Linked by David Adams on Thu 18th Jun 2015 16:26 UTC
Apple

I bought an Apple Watch, and I've been wearing it for about two weeks. I'm a notorious mobile computing fanatic and early adopter. How does it hold up to real-world use? How does it compare to the hype?

Let's get this out of the way: I've been waiting for an Apple Watch for a long time. While a lot of people were quick to dismiss the whole idea, I've been on board with the idea of a wrist-mounted companion to a smartphone since I first started using a smartphone. I never bought a Pebble or any of the other first generation smart watches, largely because I've been around the block long enough to know that it's hard to be an early adopter, but partially because I wanted to wait and see what Apple would come up with.

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Yes
by sacc on Thu 18th Jun 2015 17:33 UTC
sacc
Member since:
2015-06-17

Very well summed up, and I agree. Clearly not perfect, but one month in, I'm still not anywhere near putting my Apple Watch in the drawer (where the moto lives)

Reply Score: 1

Saw one in the US
by shotsman on Thu 18th Jun 2015 17:42 UTC
shotsman
Member since:
2005-07-22

Disappointed about the apps not being removable esp the stocks. I only ever see them by accident on my company iPhone. I am NOT repeat NOT interested in Stock prices. I'd fully expect that most women with a watch wouldn't be interested either.

Apple needs to make it totally customisable. Then it will become more individual, tailoerd to the user.

Not going to get one. None of the bands I tried would fit my elephant trunk of a wrist. But that is rather moot anyway because I haven't worn a watch for 40years.

However, if Apple have sold around 5M of the things already then they will have re-defined the market in one go.

for a 1st gen device? pretty good 6/10.

Reply Score: 3

v RE: Saw one in the US
by sacc on Thu 18th Jun 2015 18:06 UTC in reply to "Saw one in the US"
RE[2]: Saw one in the US
by David on Thu 18th Jun 2015 18:12 UTC in reply to "RE: Saw one in the US"
David Member since:
1997-10-01

I agree with the general sentiment of OP's statement. Even for people who (like me) are generally interested in the stock market, very few of us actually want to clutter up our watch with stock quotes. And ironically, for the niche that does want stock quotes, the stock app isn't suitable because it have any market alerts or integration with trading platforms. So the stock app is basically useful for no one.

Reply Score: 3

v RE[3]: Saw one in the US
by sacc on Thu 18th Jun 2015 18:15 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Saw one in the US"
RE[4]: Saw one in the US
by Alfman on Thu 18th Jun 2015 20:43 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: Saw one in the US"
Alfman Member since:
2011-01-28

A smart watch to tell me how much I'm worth? Honestly, one glance at my used car, my NTSC TV, or my flip phone tells me that already. If I really wanted something on my wrist to remind me too, I'd get a $25 Casio.

Reply Score: 4

RE[5]: Saw one in the US
by kwan_e on Thu 18th Jun 2015 23:55 UTC in reply to "RE[4]: Saw one in the US"
kwan_e Member since:
2007-02-18

A smart watch to tell me how much I'm worth? Honestly, one glance at my used car, my NTSC TV, or my flip phone tells me that already. If I really wanted something on my wrist to remind me too, I'd get a $25 Casio.


Oh, you're worth MUCH LESS than that. ;) Joking aside, like stock markets, people are over-valued by their assets.

But I like that way of putting it - a watch to tell you how much you're worth.

Reply Score: 3

Notifications
by Lennie on Fri 19th Jun 2015 00:01 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Saw one in the US"
Lennie Member since:
2007-09-22

Now I have to ask:

My impression always was, I see some of that in the article again, the people that really want a smart watch have a notification problem. They have to many of them and they just can't seem ignore them.

It looks like some kind of an addiction or an anxiety of missing out on something important.

To me it made a lot more sense to have that phone with the e-ink on the back and that just have some counters with all the notifications which I don't want to be notified about (app/type X: 3, app/type Y: 4, new messages from SomePerson: 6).

So to me it seems the smartwatch is solving the wrong problem.

What would you say to that ?

Edited 2015-06-19 00:03 UTC

Reply Score: 3

RE: Notifications
by darknexus on Fri 19th Jun 2015 14:05 UTC in reply to "Notifications"
darknexus Member since:
2008-07-15

Now I have to ask:

My impression always was, I see some of that in the article again, the people that really want a smart watch have a notification problem. They have to many of them and they just can't seem ignore them.

It looks like some kind of an addiction or an anxiety of missing out on something important.

This. You hit the nail on the head imho. I don't get it myself. When I get a notification, unless I'm expecting something, I wait until I'm somewhere I can easily deal with it. The nearest street corner or bus shelter is always a good place just to see what it might be, and if I'm not expecting anything I don't even check that quickly. No one's going to die if I don't respond to their text right that instant, or return their call in two minutes.

Reply Score: 2

RE: Notifications
by gan17 on Fri 19th Jun 2015 16:51 UTC in reply to "Notifications"
gan17 Member since:
2008-06-03

Now I have to ask:

My impression always was, I see some of that in the article again, the people that really want a smart watch have a notification problem.


