Linked by Thom Holwerda on Fri 22nd May 2015 19:17 UTC
Mac OS X

For the first time in several years, Apple is changing up its annual iOS and OS X upgrade cycle by limiting new feature additions in favor of a "big focus on quality," according to multiple sources familiar with the company's operating system development plans. We first reported in February that iOS 9, codenamed "Monarch," would heavily feature under-the-hood optimizations, and we've now learned that Apple is taking the same approach with OS X 10.11, codenamed "Gala." Sources have revealed additional new details on how Apple will optimize the new operating systems for improved stability and performance, add several new security features, and make important changes to its Swift programming tools for developers.

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Comment by Kroc
by Kroc on Fri 22nd May 2015 20:28 UTC
Kroc
Member since:
2005-11-10

Sources within Apple are particularly enthusiastic about a new security system called Rootless, which is being described internally as a “huge,” kernel-level feature for both OS X and iOS. To prevent malware, increase the safety of extensions, and preserve the security of sensitive data, Rootless will prevent even administrative-level users from being able to access certain protected files on Apple devices.


This is the day computing died.

Reply Score: 3

RE: Comment by Kroc
by The123king on Fri 22nd May 2015 21:03 UTC in reply to "Comment by Kroc"
The123king Member since:
2009-05-28

They'll probably add a way of disabling or at least limiting it. Otherwise they'll lose a good chunk of market share.

You'll find they'll charge you £79 and require shipping it back to them in order to do it though. After all, that's the most "secure" way...

Reply Score: 2

RE: Comment by Kroc
by darknexus on Fri 22nd May 2015 21:25 UTC in reply to "Comment by Kroc"
darknexus Member since:
2008-07-15

Yeah, malware my ass. Most malware these days wants your data, not your computer and somehow I don't think even Apple are dumb enough that they'd prevent a program from reading your home directory where your data is stored. Safety? More like control. I just hope to hell we have a way to turn it off.

Reply Score: 3

RE: Comment by Kroc
by galvanash on Fri 22nd May 2015 21:44 UTC in reply to "Comment by Kroc"
galvanash Member since:
2006-01-25

This is the day computing died.


I'll withhold final judgement until I see exactly what this entails... It sure sounds bad though.

Reply Score: 3

RE: Comment by Kroc
by gan17 on Sat 23rd May 2015 17:52 UTC in reply to "Comment by Kroc"
gan17 Member since:
2008-06-03

This is the day computing died.

Doesn't seem much different from current iOS, from a user perspective at least. Probably additional pain for developers and jailbreakers.

Does sound quite nasty for OS X though.

Edited 2015-05-23 17:52 UTC

Reply Score: 2

Oh how nice
by The123king on Fri 22nd May 2015 20:55 UTC
The123king
Member since:
2009-05-28

We first reported in February that iOS 9, codenamed "Monarch,"...


They've decided to name iOS versions after butterflies.

How nice.

Reply Score: 3

RE: Oh how nice
by Nico57 on Fri 22nd May 2015 23:10 UTC in reply to "Oh how nice"
Nico57 Member since:
2006-12-18

...with OS X 10.11, codenamed "Gala."


And they've decided to name OS X versions after actual apples. :-)

Reply Score: 4

RE[2]: Oh how nice
by darknexus on Fri 22nd May 2015 23:44 UTC in reply to "RE: Oh how nice"
darknexus Member since:
2008-07-15

And they've decided to name OS X versions after actual apples. :-)

Yeah. I want OS X Granny Smith. Somehow I bet that's unlikely though.

Reply Score: 2

RE: Oh how nice
by Drumhellar on Fri 22nd May 2015 23:45 UTC in reply to "Oh how nice"
Drumhellar Member since:
2005-07-12

Well, Monarch Beach is a beach in California (Just like Mavericks)

Not sure what Gala refers to, though.

