badly, in fact I had put it down on my desk, walked away from it, and came back and the screen was cracked. No one entered or left the room where I was in that time. My guess is it was a tiny crack that had been there (a flawed device from the start) and it finally gave out. Worse than that, neither Google nor Asus will help me without paying about as much as a new tablet would cost, and they were rude on top of that. They won't even sell me a replacement screen and digitizer which I'm quite capable of installing myself. The after-market replacements have shitty multi-touch support, and the only way to get one is to buy a broken N7 at about half the cost of a new one. I'm not paying $100 US for something broken, thanks.
iPad on the other hand? Going strong for over a year. Not a single problem and, if there was, I'd not get a brush-off from Apple. True it would cost something to get it fixed as the warranty has expired, but they are at least willing to listen to the problem before outright blaming me and hanging up. That's one thing I will give to Apple, top-notch customer service at least for English speakers. I don't know how they are in other languages... might be a fun way to practice my language skills to call Apple in Sweden. ;)

Reply Score: 3

RE[3]: poor choice
by rhetoric.sendmemoney on Sun 15th Jun 2014 14:25 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: poor choice"
rhetoric.sendmemoney Member since:
2006-01-22

Thats your testimonial, I own both the 1st and 2nd gen Nexus 7 and both have been rock solid. That includes development use under extremely heavy processing loads.

Reply Score: 2

RE: poor choice
by ricegf on Sat 14th Jun 2014 13:19 UTC in reply to "poor choice"
ricegf Member since:
2007-04-25

... even stock Android on a Nexus device is flakey... trying to be an uber geek and run some whacky Unix process on your phone... I've sat and developed apps on my phone in AIDE...


I'm wondering if the latter two are the cause of the first.

My Nexus 4 has been just as stable as my Nokia N900 (though your first love always holds a special place in your heart ;-). But I don't run wacky Unix processes or develop more than the occasional Python script on my phone. I also may just be lucky, of course.

In fact, while I bought the Nexus 4 for $200 off-contract specifically so I could dual-boot Ubuntu eventually, I still haven't. My phone is just too central to my life for geek experiments. To my surprise (maybe I'm getting old), I value stability above tech prowess in devices on which I rely frequently.

My collections of cheap ARM bareboards were born to be abused, of course. ;-)

Reply Score: 1

Dasher42
Member since:
2007-04-05

Honestly, I like my Android phone in some ways, but it's a PITA sometimes. Music applications - playback and creation - are nowhere near close what is on the iPhone, and they won't be anytime soon because Android does not manage its latencies nearly as well. Where's the like of AniMoog? Loopy? Thumbjam? There's a reason for that.

The other thing is that I have fits syncing real playback and rating information between my computer and phone. Yes, iTunes is a beast, but its integration is a strength too. What music player do you want? Spotify? PowerAmp? Must you choose good quality playback and equalizing over integration? Are there smart playlists? Ratings being synced both ways? Per-song equalization? I'm sad to say that while iTunes is bloated, the Android/Linux counterparts still miss the things I care about most.

Of course, you probably should go for a Nexus or a custom ROM, just to avoid those battery-guzzling bloatware applications most Android phones are loaded down with.

That said, smart actions and Velis auto-brightness have made battery life far more manageable than I've had on any previous phone. It's a shame about the other stuff.

Reply Score: 6

JAlexoid Member since:
2009-05-19

99% of users don't really give a damn about 20 or 100 ms audio latency. Honestly, it's like this constant annoying tune from the pseudo-audiophiles...

Reply Score: 8

ilovebeer Member since:
2011-08-08

99% of users don't really give a damn about 20 or 100 ms audio latency. Honestly, it's like this constant annoying tune from the pseudo-audiophiles...

Nobody even half credible would complain about 20ms latency. Nobody serious would waste their time with 100ms latency devices. Audio production on an iphone/ipad, or android device is strictly for entertainment purposes.

Reply Score: 1

Dasher42 Member since:
2007-04-05

"99% of users don't really give a damn about 20 or 100 ms audio latency. Honestly, it's like this constant annoying tune from the pseudo-audiophiles...

Nobody even half credible would complain about 20ms latency. Nobody serious would waste their time with 100ms latency devices. Audio production on an iphone/ipad, or android device is strictly for entertainment purposes.
"

Not so. iPads are in use in professional music performances now thanks to apps like Loopy. I have yet to see a single Android device go there, and there's a reason for that. Audio performance and recording means low-latency or real time kernels, and if someone screws up while building a VM-based stack over top of the kernel, that platform is out of the running.

There's no sign that Android is fixing this.

Reply Score: 4

ilovebeer Member since:
2011-08-08

"Nobody even half credible would complain about 20ms latency. Nobody serious would waste their time with 100ms latency devices. Audio production on an iphone/ipad, or android device is strictly for entertainment purposes.


Not so. iPads are in use in professional music performances now thanks to apps like Loopy.
"
You won't see it being used on a real tour and you won't see it being used in a professional recording studio. Regardless of someone screwing around with Loopy on an ipad during some performance, tablet/smartphone audio is a toy/gimmick. Nothing more.

I have yet to see a single Android device go there, and there's a reason for that. Audio performance and recording means low-latency or real time kernels, and if someone screws up while building a VM-based stack over top of the kernel, that platform is out of the running.

There's no sign that Android is fixing this.

In the performance audio world, meaning live performance and/or recording, latency is serious business. This is why you have dedicated & specialized audio hardware. Tablets and smartphones are neither designed nor well-suited for the needs of professional audio. They're good for people who like to screw around with audio and/or record stuff in their bedroom.

Reply Score: 2

BushLin Member since:
2011-01-26

Not so. iPads are in use in professional music performances now thanks to apps like Loopy.


I'm sure you could find an example of a musician using an iPad during a performance but back to the that 99% of users point...

Reply Score: 4

ilovebeer Member since:
2011-08-08

Somebody somewhere has, sure. People have hacked Nintendo Gameboys (among other things like that) to give them access to the sid chips, and have used those in one way or another. Tinkering is present in any field. Novelties will always be there but just being in existence doesn't qualify it as anything beyond that.

Reply Score: 3

JAlexoid Member since:
2009-05-19

There's no sign that Android is fixing this.

And that's perfectly fine. iOS dominates there, and let it dominate. It's built better in media production.
But some people then extrapolate that to the point that the whole platform is crap, because building audiovisual media production apps on Android is much harder.

Reply Score: 3

leos Member since:
2005-09-21

99% of users don't really give a damn about 20 or 100 ms audio latency. Honestly, it's like this constant annoying tune from the pseudo-audiophiles...