Therein lies my rub with a lot of Apple Watch reviews. They always have a title or paragraph header with words like "How the Apple Watch liberated me from my iPhone".

I just don't get it. You spend money on the iPhone, and then you spend more money on the Watch in order to use your iPhone less?

I'm not dissing the Apple Watch per se - not tried one so I won't judge. I just don't get many of the articles promoting them.

Reply Score: 4

RE[2]: Saw one in the US
by Carewolf on Thu 18th Jun 2015 19:30 UTC in reply to "RE: Saw one in the US"
Carewolf Member since:
2005-09-08

"Disappointed about the apps not being removable esp the stocks. I only ever see them by accident on my company iPhone. I am NOT repeat NOT interested in Stock prices. I'd fully expect that most women with a watch wouldn't be interested either.


Considering 25% of the western population own public stock, and Apple users clearly have money and are probably even stocked up, "most" is a bit harsh.
"

Doubt it. Only 1%'ers are not in debt.

Reply Score: 7

RE[3]: Saw one in the US
by shotsman on Fri 19th Jun 2015 05:46 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Saw one in the US"
shotsman Member since:
2005-07-22

Ok, I'll take the bait.

I do own some shares (as we call them in the UK). Do I want to trade them on a whim of a notification that might appear on my wrist? Not a chance.
Unless you are a trader/day trader share dealing is not something you do every day. So why does the normal person need to know (instantly) that the FT250 has gone up by 0.01% when 15mins ago it was flat? They don't.
Their life is is not going to end because their portfolio has gove down by $10 in the last hour. If you are in that state then may I humbly suggest that you seek professional medial advice.

On average I look at my investments once a month. I have other things in my life that take priority. But that it just me, a sad sack who owes no one any money and is looking forward to retiring soon.

Share apps and notifications might be useful to some people but once the ownership of device like the apple Watch gets out into the wider public the will be like me and not care about share price notifications. Now the weather... that is another story all together.

Reply Score: 5

RE[3]: Saw one in the US
by Bill Shooter of Bul on Fri 19th Jun 2015 17:29 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Saw one in the US"
Bill Shooter of Bul Member since:
2006-07-14

No, I'm pretty sure their tax returns show them as heavily in debt. They have very good tax lawyers.

Reply Score: 2

RE[3]: Saw one in the US
by zima on Sun 21st Jun 2015 23:55 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Saw one in the US"
zima Member since:
2005-07-06

Only 1%'ers are not in debt.

you're wrong (unless I suddenly became 1%, which I doubt very much)

Reply Score: 3

Two handed devices
by skandalfo on Thu 18th Jun 2015 18:16 UTC
skandalfo
Member since:
2010-04-07

My main pain point with smart watches is that they are basically two handed devices for any non basic interaction: you need the hand that wears it and the hand that fiddles with it.

Considering that most of the time I'd be interested to look at it I'm already carrying something else in one of my hands, just taking the one handed phone out of the pocket becomes a winner proposition.

Reply Score: 8

RE: Two handed devices
by jackeebleu on Sat 20th Jun 2015 19:32 UTC in reply to "Two handed devices"
jackeebleu Member since:
2006-01-26

Not when you are sing using Siri. Flip your wrist, screen wakes, "Hey Siri"... (state request), sit back, receive response. That other hand is busy being handy.

Reply Score: 1

Comment by ezraz
by ezraz on Thu 18th Jun 2015 18:57 UTC
ezraz
Member since:
2012-06-20

great write-up. you bring up some really interesting points and seem to be aware of the limitations and potential.

apple's 1.0 products are usually only about 50% of what they have planned.

i read, for instance, that in the initial spec there were many more health sensors leading to many health-related applications, but between accuracy problems with the wide variety of general public body/skin types and the various gov't approvals needed to be a healthcare device, they scaled it all back.

but apple has enough money to buy/hire anyone they need to get past these obstacles, if it's part of their strategy. Just usually not by v1.

Reply Score: 1

RE: Comment by ezraz
by leos on Sat 20th Jun 2015 03:18 UTC in reply to "Comment by ezraz"
leos Member since:
2005-09-21

Exactly this.

iPod 1 was pretty crappy and full of limitations
iPhone 1 was pretty crappy and full of limitations
iPad 1 was pretty crappy and full of limitations
MacBook air was pretty crappy and full of limitations.

None of those were really worth buying until the second or third gen unless you are a real early adopter, but they all were wildly successful in the end. Of all of them I have the most doubts about the Apple Watch, but I wouldn't discount it yet.

Reply Score: 2

Reminders
by kristoph on Fri 19th Jun 2015 02:01 UTC
kristoph
Member since:
2006-01-01

You apparently can't set reminders using the phone; there's no app for that.

"hey Siri, remind me to tell David Adams you can take reminders on an apple watch."

https://www.dropbox.com/s/puda9j8rmcupqu2/file%20jun%2018~*~...

Reply Score: 2

RE: Reminders
by David on Fri 19th Jun 2015 16:08 UTC in reply to "Reminders"
David Member since:
1997-10-01

I stand corrected. Thanks!

