Linked by Thom Holwerda on Tue 5th Aug 2014 18:55 UTC, submitted by Sam
PDAs, Cellphones, Wireless

Samsung in China:

Xiaomi, a smartphone maker based in China, sold more devices in its home market during the second quarter than Samsung, the world's No. 1 supplier of devices. Samsung owned the Chinese smartphone market for more than two years, but data from Canalys says its reign has come to an end.

Samsung in India:

Indian budget smartphone maker Micromax has ousted Samsung Electronics Co Ltd as the leading brand in all types of mobile phones in the April-June quarter, grabbing a 16.6 percent market share, a recent research report showed.

Great news for consumers and the market in general. This will drive prices down, foster competition, and increase choice. We all win.

Now, if only Europe had its own smartphone maker. And what about South-America?

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themwagency
Member since:
2013-03-06

Xiaomi makes Samsung look like original thinkers.

Behold the revolutionary power of iPhone: The only smartphones that sell well are Apple iPhones and fake Apple iPhones.


“[Steve] Jobs will die someday, so there are still opportunities for us. The meaning of our existence is just waiting for him to kick the bucket.” – Xiaomi CEO Lei Jun, August 30, 2011

On a side note, Xiaomi employs Hugo Barra the former vice president of Google's Android

Reply Score: 0

Bill Shooter of Bul Member since:
2006-07-14

You're not wrong, but I don't understand your point.

I think you're either not trying to make a point and just stating that you don't like xiaomi because of those facts, or you've only made half a point. The other half would be something like: " Due to the level of copying, I don't think Xiaomi can compete in US or European markets without being sued, as Samsung was ".

Reply Score: 3

calden Member since:
2012-02-02

You're not wrong, but I don't understand your point.

I think you're either not trying to make a point and just stating that you don't like xiaomi because of those facts, or you've only made half a point. The other half would be something like: " Due to the level of copying, I don't think Xiaomi can compete in US or European markets without being sued, as Samsung was ".


Xiaomi has been selling their phones and tablets in Europe for a while now. They just stay out of Germany where Apple seems to have a strong hold over the government.

https://www.digitec.ch/de/Search?q=Xiaomi

Edited 2014-08-06 08:00 UTC

Reply Score: 2

Hardly room for innovation
by leos on Tue 5th Aug 2014 19:28 UTC
leos
Member since:
2005-09-21

Just like the laptop market its a race to the bottom with razor thin margins. What advantage does a Samsung device have over a Huawei or anyone else? It's all android, and so far Samsung's layers of crapware aren't exactly a value add.
Apple is long past the phase of dominance from moving first, but they will continue to do well because they have a unique product. Without that you have to compete on price

Reply Score: 5

RE: Hardly room for innovation
by bnolsen on Tue 5th Aug 2014 19:35 UTC in reply to "Hardly room for innovation "
bnolsen Member since:
2006-01-06

In a way it kind of shows that google was wise in not going after the hardware side.

It does seem that innovation in the smartphone market is slowing and that traditional big markets are getting to a saturation point.

Of course none of this stops google from getting their data mining, service and advertising moneys.

Reply Score: 3

Tony Swash Member since:
2009-08-22

In a way it kind of shows that google was wise in not going after the hardware side.


Google makes nothing from the growing number of Android devices that come from outside the Open Handset Alliance and which don't bundle it's service stack. Google is finding it very difficult to propagate it's services (and therefore it's revenue base) in China. That may be a significant problem going forward.

Google is dependent on OEMs to propagating it's services and at the same time it's Android ecosystem model (which more or less diverts all service related income to Google) squeezes OEMs revenue earning abilities and creates a reason to ditch Google's services if that can be done without endangering the ability to sell devices. At the moment the main place where it is possible to ditch Google services is China, unfortunately for Google it's precisely in China that a great deal of the future growth in mobile devices will occur.

http://thenextweb.com/google/2014/08/05/google-under-threat-as-fork...

It does seem that innovation in the smartphone market is slowing


Only if you think about innovation in a narrow hardware only way. Modern devices are a blend of hardware, services and ecosystem. Innovation can occur in all those areas and in the relationship between them.

Edited 2014-08-05 22:45 UTC

Reply Score: 2

RE[2]: Hardly room for innovation
by leos on Wed 6th Aug 2014 03:39 UTC in reply to "RE: Hardly room for innovation "
leos Member since:
2005-09-21

In a way it kind of shows that google was wise in not going after the hardware side.