You clearly don't know anything about music then. Low audio latency is critical for creating music. This has nothing to do with audiophiles, any human creating music will notice 100ms immediately. Basic interaction design.

Reply Score: 2

JAlexoid Member since:
2009-05-19

You clearly don't know anything about music then.

And you clearly don't know anything about what people do with their devices. People that professionally do music production use iOS, because it's the best.
But this crap about how important 100 vs 20 ms latency is coming from people that have nothing better to do.

Here's the dirty secret - it's exceptionally unimportant to 99% of users.

Reply Score: 4

ilovebeer Member since:
2011-08-08

People that professionally do music production use iOS, because it's the best.

People doing music professionally don't use iOS at all because ipads & iphones in the music world amount to nothing more than toys/gimmicks/novelties.

But this crap about how important 100 vs 20 ms latency is coming from people that have nothing better to do.

Latency is extremely important and addressed by specialized hardware, as I've already pointed out. 20ms is fine in production and live performance. 100ms is not. The only type of person who thinks thats crap is someone who has no clue what they're talking about.

Here's the dirty secret - it's exceptionally unimportant to 99% of users.

Yes, because 99% of users aren't doing music professionally and 99% of users are clueless on these subjects.

Reply Score: 3

Android is more than enough
by Mr. Dee on Fri 13th Jun 2014 02:14 UTC
Mr. Dee
Member since:
2005-11-13

In 2013 I was saving enough to go all out Apple, from iPhone to iPad to a 27 inch iMac, I wanted the entire ecosystem. Approaching Fall 2013, my desire kinda waned and I ultimately postponed my purchases. In early 2014 my brother got a first gen Galaxy Note as a gift, he liked it but wasn't ready to use it, considered it to be too big. He preferred his Blackberry or the iPhone 4S he had prior to selling it. So he decided to let me keep it and use it until he was ready to take it back or sell it. I decided to go for it and installed my SIM.

Its ironic, because it looks like Android is now the Windows of Smartphone OSs.
Since then, I have honestly asked myself what I have been missing on iOS? Nothing pretty much. I own an iPod Touch 3rd gen I was using since 2009 for my mobile needs. To be honest, Android just feels more powerful in your hands. Its like a desktop OS done right on a mobile OS. I was just amazed, downloading music, videos with apps that I am regularly accustomed to using on my Windows PC. I could easily find them on the device use the different apps to view and listen the media I download using Chrome for Android.

Another thing I like is the centralized notifications, quick access to Wi-Fi, no digging through menus. What I don't like is the keyboard in Android 4.1. iOS has a way more intelligent keyboard, I am thinking about installing Swift to see if it will change the experience. Apart from this, the Notification Center is a big plus. Settings on the device can be intimidating and confusing at times, I prefer a lot of the Settings options on iOS.

As with Samsung, there two of the same type of apps on the device and that's a minor problem. Overall, Android has certainly caught up, just as Windows caught up with the Mac OS at 3.0 and surpassed it at Windows 95.

With all the essential mobile apps available: Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, Microsoft apps, I use Outlook.com, BBM, honestly, why do I need iOS again? Yes, the iPhone is a beautiful device, but at the end of the day, its about using the device and much of that is software. Making a post FB using an iPhone vs a Android device is no different. Which ultimately comes down to cost.

Money talks, the local cellular carrier in my country is selling cheap Alcatel Android phones for what would be $69 US with 3 months free 4G Internet. You would be shocked the amount teachers and students I see everyday with one. They are doing their FB, Tweeting, Instagram, Yahoo Mail just fine on it. Its not about the OS for them, its about the apps and as far as that is concerned, the majority of what persons need are on Android.

Reply Score: 3

Apps.
by gan17 on Fri 13th Jun 2014 03:09 UTC
gan17
Member since:
2008-06-03

For me it's simple - Apps.

I dislike the way Apple's runs it's ecosystem, iOS annoys me on a daily basis, and the recent deal with that shit headphone company has made me feel dirty each time I pick up my iPhone.

But the quality and variety of the apps available in the iOS App Store is a lot better than Android's. A lot, lot better. Most of them look a lot better too - even Google's apps for iOS tend to look better than they do for Android.

People can talk about freedom all they want, but to me, the ability to go and download an app without having to worry about whether it works on my device is more liberating than anything Google Play has ever done for me.

That Beats deal still makes me wanna puke blood though.

Edited 2014-06-13 03:11 UTC

Reply Score: 0

RE: Apps.
by JAlexoid on Fri 13th Jun 2014 15:35 UTC in reply to "Apps."
JAlexoid Member since:
2009-05-19

the ability to go and download an app without having to worry about whether it works on my device is more liberating than anything Google Play has ever done for me.

You are not an iPhone4/4S user then?

Reply Score: 1

RE[2]: Apps.
by leos on Fri 13th Jun 2014 15:56 UTC in reply to "RE: Apps."
leos Member since:
2005-09-21

"the ability to go and download an app without having to worry about whether it works on my device is more liberating than anything Google Play has ever done for me.

You are not an iPhone4/4S user then?
"

All the apps on the app store work on the iPhone 4, which runs the latest iOS. Of course except games which need more power than the iPhone 4 has.

Reply Score: 1

RE[3]: Apps.
by JAlexoid on Sat 14th Jun 2014 09:26 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Apps."
JAlexoid Member since:
2009-05-19

All the apps on the app store work on the iPhone 4, which runs the latest iOS. Of course except games which need more power than the iPhone 4 has.


So... In fact, not all the apps. And as an iPhone4S user, I can attest that a lot of apps run like their game counterparts - like s**t. And iOS7 made them worse...

Reply Score: 2

Android + Linux (not Apple + Windows)
by benali72 on Fri 13th Jun 2014 03:33 UTC
benali72
Member since:
2008-05-03

To each their own, but for me, if you want a consumer system controlled more by a corporation than yourself, go Apple for handhelds and Windows for laptops & desktops. If you want more freedom and fewer controls & restraints, go Android for handhelds and Linux for laptops & desktops. I'm not into that consumer stuff built for planned obsolescence.

Reply Score: 0

leos Member since:
2005-09-21

To each their own, but for me, if you want a consumer system controlled more by a corporation than yourself, go Apple for handhelds and Windows for laptops & desktops. If you want more freedom and fewer controls & restraints, go Android for handhelds and Linux for laptops & desktops. I'm not into that consumer stuff built for planned obsolescence.


Or seen another way: If you want to have a device that is designed to serve you more ads, get Android. If you want a device designed to be a good device (and thus get you to buy more devices), get iPhone.

As for planned obsolescence, Apple is much better at supporting their old hardware than any Android manufacturer including Nexus devices, so that is just plain wrong.