Reply Score: 1

Comment by PLan
by PLan on Fri 19th Jun 2015 05:50 UTC
PLan
Member since:
2006-01-10

I'm also a Casio G-Shock wearer and have a Galaxy Note. To be honest I'm not very interested in smartphones so the idea of extending functionality to my wrist just isn't appealing.

Maybe when a smart watch is launched that has a 10 year battery life like my G-Shock I'll take another look.

Reply Score: 2

For me the dumb watch
by Lobotomik on Fri 19th Jun 2015 07:54 UTC
Lobotomik
Member since:
2006-01-03

A smartphone is not a good substitute for a watch. Simply taking out the phone while you're sitting is not that simple. Then you have to turn it on just to see the time, and turn it off before you put it back in your pocket or it might do funny things. Then you have to put it back in your pocket: again, not simple if you are sitting.

So, I totally disagree that it beats a watch for looking up the time. But why a smart watch? Notifications? In my case, at least, they can wait. And if they cannot, I doubt that the simple interaction offered by a smartwatch would do. For important stuff, the ritual of pulling out the smartphone is worth it.

A dumbwatch gives good service, and good looks at many price points, from $15 to $15K and beyond. A smartwatch would give me only marginally more while looking substantially worse; definitely not enough to enslave me with the task of taking it off to recharge it every day, maybe twice, then put it back on.

I don't see anything in the iWatch that I don't see in Google Wear, except the extra fidelity (or is it gullibility?) brang by Apple users. And I HATE to be patronized with the assumption that if I am an Apple user I must give a damn about stock prices.

Edited 2015-06-19 07:58 UTC

Reply Score: 3

Wouldn't the money for an Apple Watch...
by torp on Fri 19th Jun 2015 17:04 UTC
torp
Member since:
2010-08-10

... be better spent on treatment for the addiction to notifications? ;)
And I'm speaking from the point of view of a 80% Apple household...

Reply Score: 3

Bill Shooter of Bul
Member since:
2006-07-14

Those things are nice!

Reply Score: 3

RE: I think you sold me on a G Shock
by David on Fri 19th Jun 2015 19:04 UTC in reply to "I think you sold me on a G Shock"
David Member since:
1997-10-01

I can confidently say that if I were to review the Gshock, it would be a more clearly positive review than my Apple Watch one. The Gshock, sadly, doesn't let me monitor how close my Uber is, though.

Reply Score: 1

Bill Shooter of Bul Member since:
2006-07-14

Well, you could appear to be more of a wizard with friends by noting the uber estimated arrival time when ordered and accounting for things like traffic or conditions.

"Well, the ETA was 10 minutes, but my dear watson, the cloud formation at this time of day will reflect the sunlight in a most unpleasant way as the driver makes his way westward down Washington St. He shall be delayed until .. right ... about ... now!"

Tell me that's not cool.

Reply Score: 2

Overpriced, over-hyped
by cmost on Sat 20th Jun 2015 17:16 UTC
cmost
Member since:
2006-07-16

A $549.00 watch that beams text messages from the smart phone in my pocket? Meh! When did it become so laborious to reach into a pocket or purse to retrieve a phone? Most people I know have their phones glued to their hands and their faces glued to the screen 24/7. These smart watches are a solution looking for a problem and Apple, Samsung and the like have brilliant marketing folks who've managed to convince the gullible that a smart watch is something they need. No it isn't. I have a $20.00 analogue watch that I bought from Target years ago that does exactly what I need it to do and it does so exceedingly well.

Edited 2015-06-20 17:17 UTC

Reply Score: 4

Comment by ilovebeer
by ilovebeer on Sun 21st Jun 2015 04:02 UTC
ilovebeer
Member since:
2011-08-08

I have zero interest in buying a cellphone accessory I have to wear on my wrist, and charge more often.

I can see the headlines now... Driver accidentally swerves off road and kills self trying to check a text on new iWatch.

Reply Score: 3

Comment by argimenes
by argimenes on Sun 21st Jun 2015 08:07 UTC
argimenes
Member since:
2015-06-21

Exhibit A:

I'm a notorious mobile computing fanatic and early adopter. [...] While a lot of people were quick to dismiss the whole idea, I've been on board with the idea of a wrist-mounted companion to a smartphone since I first started using a smartphone.

Exhibit B:

I never bought a Pebble or any of the other first generation smart watches, largely because I've been around the block long enough to know that it's hard to be an early adopter, but partially because I wanted to wait and see what Apple would come up with.

Question:
How do these two statements line up? How can you be a notorious mobile computing fanatic and early adopter but at the same time hold off from adopting an early generation smartwatch like the Pebble? That doesn't sound very notorious ... ;-)

Reply Score: 2

Even after reading the article...
by stormcrow on Sun 21st Jun 2015 14:01 UTC
stormcrow
Member since:
2015-03-10

I still don't see a use for a "smart watch". The article itself seems like the author is just trying to justify spending another $350+ because he's afraid he might miss a phone call.

"Girl, please." The world isn't going to end. Good for you, you drank the Apple cool aid, again, and bought a "shiny" like a typical gadget magpie. You're definitely in Apple's demographics.

Reply Score: 2