It does seem that innovation in the smartphone market is slowing and that traditional big markets are getting to a saturation point.

Of course none of this stops google from getting their data mining, service and advertising moneys.


The innovation I can't wait for is long battery life. I was really hoping that would come in the next generation of smartphones but it seems they are more interested in thin than a phone that lasts a few days on a charge instead of just one.

Reply Score: 6

RE: Hardly room for innovation
by WorknMan on Tue 5th Aug 2014 22:03 UTC in reply to "Hardly room for innovation "
WorknMan Member since:
2005-11-13

What advantage does a Samsung device have over a Huawei or anyone else?


In regard to the US, I can walk into just about any store that sells cell phones and actually put my hands on a Samsung phone, which to me is HUGE. I want to know what a phone feels like in my hand before purchasing, as in does it fit comfortably?

At this point, I'm not sure if there's any place local to try out one of these 'knock-off' phones that can compete with the S5 spec-wise. I'm also not sure if I'd be able to find any decent accessories for them either. From what I can see, any of these phones, like the OnePlus One that really are decent, are also too damn big. People in China and India must have huge, Saskwatch hands or something.

Reply Score: 4

unclefester Member since:
2007-01-13

People in China buy big phones for the same reason they buy big cars. It's a conspicuous display of wealth.

Reply Score: 5

xiaomi missing stuffs
by bnolsen on Tue 5th Aug 2014 19:31 UTC
bnolsen
Member since:
2006-01-06

Specs on the xiaomis look impressive...except for a couple of (to me) important features.

Sad the battery isn't user replaceable. Sad no microsd slot.

It's like they want you to buy a new phone after 18 months.

Reply Score: 6

v Comment by Troels
by Troels on Tue 5th Aug 2014 19:57 UTC
RE: Comment by Troels
by zima on Thu 7th Aug 2014 03:18 UTC in reply to "Comment by Troels"
zima Member since:
2005-07-06

can anyone actually mention any really good software being designed and developed in asia? I hope the answer is a big yes, but i am currently blank.

What, you forgot about all great Japanese games?... And arguably a lot of embedded software in electronics - it's really good if it's invisible.

Also, of the software I'm familiar with, Foxit is Chinese. And LXDE originated in Taiwan. Plus, I suspect Wikipedia has categories "software developed in China/India/..." and so on, but I'm too lazy to check. ;)

Reply Score: 4

RE: Comment by Troels
by zima on Tue 12th Aug 2014 23:57 UTC in reply to "Comment by Troels"
zima Member since:
2005-07-06

PS. Small follow-up: I did a quick search in free time, and it seems there are no "software developed in China/India/..." categories on Wikipedia after all... ;)

But there are http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Video_games_by_country ...where Japan of course dwarfs almost everybody else (and I suspect that number is still under-reported, on EN Wiki); also South Korea has quite respectable number (how could I forget about GunBound?! ;) ); and I suspect China is simply vastly under-reported (judging from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Online_gaming_in_China article; which also links to few notable games in its introduction and further down)


Some other links that showed up:

Not "software" but: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Software_companies_by_country

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Software_industry_in_China & http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/China_Software_Industry_Association with links to some respectable, I guess, Chinese software companies and software parks

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dalian_Software_Park

While American and European companies typically have gone to Bangalore and other cities in India because of the English language capability, the Japanese companies have gone to Dalian and other cities in China due to the Japanese language capability.


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electronics_industry_in_China
Approved software companies have reached 11,660, increasing by over 1,000 per annum. There are roughly 1 million employees working in China’s software industry. China’s software exports have reached US$35.9 billion in 2005, though this was short of the US$50 billion export goal set forth in the Tenth 5-Year Plan, which ended in 2005.


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Template:IT_consulting_and_outsourcing...

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/TRON_project - one of most used operating systems

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Line_(application) one of the biggest IM networks

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hangame large South Korean online gaming portal

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/TOMOYO_Linux japanese ...and generally, you could browse sourceforge.jp top projects ;)

Now that I think about it, you could ask on slashdot.jp ;P

Oh, and Alibaba.com is not exactly software, but certainly ~revolutionary ;p

Edited 2014-08-13 00:14 UTC

Reply Score: 2

South-America´s way
by UglyKidBill on Tue 5th Aug 2014 20:24 UTC
UglyKidBill
Member since:
2005-07-27

Well... if South-America had it own smartphone maker...