Reply Score: 1

darknexus Member since:
2008-07-15

As for planned obsolescence, Apple is much better at supporting their old hardware than any Android manufacturer including Nexus devices, so that is just plain wrong.

Seconded. Even the iPhone 3gs got iOS 6, a good while after the Nexus One stopped getting any updates at all and the N1 had better specs.

Reply Score: 2

JAlexoid Member since:
2009-05-19

Seconded. Even the iPhone 3gs got iOS 6, a good while after the Nexus One stopped getting any updates at all and the N1 had better specs.


Except storage, you mean. N1 - 512mb. 3gs 8GB+

Reply Score: 2

JAlexoid Member since:
2009-05-19

As for planned obsolescence, Apple is much better at supporting their old hardware than any Android manufacturer including Nexus devices, so that is just plain wrong.

That is barely true. My Galaxy Nexus after 2.5 years and skipping last update runs as smoothly as it did on launch day. My iPhone4, however, runs like a dying horse...(I've had my iPhone4 for 3 years)

Reply Score: 3

I do miss my iTunes Playlist
by Mr. Dee on Fri 13th Jun 2014 04:19 UTC
Mr. Dee
Member since:
2005-11-13

I curate a lot of my music into Playlist on iTunes, so far I have not gotten that over, I know its possible, but I have not gotten around how to do so.

Reply Score: 2

I love Android hardware but hate Android OS
by sergio on Fri 13th Jun 2014 05:42 UTC
sergio
Member since:
2005-07-06

Phones like HTC One or Xiaomi MI2 are incredible even better than Apple phones IMHO... but for me Android OS is a big fat no no, It's too complicated, bloated with features that I don't care. And the worst part: you are obligated to use Google services for everything. Sorry Google Inc, but thanks, I don't need your generosity.

I love two things in a product: simplicity and openness. iOS gives me only the first one but I will keep an eye on FirefoxOS, it's a very interesting project and _really_ open (not a Google-trap like Android). HTC + Firefox OS could be a killer product for me.

In the meantime, I will keep using Apple phones because they "just work" (for now at least, because Apple began to add stupid features like Android too... and that's a really bad symptom). ;)

Reply Score: 1

Thom_Holwerda Member since:
2005-06-29

And the worst part: you are obligated to use Google services for everything.


This is quite obviously completely and utterly not true. Running Android without Google services is super-easy - custom ROM, don't flash GApps, but instead pick one of the million other application stores, or just sideload everything.

Try running iOS without Apple services. Good luck with that.

Reply Score: 7

Morgan Member since:
2005-06-29

This is quite obviously completely and utterly not true.


Indeed, my first Android phone was a Motorola Cliq, which positively sucked running the stock MotoBlur ROM. I flashed CM7 and used alternatives to Google apps for everything, via F-Droid and Aptoide. It still wasn't a great phone, but it was usable at that point.

Reply Score: 5

NeoX Member since:
2006-02-19

Running Android without Google services is super-easy - custom ROM, don't flash GApps, but instead pick one of the million other application stores, or just sideload everything.

Yes, for sure. When I used an xperia play as my daily phone it was nice to be able to flash between different ROMS.

However one point I think you have to keep in mind is that your average Joe phone user is not going to be able to flash his phone nor would they likely know you can on some phones. So with the stock Google/name your manufacture GUI, you are going to be tied to Google services.

Honestly there is a risk either way but seeing how Apple controls the devices and the software and the cloud services and is not in business solely to make money off my data, I prefer Apple.

Reply Score: 1

torp Member since:
2010-08-10

"Running Android without Google services is super-easy - custom ROM, don't flash GApps, but instead pick one of the million other application stores, or just sideload everything.

Yes, for sure. When I used an xperia play as my daily phone it was nice to be able to flash between different ROMS.

However one point I think you have to keep in mind is that your average Joe phone user is not going to be able to flash his phone nor would they likely know you can on some phones. So with the stock Google/name your manufacture GUI, you are going to be tied to Google services.

Honestly there is a risk either way but seeing how Apple controls the devices and the software and the cloud services and is not in business solely to make money off my data, I prefer Apple.
"

Not only your average Joe. I'm a developer (including custom Linux kernels on ARM), but I'd rather do my actual development instead of tweaking the device I bought for phone calls and web browsing.

Reply Score: 2

sergio Member since:
2005-07-06

This is quite obviously completely and utterly not true. Running Android without Google services is super-easy - custom ROM, don't flash GApps, but instead pick one of the million other application stores, or just sideload everything.



You are not being serious... following your logic, iOS is very open too if you do a jailbreak!!

Regarding the usage of iOS without Apple services... I don't have problem with Apple services really. Apple business is selling phones and headphones not people's privacy.

Google is whose trying to be Skynet here, our privacy is their product. I don't need their free "goodies". No thanks.

BTW I will be very glad to switch to Firefox OS when it's done, a real open OS without creepy companies with hidden agendas behind it.

In the meantime, iOS is the only sane choice for me. I prefer to pay for "just work" products not betas.

Edited 2014-06-14 09:47 UTC

Reply Score: 2

6month follow up
by REM2000 on Fri 13th Jun 2014 07:56 UTC
REM2000
Member since:
2006-07-25

Sorry if you've already mentioned it but a 6month follow up to this post would be good.

Ive made the jump from iPhone to Galaxy Note2 in 2012, i used ChromeBook, Galaxy Note 10.1 as a replacement for my iPad, however in the end i went back to the iPhone.

I went back for following reasons,

Reliability, my iPhone 5 is a lot more reliable than the Galaxy Note2 (which i had replaced under warranty so it wasn't just that GN2). It would slow down after a couple of months, almost like a SSD lacking TRIM. It would randomly crash, reboot etc.. Battery life was somedays excellent, other days it wouldn't last more than half a day, all with the same usage patterns.

There is a bug on Samsung Android phones that when you have headphones plugged in and sound on (i.e. not vibrate) text alerts, facebooks alerts, phone call ring tones etc.. will play through both headphones and the phone itself. I went and spoke to samsung themselves who were able to replicate it on all their phones and offer no way to fix it apart from keep my phone on vibrate (still does it on Galaxy S4's)

Some of the apps at the time were not as easy to use as the iPhone/iPod version.

Phone aside the next was the eco system, i am pretty much all in the apple ecosystem, i love iTunes, i think it works well managing my media, of course i wish it would run a little faster however it seems to run ok. All my media is converted to itunes format anyway as it's a good format for my needs, i have pretty small files which look ok on TV but are great for the iPad and iPhone, due to their small file size i can manage a lot of media without having to create a massive storage infrastructure to keep it stored. The MP4 is pretty universal so my Synology NAS will read them fine, my PS3, Samsung Smart TV all read the files fine.

