Linked by Thom Holwerda on Sat 17th Jan 2015 20:18 UTC
Linux

I'm going to describe steps needed to have the following system:

  • Dual-boot with Arch Linux / Mac OS X
  • Boot manager UEFI Gummiboot (simple, can handle several kernels easily)
  • Full disk encryption (Mac OS X and Arch Linux)
  • LVM support
  • Suspend to disk using a swapfile
  • Settings for a great battery life (~09h30)

I keep the Mac OS X partition, to be able to update the firmware later.

Incredibly detailed 'blog post' (I would call it a website) on how to get, well, Arch Linux running on the MacBook Pro Retina 2014. I know Arch is quite popular among OSNews readers, so I figured this would be of interest to some of you. The article is a work-in-progress, so more information is sure to follow.

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Ok
by krakal on Sat 17th Jan 2015 21:16 UTC
krakal
Member since:
2015-01-03

So I actually have an arch macbook pro, and it "kind of works".

The takeaway from my experiment is that Apple is 100% right in that controlling both the hardware and the software is necessary to maximize user experience.

A macbook on linux < macbook with os x.

Reply Score: 2

RE: Ok
by JAlexoid on Sat 17th Jan 2015 22:50 UTC in reply to "Ok"
JAlexoid Member since:
2009-05-19

That is why I shy away from MacBooks. OSX is too far away from my target platform. Too bad that ThinkPad T430s has a bad battery ;)

Reply Score: 5

RE: Ok
by quackalist on Sun 18th Jan 2015 21:01 UTC in reply to "Ok"
quackalist Member since:
2007-08-27

Tosh, I get crap like it's best not to update a Mac to a newer OSX version cause of an extreme version of this argument by a Mac user. If true, it'd be saying OSX was a crap OS or Apple doesn't give a monkeys about its users......the later would seem a fair point, come to think of it.

Reply Score: 2

Or just buy a cheap Wintel laptop
by cmost on Sun 18th Jan 2015 15:59 UTC
cmost
Member since:
2006-07-16

I understand the "coolness" factor when it comes to Apple hardware and its fans. I cannot, however; see the logic in taking the trouble to shoehorn Linux onto a highly proprietary (and comparatively expensive) Apple laptop when one can simply purchase a more powerful Wintel notebook for less than half the price of a Macbook and Linux will more than likely "just work" out of the box. But, maybe I'm just too practical.

Reply Score: 5

torp Member since:
2010-08-10

Well the guy is still getting 9 h 30 min battery life out of his laptop even with Linux. Show me the "more powerful Wintel laptop" that does that.
Models requiring a wheeled cart to move them around, or sounding like a vacuum cleaner, don't qualify.

Reply Score: 0

torp Member since:
2010-08-10

That looks nice. However the battery life claims have a lot of disclaimers and include "with second battery".
I guess if you'd rather have the option of running Windows and Linux instead of OS X and Linux, it could be worth buying.

Reply Score: 1

torp Member since:
2010-08-10

That looks nice. However the battery life claims have a lot of disclaimers and include "with second battery".
I guess if you'd rather have the option of running Windows and Linux instead of OS X and Linux, it could be worth buying.

Although this user review of the hi res model says 6 hours: http://www.amazon.com/Fujitsu-Spfc-U904-001-Lifebook-Ultrabook-Wind...
At a quick google it also has a non high res screen option. Maybe the 24 hours claim is with the normal screen and extra battery? I wasn't able to find a configurator that would allow me to spec something comparable to a rMBP.

Reply Score: 1

quackalist Member since:
2007-08-27

Well you might actually like Apple hardware and OSX but still want to run other OS's. It's been known, do it myself with Win/Linux boxen though I've not done so with my Mac Air, thinking of it though as I'm getting fed up with how buggy OSX can be

Reply Score: 2