Imports of "foreing" products would be taxed to foster the local manufacturer, prices would fold 3 times and quality drop to a 1/4, so... thanks, but no thanks ;)

Edited 2014-08-05 20:25 UTC

Reply Score: 2

RE: South-Americaôs way
by dmrio on Tue 5th Aug 2014 21:40 UTC in reply to "South-America´s way"
dmrio Member since:
2005-08-26

We already have overtaxed smartphones here in South America, we just do not have local builders. Foxconn and the likes just assemble imported (overtaxed?) parts. Even Positivo (brazilian local builder) imports smartphones to sell here.

Reply Score: 3

RE: South-Americaôs way
by Hiev on Tue 5th Aug 2014 22:58 UTC in reply to "South-America´s way"
Hiev Member since:
2005-09-27

I don't know about south-america, but Mexico has its own smartphone maker.

http://www.lanixmobile.com/

Reply Score: 3

RE: South-Americaôs way
by protomank on Thu 7th Aug 2014 13:13 UTC in reply to "South-America´s way"
protomank Member since:
2006-08-03

Also, we are miles away from having a processors manufacture. The only thing CEITEC (a government company founded to develop microprocessors) was able to do until now is a cow tracking earring. So basically, ALL important components like screen, co-processors, GPU, CPU have to be imported, we only have technology for creating the boards and shells.

So there is little sense in trying to push for a "national industry", throught high importing taxes, while we don't have technology. But still, governments do exactly that! ;)

Reply Score: 2

About Europe...
by ebasconp on Tue 5th Aug 2014 20:44 UTC
ebasconp
Member since:
2006-05-09

You all have Jolla and Geeksphone (as far as I know).

In South America things are sadder; maybe Brazil can surprise us with some development in house, but I am just speculating right here.

Reply Score: 2

Comment by Lorin
by Lorin on Tue 5th Aug 2014 22:24 UTC
Lorin
Member since:
2010-04-06

You are talking about countries that are 99% poor, these changes are those people who can't afford a Samsung flagship mobile, those who can afford them will continue to buy them. I work in China and see nothing but Samsung with a handful of iPhones

Reply Score: 3

Smartphone makers in the Philippines
by allanregistos on Wed 6th Aug 2014 00:01 UTC
allanregistos
Member since:
2011-02-10

Now, if only Europe had its own smartphone maker. And what about South-America?

I will hardly believe that. Even here in my country there are at least two smartphone makers(not counting My|Phone), but their market is domestic only as far as I know.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_mobile_phone_makers_by_country...

Reply Score: 1

MIUI
by sb56637 on Wed 6th Aug 2014 00:45 UTC
sb56637
Member since:
2006-05-11

I wonder if the success of Xiaomi is owing in part to the excellent MIUI, which in my opinion is a better Android than Android. I run MIUI on my Galaxy S3, and it's so much better than the stock OS that it's not even funny.

Reply Score: 4

RE: MIUI
by calden on Wed 6th Aug 2014 08:06 UTC in reply to "MIUI"
calden Member since:
2012-02-02

I wonder if the success of Xiaomi is owing in part to the excellent MIUI, which in my opinion is a better Android than Android. I run MIUI on my Galaxy S3, and it's so much better than the stock OS that it's not even funny.


What's even funnier I find it a better then iOS, even though it's a blatant UI copycat. It pisses me off to no end that Apple treats it's users like their morons.

Reply Score: 2

stabbyjones
Member since:
2008-04-15

unfortunately for europe, it was nokia.

Reply Score: 6

dvhh Member since:
2006-03-20

well there is also alcatel (lol)

Reply Score: 3

spiderman Member since:
2008-10-23

There are dozens and dozens of smartphones manufacturers in Europe and latin America. Wiko is kind of successful in my country (France) :
http://fr.wikomobile.com/
You will never hear of local brands in Europe or Latin America because the local brands sell well only in their home country or even smaller region. Of course when that region is India or China it is a whole different story. France has 65 million people. Both India and China have more than 1 billion people. Nobody cares about the french market. Look Jolla. European brand, doesn't even care about its own market, they sell their phone in China. It's all about Asia, because that's where most people live.

Reply Score: 4

_QJ_ Member since:
2009-03-12

Yes and I am very happy with my 3 years "old" Wiko smart-phone. It has all, double sims, cheap and solid.

It is an every day good surprise to me.

The next try may be a OneTouch (ex-Alcatel Team).

Ho and I am not French.

Do you remember the good'ol' One Touch Easy ?
Heavy as a cabin, still have one, still working ! 8-)

Reply Score: 2