My apps such as Nike Fuelband are locked into Apple, my journal app Day One is locked into it, Things! for project management etc.. These are all apps which are available for my iPhone, iPad and Mac's, all sync together and all work well.

However this is just my opinion, everyone has a story of why they are using their particular eco-system, personally out of the big three, Apple, Google and Microsoft we have reached a level of maturity, in that whatever platform you pick, youre gonna get your apps, music, email, calendar contacts and social integration, when you consider these core elements which make up the 90% it's the last 10% which makes the decision, the individual i like doing xyz with my phone, some people like Micro-SD's some people don't etc..

Things i miss from Android is the Filesystem, i would love to have the ability to wifi, bluetooth files from/to my device, like it was said in the article it's like having a pocket desktop computer.

Miss the swype keyboard, however this should hopefully be fixed in iOS8.

Things i wish all phone manufactures would do, stop chasing thinness, i would love my iPhone 5 to be a little thicker at the cost of having a battery which would last 3 days instead of 1.

Reply Score: 3

Comment by olejon
by olejon on Fri 13th Jun 2014 08:09 UTC
olejon
Member since:
2012-08-12

Good article. Just a quick tip: There's an option in iTunes to manage music and video manually, without syncing. It's the first setting I change. So many people doesn't know this.

http://support.apple.com/kb/ht1535

Reply Score: 3

RE: Comment by olejon
by Adam S on Fri 13th Jun 2014 11:08 UTC in reply to "Comment by olejon"
Adam S Member since:
2005-04-01

That still requires the content to be in iTunes, it just doesn't require the whole Sync process. I'm trying to get my kids' content out of my iTunes, particularly huge movies that have to be converted into an iTunes friendly format, then stored in my Library.

Reply Score: 2

RE[2]: Comment by olejon
by darknexus on Sat 14th Jun 2014 05:16 UTC in reply to "RE: Comment by olejon"
darknexus Member since:
2008-07-15

That still requires the content to be in iTunes, it just doesn't require the whole Sync process. I'm trying to get my kids' content out of my iTunes, particularly huge movies that have to be converted into an iTunes friendly format, then stored in my Library.

I hate iTunes as well (at least the PC and Mac side application), however there is one upside to it supporting a limited range of formats on the mobile device itself, and that is hardware acceleration. True, Android can play damn near anything you throw at it. So can iOS, with the right apps such as Goodplayer (though getting data on and off some of those apps is more complicated than it needs to be). However, what I quickly realized was that if I attempt to play a format that is not hardware accelerated (regardless of platform) I get a massive battery drain in the case of videos. I knew it would drain the battery faster, but just how much faster came as quite a shock. It's much less so for audio only media, of course. However, without looking up your hardware specs for your Android device (if they even tell you) you really have no idea what formats can be accelerated. It varies from device to device. At least with iDevices, it's quite clear cut which formats are supported by the hardware and which ones are not and you can decide what to convert and what to leave unchanged.

Reply Score: 4

RE[3]: Comment by olejon
by _txf_ on Sat 14th Jun 2014 14:05 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Comment by olejon"
_txf_ Member since:
2008-03-17


I hate iTunes as well (at least the PC and Mac side application), however there is one upside to it supporting a limited range of formats on the mobile device itself, and that is hardware acceleration.



The thing if an iDevice does not like the container, it insists on completely converting the media file, regardless if the encoding is the same.

Either way most common formats are hardware accelerated, so there shouldn't be any need for that nonsense on most files.

Reply Score: 4

RE[2]: Comment by olejon
by weckart on Sat 14th Jun 2014 20:31 UTC in reply to "RE: Comment by olejon"
weckart Member since:
2006-01-11

It doesn't if you select to manually manage your devices. It just needs iTunes to mount the iOS FS so that media can be copied over. I just drag and drop from Finder onto my device's icon in iTunes after having deselected autoimporting into iTunes. Not a single piece of media has been added into my iTunes database.

Maybe it doesn't work as well under Windows but in OSX there is no problem.

Reply Score: 2

RE[3]: Comment by olejon
by darknexus on Sun 15th Jun 2014 04:13 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Comment by olejon"
darknexus Member since:
2008-07-15

Maybe it doesn't work as well under Windows but in OSX there is no problem.

That's a partial solution only. I still can't pull my media back off the device unless it was purchased through the iTunes Store. Plus, only certain types of media can be managed that way (music, videos, and photos). Plus might I remind you that files must be converted into appropriate formats? This is not real drag and drop management.
Brings up an interesting question though, why the hell can't we just mount the damn thing in the Finder? All this tight integration and yet they haven't managed something that obvious.

Reply Score: 3

RE[4]: Comment by olejon
by weckart on Sun 15th Jun 2014 15:28 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: Comment by olejon"
weckart Member since:
2006-01-11

There are quite a few third party apps that allow you to move data off your iDevice, such as the venerable Senuti to iPhoneView or iExplorer on Windows. These also access things like contacts, notes etc.

The reason it won't mount in the Finder is that iOS FS is encrypted (I think) and the decrypter is embedded within iTunes or hacked versions in third party apps.

Edited 2014-06-15 15:30 UTC

Reply Score: 2

RE[5]: Comment by olejon
by darknexus on Sun 15th Jun 2014 18:32 UTC in reply to "RE[4]: Comment by olejon"
darknexus Member since:
2008-07-15

There are quite a few third party apps that allow you to move data off your iDevice, such as the venerable Senuti to iPhoneView or iExplorer on Windows. These also access things like contacts, notes etc.

Not all data though, and there's no guarantee these third-party apps will continue to be developed or support new devices and os versions. Most of these apps still don't let me move audiobooks on and off my devices, for example.

Reply Score: 3

Timing?
by syngularyx on Fri 13th Jun 2014 08:33 UTC
syngularyx
Member since:
2012-02-01

Your timing seems totally wrong.
I would have waited until some new features/services from Google. Compared to what Apple showed last week, it seems iOS finally implemented what was still missing and added some pretty interesting stuff.

BTW, you said Android, but on which hardware?

Reply Score: 1

RE: Timing?
by Adam S on Fri 13th Jun 2014 11:17 UTC in reply to "Timing?"
Adam S Member since:
2005-04-01

After a LOT of research, I decided on the Moto X. Yes, it's a year old.

The Nexus 5 and HTC One are just a step too big for one handed use, which automatically disqualifies anything 5" or above, so bye-bye OnePlus One, G3, X+1, etc. I really wanted 4.7" for now. Informal reviews show everyone that I know who has one still loves it, so I'm giving it a shot.