Reply Score: 2

RE[2]: Oh how nice
by Drumhellar on Sat 23rd May 2015 01:46 UTC in reply to "RE: Oh how nice"
Drumhellar Member since:
2005-07-12

Gala and Monarchs are both apples, actually.

This kinda works.

Reply Score: 2

Comment by ryak
by ryak on Fri 22nd May 2015 21:34 UTC
ryak
Member since:
2015-04-20

Awesome, Yosemite does everything I need, but a few optimization sounds fine by me.

Reply Score: 1

MacOS 9...
by jburnett on Fri 22nd May 2015 22:17 UTC
jburnett
Member since:
2012-03-29

When I read the headline I thought it said MacOS 9, not iOS 9. I thought this was going to be a comparison of Apple's recent focus on quality compared with a similar focus all those years ago when OS9 came out.

Reply Score: 1

RE: MacOS 9...
by BallmerKnowsBest on Mon 25th May 2015 19:53 UTC in reply to "MacOS 9..."
BallmerKnowsBest Member since:
2008-06-02

When I read the headline I thought it said MacOS 9, not iOS 9. I thought this was going to be a comparison of Apple's recent focus on quality compared with a similar focus all those years ago when OS9 came out.


Or maybe it means that next step in iOS's evolution is that it will start incorporating some of the iconic features of Apple's "classic" operating systems. Finally, today's generation will be feel the excitement of Errors of an Unknown Type occurring. Or manually managing virtual memory, for each individual app. Or experience the classic game known as "Rebooting with extensions disabled" AKA "Whack-a-Extension" (hey, that would probably be more exciting than most actual mobile games).

Or the heart-pounding excitement of having your eardrums nearly blown-out, because you were unlucky enough to have headphones connected when the device crashed - and some brain donor at Apple thought it would be "cute" to use a loud car crash sound effect as an error alert. Or maybe iOS 9 will introduce a largely-modal UI that's incapable of all but the most basic, kinda-sorta-but-not-really multitasking... oh wait, iOS already has that feature. Nevermind.

Reply Score: 2

rootless
by Nex6 on Sat 23rd May 2015 03:22 UTC
Nex6
Member since:
2005-07-06

MS with windows 10, is doing thing like this. trying to have core stuff more locked down so the OS can protect it self more.

I will hold judgement until i see how it actually works. but even Linux with SElinux enabled locks down root account.

whats happening is Windows, Linux, and OSX/BSDs are doing some of the stuff from EAL 5 and other high secure models.

Reply Score: 3

Wait, what?
by lopezio on Sun 24th May 2015 13:51 UTC
lopezio
Member since:
2015-05-24

After basing its OS on open source software with OSX, Apple is slowly but steadily banning open source software from the Mac (eg. yosemite: no unsigned kernel extensions, "allow any software" choice auto-resetting itself, etc...).

I am a very long time mac and osx user, and I really hate to see the day coming where I'll have to leave for good (and choose the Linux/BSD flavor suiting most of my needs). I love(d) this platform as a sysadmin and as a developer, and really felt home so far on osx. It will be a painful and uneasy transition for me to leave it, as a longtime user I have my toolbox here. But with these news on the horizon, at the very least I'll wait until after WWDC before I buy a new Mac Book Pro (I almost clicked on "buy" after the 15" were updated lately).

And wait a second, how do You expect this rootless "feature" to be "disableable"? I mean, a way to disable it would defeat its purpose, wouldn't it...

Maybe it's time to realize that Apple does not care at all for professional users - unless they're coding for them... ;)

But as always, as biased and Apple-brainwashed as I am, I'll wait and see. But even for me, there's a limit. And when I leave, I promise, I'll take at least as many people with me over time, as those that I have brought to the platform. And that's many, many users.

Reply Score: 1

RE: Wait, what?
by Nex6 on Mon 25th May 2015 04:22 UTC in reply to "Wait, what?"
Nex6 Member since:
2005-07-06

All of the modern OS's are taking things from the higher security models. this, is just one of them... we should see how it plays out.

Reply Score: 2