Reply Score: 2

I hope you have your battery extender...
by torp on Fri 13th Jun 2014 08:45 UTC
torp
Member since:
2010-08-10

If you want to use those "full of life" widgets.
Back when I had an Android phone they were fun - "who's eaten 90% of my battery this morning" fun.

Also, I really hope you're not getting a vendor skinned phone if you like UI consistency.

As a switcher to iOS after 2 Android phones, my opinion is that all that widget/notification bling is just useless after the initial "oooh shiny" feeling fades. On the contrary, I have my phone set up to not f*ing bother me except for phone calls. It's much better for your concentration than having a facebook-like deluge of notifications and pretty widgets ;)

Reply Score: 1

I have both
by cropr on Fri 13th Jun 2014 09:22 UTC
cropr
Member since:
2006-02-14

As a app developer, I have currently an iPad2, an iPhone5c, 4 android phones and a Nexus7 tablet. I do like the iOS ecosystem for the hardware quality and for the smooth, consistent way of working. But some aspects are annoying or outdated. The virtual keyboard works OK if you don't know anything else, but once you experienced a Android keyboard, you suddenly realize that the iOS implementation is mediocre. (This should be fixed in iOS 8). As a power user I have some other pain points in iOS: no way to define a reply-to address in the mail app, no way to define a SSID in the personal hotspot, lack of widgets, iCloud. The last one is a real PITA to work with if you also have non Apple devices.
The main issue with Android are the non removable software shipped by the phone manufacturer, and the mediocre quality of some apps and widgets. Some widgets are really great, productive and not battery unfriendly, but others are just shit. It takes time to find out which ones are good, The one I really like is Wifi network chooser. It takes on iOS 5 times as long to choose a an available wifi network if you are a public place where you haven't used Wifi before.
I don't see the update cycle for Android Phones as a big issue. The phone is in most case faster replaced/lost/broken than the need for an OS upgrade. However for tablets this is defenitely a negative point.

Reply Score: 1

RE: I have both
by BushLin on Sat 14th Jun 2014 00:26 UTC in reply to "I have both"
BushLin Member since:
2011-01-26

The main issue with Android are the non removable software shipped by the phone manufacturer...


So you're an app developer with 5 android devices but haven't worked out you can delete system apk files and they're gone? (root access required)

Reply Score: 3

Comment by majipoor
by majipoor on Fri 13th Jun 2014 12:13 UTC
majipoor
Member since:
2009-01-22

I am always amazed to see how some people feels the needs to justify their own choice and try to explain why this one is better than the other one.

I am a 100% iOS and OS X user, but I also know this simple fact: whether it is iOS, Android, WP or whatever modern mobile OS, you ALWAYS will be able to find better this or worst that in any OS. And most of the time, this is a completely purely subjective opinion based on your own expectations (and it is just fine this way).

I did choose Apple's ecosystem and I don't see the point of telling people why (unless they ask me in which case I always insist on the subjectivity of this choice). One of the reason is that I don't like Google's business model which has nothing to do with Android: should I expect that anybody care about that?

Moreover, the strength of one OS in someone's eye may be its weakness for someone else: is it that difficult to understand that some people actually prefer a curated walled garden as some prefer a formal garden to a landscape garden? Does it make a landscape garden better because it is more "free"?

Edited 2014-06-13 12:14 UTC

Reply Score: 1

RE: Comment by majipoor
by kwan_e on Fri 13th Jun 2014 12:22 UTC in reply to "Comment by majipoor"
kwan_e Member since:
2007-02-18

I am always amazed to see how some people feels the needs to justify their own choice and try to explain why this one is better than the other one.


I'm always amazed why people like to read things they hate and then complain about having to read things they hate.

Reply Score: 8

RE[2]: Comment by majipoor
by theosib on Fri 13th Jun 2014 12:47 UTC in reply to "RE: Comment by majipoor"
theosib Member since:
2006-03-02

"I am always amazed to see how some people feels the needs to justify their own choice and try to explain why this one is better than the other one.


I'm always amazed why people like to read things they hate and then complain about having to read things they hate.
"

I’m not surprised at all. Part of the draw of websites like Slashdot, Ars Technica, and OSNews is the comments section, where people can discuss their opinions. It’s fun, even if 90% of it is whining and bitching. ;)

Reply Score: 4

RE: Comment by majipoor
by Adam S on Fri 13th Jun 2014 14:51 UTC in reply to "Comment by majipoor"
Adam S Member since:
2005-04-01

I am always amazed to see how some people feels the needs to justify their own choice and try to explain why this one is better than the other one.


Dude, you came to a site, read an article called "Editorial" that *starts* with the sentence, "I'm not trying to convince you to switch."

It's my personal chronicle that several people I know wanted to read. If you don't, kindly pass by. I mean, why are you on OSNews at all if you don't want to discuss the merits of different OSes?

Reply Score: 4

iPhone users are lazy
by theosib on Fri 13th Jun 2014 12:45 UTC
theosib
Member since:
2006-03-02

Or busy with more important things to worry about.

I’ve said it many times before: If I want an Android phone, I’ll read a dozen reviews and compare specs and look at the vendor’s reputation for pushing OS updates, etc., etc. And then I can pick the BEST phone. On the other hand, if I buy an iPhone, I’m buying a GOOD phone. Not the best, but I can guarantee that I’m NOT buying a BAD phone. And by doing this, I’ve saved myself the effort of reading all those reviews. Instead, I can spend my time doing research or pushing code to GitHub.

For the same reason, I use a Mac on my desktop. As a developer and researcher, I prefer Linux (so I have plenty of Linux servers I get into remotely). But with a Mac, it just takes less work to deal with basic administrative tasks. I remember when it was a horrendous pain to get Linux to work on wifi, and even if you could get it to connect, there was no auto-discovery; you had to configure everything manually. Yes, Linux distros are WAY better about that now. But at that time, I was using a Mac, so I managed to mostly avoid that issue. In other words, I never had to waste time and hair-pulling on that problem.

Reply Score: 2

Considering the reverse switch.
by dsmogor on Fri 13th Jun 2014 13:04 UTC
dsmogor
Member since:
2005-09-01

After ~3 years with Android, I finally got to understand the Apple ecosystem major value.
It's not the HW.
It's not the OS itself.
It's not the number of apps.
It's not the integration.
It's not the content(nonexistent in my country).
It's the developer culture that dictates that all devices get properly supported and usability tested in context of each device peculiarities (incl. physical size). The sheer amount of work that it takes to support Android variability has demoralized app devs to the point the quality standards within the ecosystem are really low compared to similar IOS apps.
Event signature Android apps show annoying bugs from time to time.
If there would be number of 1st tier devices that devs care about 1st order, I'd settle for that, unfortunately such tie only exists between Google devices and Google apps and that's a too little.

Edited 2014-06-13 13:04 UTC

Reply Score: 0

Nice
by ModeenF on Fri 13th Jun 2014 13:57 UTC
ModeenF
Member since:
2005-07-06

Nice reading, Have used Android before but after I bought a BlackBerry z10 I can't go back. I only get mad trying to use my wife's Sony z1 and more trying to do something on a IPhone.

On my phone I just swipe with my finger on the screen, no button click to unlock, close a app or anything.

Swipe up and right you get in to your mail/messages. Only swipe up will show running app. Swipe down will show your other status. If the phones locked you can still read messages if you click on them.. It just works. z10 has no fast hardware but the os make's it fast. Thes days I also can run Android app without converting them (I do need the files thou).

Before 10.2.1 there was a lot of problems and with 10.3 it will even get better ;)

So test a BlackBerry ;)

Reply Score: 1

RE: Nice
by Morgan on Fri 13th Jun 2014 14:39 UTC in reply to "Nice"
Morgan Member since:
2005-06-29

I wish my carrier supported Blackberry phones, I'd definitely get a Z10 to weigh against my 8XT. I was a Blackberry user before Android was commonplace, and I've always been comfortable with them. I can only imagine how nice the new BB10 OS is.

Reply Score: 2

RE: Nice
by leos on Fri 13th Jun 2014 16:09 UTC in reply to "Nice"
leos Member since:
2005-09-21

Nice reading, Have used Android before but after I bought a BlackBerry z10 I can't go back. I only get mad trying to use my wife's Sony z1 and more trying to do something on a IPhone.

On my phone I just swipe with my finger on the screen, no button click to unlock, close a app or anything.


Agreed! They really did a nice job with the interface and it's the one feature I wish they had on the iPhone.

Reply Score: 3

v Why Do I Read These Posts
by pointman on Fri 13th Jun 2014 14:08 UTC
RE: Why Do I Read These Posts
by Morgan on Fri 13th Jun 2014 14:43 UTC in reply to "Why Do I Read These Posts"
Morgan Member since:
2005-06-29

There's absolutely nothing wrong with loving Apple and/or their products. Use what works for you, and don't take the article to heart as it is one man's experience, not your own. This article's comments are full of Android, iOS, Windows Phone, and even Blackberry users, who all get what they need out of their chosen platform.

Not one of these platforms is superior overall to another; only when you drill down to the individual user's wants and needs do you find one coming out on top of the rest.

And if the day comes that you realize you prefer something else to iOS, don't feel bad about that either. Change can be good, even if it's uncomfortable.

Reply Score: 6

RE[2]: Why Do I Read These Posts
by ilovebeer on Fri 13th Jun 2014 15:59 UTC in reply to "RE: Why Do I Read These Posts"
ilovebeer Member since:
2011-08-08

In addition, a persons previous favorite may not be same when it's time to get something new and you look at the current offerings. It reminds me of the Forbes top earners list - the names on the list are usually the same but their position/ranking varies from year to year.

Reply Score: 2

language switching: use Hacker's Keyboard
by tidux on Fri 13th Jun 2014 15:26 UTC
tidux
Member since:
2011-08-13

> better than Android, arguably, given the switch button is on the keyboard

You can configure Hacker's Keyboard (available on F-Droid as well as the Play Store) to display a language-switch button, as long as you have all the languages installed. Hacker's Keyboard's main claim to fame, however, is the ability to display *every single key* of a standard PC keyboard in landscape mode. This makes using SSH apps on Android tolerable on a phone, and moderately useful on a tablet, without requiring an external keyboard.

Reply Score: 4

darknexus Member since:
2008-07-15

> better than Android, arguably, given the switch button is on the keyboard

I don't think that's what was meant. It wasn't a language switch button that was wanted but an input method switch button. iOS and Android both already have switch language buttons on their stock keyboard if you've set up more than one language. You can configure the google keyboard to have an input method switch button as well, but whether you'll be able to have one to switch again depends on the keyboard to which you've moved.

Hacker's Keyboard's main claim to fame, however, is the ability to display *every single key* of a standard PC keyboard in landscape mode. This makes using SSH apps on Android tolerable on a phone, and moderately useful on a tablet, without requiring an external keyboard.

The Google keyboard has actually had this for a while. You just need to go into its advanced settings and add an input style for any language as "pc" rather than picking qwerty/qwertz/dvorak/etc. Enable that style in your languages list and disable the default for that language and you're done. No need for a third-party keyboard to get this functionality.

Reply Score: 3

Very well said.
by snip3rm00n on Fri 13th Jun 2014 15:31 UTC
snip3rm00n
Member since:
2011-06-08

This article definitely hits some of my peeves of the iOS platform on the head. I especially hated that I had to use iTunes to get material onto my old iPhone 4s. Everything from photos and music to even contacts from my previous phone at the time (HTC Hero, which itself was complete utter tripe but that was a fault of Sprint, not the device). The iTunes iDevice management system is very flawed and unintuitive. I can't count how many times iTunes wanted to resync everything on the phone just because I made a change to the behavior on one of the iDevice's tabs.

One of my other biggest qualms about the iOS platform is the fact that there is nothing truly customizable about it. Sure you can tweak settings and such for certain applications but you cannot go into the depth of customization that Android and other mobile OSes give you. If I don't want the flat, over driven white, and painfully bright interface that modern technology companies push on to all our devices like its the solution to all of the industries problems then I can just go into the settings and change it. If there isn't a setting to change it then I can download an app, extension, or launcher that will let me change it.

I do love being able to install third-party applications on my Galaxy S4. I'm not limited to any one app store or even to the need of having an app store. If I find a game or utility written by an indie-developer then I can install it on my device just by going into the settings and the changing the "Unknown Sources" setting to on. This certainly makes testing apps made by the company I work for a breeze.

Lastly, one of the key things about Android that I like is if I don't like or agree with the current stock OS on my device then I can flash a custom ROM into my phone and give it a try. If that ROM doesn't suit my taste then I can just flash a different ROM and keep going until I find one that's just right.

Now, I'm willing to grant that iOS has some ups to it. With the restrictions in it, there is less of a chance of getting a rogue app that will eat your battery life. With an iOS device the possibility of contracting a virus is slimmer (but not impossible). And if you want an in-depth level of customization you could attempt to jailbreak it and keep your fingers crossed that your phone isn't part of the X% that bricks in the process. However, the fact of the matter is that iOS has been behind the curve for a long time. When I saw the iOS 8 WWDC conference all I could think to myself was "Congrats, iOS, you've finally evolved to the level of Android 2.0 Eclair."

Edited 2014-06-13 15:32 UTC

Reply Score: 7

v Article.
by leos on Fri 13th Jun 2014 16:06 UTC
roverrobot
Member since:
2006-07-23

Android seems shaping up quite nicely. But the main problem I can see is its fragmentation. Each cellphone provider rollout their updates on their own pace, and most of the time, none at all.

I have got a cheap (as in free) Galaxy SIII mini earlier this year from one of a major Canada cellular provider (Fido). And guess, what, when everyone is saying how great Android 4.4 is, my device come with 4.2. And, it is a new model, so it is not fully supported by CM.

It gets the work done with a long list of annoyance., comparing to an iPhone 4S that my wife owns. You know, even her iPhone 4 runs the latest iOS7. So, I am not sure if the heartbeat bug will affect me as there has been absolutely no update every since I got the android.

Reply Score: 1

Always Android
by Anonymous Penguin on Fri 13th Jun 2014 23:23 UTC
Anonymous Penguin
Member since:
2005-07-06

Always Androids phones and Tablets here, after Nokia was no longer a viable option. Always Samsung. I actually like some of the impovements Samsung makes to Android, except for the bloatware, but I believe they learned their lesson after the S4

Reply Score: 2

Hardware quality
by sb56637 on Sat 14th Jun 2014 04:13 UTC
sb56637
Member since:
2006-05-11

Interesting that you might also have defective Apple hardware, given the crashing issues. Because I'm getting pretty fed up with Android devices. I have owned 6 so far... and 4 of them were defective. Guess which is the only one that continues to work apart from my new replacement device? The ORIGINAL HTC Dream G1. Here's my Android experience:

* Bought a used HTC Dream G1. Still own it, still works great.

* Bought a Motorola Droid 2 Global. Within a year of light use and **meticulous** care (never dropped or banged up), the touch screen stopped working.

* Bought a Samsung Captivate Glide. Defective out of the box, only works for about an hour before the screen stops responding and eventually the device goes dead. Pull the battery, let it "rest" for a day, put the battery back, and it works for a while and then dies again.

* Bought another Samsung Captivate Glide. After about a year of moderate use and **meticulous** care (never once dropped or banged up, looks like new) it stopped booting up and basically acted like the first Captivate Glide.

* Bought an HTC Inspire 4G. Out of the box, the microphone wasn't functioning.

Now I'm on a Samsung Galaxy S3. We'll see how many months this one lasts...

Edited 2014-06-14 04:14 UTC

Reply Score: 2

RE: Hardware quality
by rhetoric.sendmemoney on Sun 15th Jun 2014 14:22 UTC in reply to "Hardware quality"
rhetoric.sendmemoney Member since:
2006-01-22

I love testimonials. I have had the exact opposite experience. I started with the original Droid and have had a Droid 2 Global, HTC Thunderbolt, and now a droid Bionic. The ONLY phone I had any issues with was the HTC. That had the infuriating random reboot bug that it took them nearly a year to correct. Aside from that my devices have been rock solid. Including my 1st and 2nd gen Nexus 7s.

Reply Score: 2

I made the jump to Android recently
by darknexus on Sat 14th Jun 2014 05:46 UTC
darknexus
Member since:
2008-07-15

and a more mixed set of feelings I could not have. I love the widgets and the personalization I can do (setting a default browser alone is more than awesome after iOS). I even get Firefox, all synced up with my Mac and most of my extensions to boot. Central account management is awesome as well, though some apps really don't take advantage of it when they should (ES File Explorer, I'm looking at you). My moto G works well most of the time, but it's the times when it doesn't that really make me wonder if I did the right thing or if I'll end up going back to iOS in the end.

The problems:
* Battery life is erratic in a way that multitasking cannot explain. My battery can literally jump from 60% to 1% in a second, and I've calibrated it over and over again. This one looks like a hardware problem, and a common one, with the G so I'll not lay the blame at Android for this one. Still, it is a serious problem for me when I want to use my phone and suddenly can't because the battery has unexpectedly died. Motorola/Lenovo are no help (more on that later).
* One more G-specific issue. This one affects all G's. If your battery does drop to 0, you won't be able to turn your phone back on even when charged without going into the recovery menu. Note your battery must drop to a flat 0 before this will happen. This is due to the crappy charging circuit they put in there. Couple that with my previous problem though, and ouch. The first time it happened I thought my phone had completely died for no reason at all. Had I not researched the problem I'd have ended up RMA'ing a phone that didn't need it. Funny how company reps didn't mention the recovery menu trick when I called about that "dead" phone, eh?

* Now on to Android itself. To put it bluntly, it's flaky as hell. Even Google's own apps crash frequently (maps, anyone?). This has happened on every Android device I've dealt with, Nexus or otherwise.
* Inconsistent notifications and poor handling of volume controls. When I press the volume button, what will it do? Change the music volume? The ringer/notifications? Both? I've never figured out a pattern to what it does. Sometimes it changes the volume of the foreground app when unlocked. Other times, the general media volume (even varies in the same app). Sometimes the notifications volume along with it, sometimes not. Other times, a background app will have somehow grabbed control of the volume buttons and they won't even control the volume (more on that when I talk about apps). Really? In 2014 we can't figure out how to make a damn volume button work consistently? At least iOS does that and you can even set whether the buttons will affect notifications or not on that platform. Android? Think again. Too many things fighting for control, even with few things installed.
* Do not disturb. Such a simple concept... yet one completely missing from stock Android. Seriously. Motorola has their version of it called Assist and it works okay, most of the time. on iOS though, I must say, dnd works 100% of the time when scheduled (one of the few things that has worked properly since day one of its introduction). There are varying versions of it across Android device manufacturers and custom roms, and don't even get me started on the so-called do not disturb apps in the Play store. It's a clusterfuck.
* Custom roms. That's everyone's response is use a custom rom. Screw that. I bought a phone to work for me. I do not work for it. If we feel that custom roms are needed, something has already gone horribly wrong with the core. It's as simple as that, and I don't have the time for that crap. A phone needs to be reliable.
* Last but not least, the apps. Oh, the apps. Don't get me wrong, there are some real gems out there on Android. Apps like Smart Audiobook Player simply don't exist for iOS, nor does Firefox Mobile (best damn mobile browser I've ever used). But most of them are pure crap, and whenever there's a choice between Android or iOS versions of the same app, the iOS version typically is more stable and has more features. And the adware... I need to vomit just thinking about it. I can hardly find one app that doesn't ship with ad crapware, and a lot of them have no option to pay to remove it. Add to that, they push ads to the notification center. What the flying fuck? In the app is bad enough, but outside of it too? Any app which does that gets an instant removal from my device, no exceptions. Sadly, it's getting to be more and more common lately in the Play store. Half the time I can't even find an app I want (still looking for a good sleep tracking alarm clock that doesn't fucking silence my alarms when the ringer is turned off). High quality audio recording? No apps for that (oh there are plenty of recording apps, but they don't even come close to high quality).
* No useful integration with anything other than Bluetooth. No Airplay, which Chromecast doesn't even come close to replacing. NO charging docks that double as speakers (and no, I do not count the ones that send phone audio over Bluetooth and have a USB port).
When it all comes down to it, and when you add the new features coming in iOS 8 for Mac users (which I am), I'm seeing more cons than pros with the switch. The customization and power is nice, but it feels hollow when I take into account the other issues, and I'm not sure it's worth the hassle it has become.

Reply Score: 5

Just did the opposite
by stardogchamp on Sat 14th Jun 2014 11:28 UTC
stardogchamp
Member since:
2009-10-18

I just switched back to my iPhone 5 yesterday, after using a Sony Xperia Z1 Compact for about 3 months. I will not settle for anything but a Google maintained phone, should I ever switch back.

My Sony randomly crashes, hangs, reboots, gets stuck on the lock screen (and you can't remove the battery or force it to reboot, you just have to wait for 10 minutes until it decides to either do that or start working again). Additionally, I can't remove some of the crappy Sony apps that I neither want nor need, and updates are slow. There are no stable custom roms for the Z1 Compact at this point (at least that I know of).

There's a lot of things i actually like about Android, but honestly, Samsung's phone just make me want to rip my eyes out and while Sony's phones are attractive, their software simply sucks. And a lot of the Android phones I actually want are not available in Switzerland, or only when they've been on the market elsewhere for about 6 months.

Battery life was AWESOME though, 2.5 days usually until I had to recharge. Never got that from a smartphone before. But all in all: Not happy.

Reply Score: 2

It is like I said..
by bassbeast on Sat 14th Jun 2014 13:13 UTC
bassbeast
Member since:
2007-11-11

There is a big opening for somebody to come out with a mobile OS that takes the world by storm because most folks don't really LIKE their smartphone, they TOLERATE it.

I bet my last buck that everybody here can name several things they do NOT like about their smartphones, that includes myself. I have an Android phone and I hate how it has "senior moments" where it will just get jerky for a second or two, I think its task management isn't good, the permissions are watered down and honestly too vague, there are several areas where it could be a LOT better.

So I will keep trying new phones hoping to find a phone OS that works as well as a modern desktop...in fact smartphones in 2014 remind me of desktops circa 1993, they're buggy,unpredictable, and just feel primitive compared to what we've had on the desktop. Talking to folks there are plenty that would be happy to switch, just offer something truly better than the other guys and we'll happily jump on board.

Reply Score: 2

RE: It is like I said..
by Lennie on Sat 14th Jun 2014 18:46 UTC in reply to "It is like I said.."
Lennie Member since:
2007-09-22

most folks don't really LIKE their smartphone, they TOLERATE it.


Yeah, it's true, but when people are given an option, they don't always take it.

For example I hate touchscreen, I would rather have a hardware keyboard.

But it turns out, manufacturers created them, but nobody bought them. They flopped. Now to be honest, I think it might have been a timing issue.

The problem is, even if you make great products for a good price it doesn't mean your sales will be great.

Reply Score: 3

RE[2]: It is like I said..
by darknexus on Sat 14th Jun 2014 20:55 UTC in reply to "RE: It is like I said.."
darknexus Member since:
2008-07-15

For example I hate touchscreen, I would rather have a hardware keyboard.

With you, all the way. I still miss my Nokia E72 for that reason.

Reply Score: 3

RE[2]: It is like I said..
by sb56637 on Sun 15th Jun 2014 05:11 UTC in reply to "RE: It is like I said.."
sb56637 Member since:
2006-05-11

"most folks don't really LIKE their smartphone, they TOLERATE it.


For example I hate touchscreen, I would rather have a hardware keyboard.
"

Another big +1 to both of these points. Many things drive me crazy about my Galaxy S3 with Cyanogenmod.

And yes, please, SOMEBODY please design another QWERTY Android phone. I would buy it in a heartbeat, and I know I'm not the only one.

Reply Score: 2

RE[3]: It is like I said..
by Morgan on Sun 15th Jun 2014 20:34 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: It is like I said.."
Morgan Member since:
2005-06-29

And yes, please, SOMEBODY please design another QWERTY Android phone. I would buy it in a heartbeat, and I know I'm not the only one.


Unfortunately people like us who are more productive on real keyboards are about to be completely out of luck. I don't think there are plans for another qwerty slider from any of the major Android phone makers, going forward.

I still prefer my HTC 8XT to the Motorola Photon Q I had been using, but I sorely miss the Q's excellent keyboard. It's definitely the best mobile keyboard I've ever used.

Reply Score: 3

RE: It is like I said..
by caudex on Mon 16th Jun 2014 05:30 UTC in reply to "It is like I said.."
caudex Member since:
2008-07-05

Most people maybe, but I love my BlackBerry Z10. The only downside is that it lacks native Skype and Viber applications (and I prefer not having to use Android applications - simply because they're always way worse than their iOS/BlackBerry 10 equivalents, and they also look out of place).

Reply Score: 1

If you don't like...
by James_Smith on Sun 15th Jun 2014 22:05 UTC
James_Smith
Member since:
2014-06-15

A feature, don't use it. I am an Android user and there are features I find unreliable or annoying. Instead of whining about it, I don't use them. How difficult is that?

Reply Score: 0

Milo_Hoffman
Member since:
2005-07-06

Been there.... switched to Android.

Had mostly ZERO problems with the operating system, other than maybe the OS felt a "tiny" bit more sluggish and less smooth than iOS, but it was hardly noticeable. Other than that the OS was fine.


What took me back to iOS was the apps. The APP QUALITY is 100000x poorer on Android. For the same class of app doing the same function, the iOS Apps are much much better quality. This is often even true of apps when the same company makes both apps on both platforms.

The difference in app quality, and usability was night and day better on iOS.

What is interesting is I expected the opposite with the developers having more 'freedom' to do what they wanted on Android.

Reply Score: 2

jailbrek your iPhone, iPad or iPod
by roki56 on Tue 17th Jun 2014 21:54 UTC
roki56
Member since:
2014-06-17

How to jailbrek your iPhone, iPad or iPod on easiest way? We want to help you avoid the limitation of IOS systems, therefore offer this tool to be able to jailbreak your Apple device. http://bypassicloudactivationlockios.blogspot.com/2014/05/jailbreak...

Reply Score: 1