Linked by David Adams on Thu 27th Aug 2015 00:48 UTC
BSD and Darwin derivatives Jordan Hubbard spoke recently at the Bay Area FreeBSD Users Group to discuss NextBSD, a "spork" of FreeBSD. He "covers why mach ports are extremely useful in some cases and no UNIX IPC primitive is an adequate substitute." There's a video of the BAFUG talk and copies of the original slide deck that goes into some detail about NextBSD.
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NextBSD
by Treza on Thu 27th Aug 2015 01:18 UTC
Treza
Member since:
2006-01-11

Terrible name, too similar to NetBSD.

Reply Score: 3

RE: NextBSD
by Hank on Thu 27th Aug 2015 02:06 UTC in reply to "NextBSD"
Hank Member since:
2006-02-19

Terrible name, too similar to NetBSD.


Funny you should say that, I went to the video expecting something on NetBSD, saw the title in the YouTube clip as "NeXTBSD" and thought it was a typo. Nope ;) . Does Apple still own the copyright on the NeXT moniker btw?

Reply Score: 1

Next?
by Zoidberg on Thu 27th Aug 2015 02:09 UTC
Zoidberg
Member since:
2006-02-11

Doesn't Apple own the Next trademark? I'm not sure how they'll feel about this.

Reply Score: 2

RE: Next?
by unclefester on Thu 27th Aug 2015 04:23 UTC in reply to "Next?"
unclefester Member since:
2007-01-13

No. Apple own the NeXT trademark.

Next is just generic term that can't be trademarked.

Reply Score: 3

RE[2]: Next?
by mkone on Thu 27th Aug 2015 13:48 UTC in reply to "RE: Next?"
mkone Member since:
2006-03-14

No. Apple own the NeXT trademark.

Next is just generic term that can't be trademarked.


Why don't you try calling a computer "Apple" to see just how much a generic term can actually be trademarked?

A generic term can absolutely be trademarked, as long as the term is generally unrelated to the product being sold. So you cannot trademark "computer" to refer to a computer product but you certainly can trademark "Banana" as a brand of computer.

Reply Score: 2

Ne*tBSD
by whartung on Thu 27th Aug 2015 17:12 UTC
whartung
Member since:
2005-07-06

Yea I thought this was about NetBSD as well.

But it looks like FreeBSD is finally officially pulling in all of the bits from the Mac.

That's cool, the Mac bits are pretty nice.

Reply Score: 3

Videos but no text....
by Bill Shooter of Bul on Thu 27th Aug 2015 18:25 UTC
Bill Shooter of Bul
Member since:
2006-07-14

They just don't want to tell me about NextBSD, apparently. Kind of curious how its different from PC BSD.

Reply Score: 2

RE: Videos but no text....
by phoenix on Thu 27th Aug 2015 22:41 UTC in reply to "Videos but no text...."
phoenix Member since:
2005-07-11

The slides are also available.

Reply Score: 2

Comment by tidux
by tidux on Thu 27th Aug 2015 21:25 UTC
tidux
Member since:
2011-08-13

This just proves that most FreeBSD developers are trying to turn it into the server counterpart of OS X. Glad I switched my server back to Debian.

Reply Score: 1

RE: Comment by tidux
by MacMan on Fri 28th Aug 2015 19:33 UTC in reply to "Comment by tidux"
MacMan Member since:
2006-11-19

And what's wrong with that?

The core Darwin OS has some fantastic engineering in it.

Reply Score: 2

RE[2]: Comment by tidux
by darknexus on Mon 31st Aug 2015 00:53 UTC in reply to "RE: Comment by tidux"
darknexus Member since:
2008-07-15

And what's wrong with that?

The core Darwin OS has some fantastic engineering in it.

It's probably not open source enough or some other idealistic crap.

Reply Score: 2

Opposing view
by aargh on Fri 28th Aug 2015 08:18 UTC
aargh
Member since:
2009-10-12
Mach messages vs sysv messages
by SzoylentGreen on Fri 28th Aug 2015 12:50 UTC
SzoylentGreen
Member since:
2013-05-08

How are Mach messages different from SysV messages?

Reply Score: 1

What is it?
by Kebabbert on Mon 31st Aug 2015 16:12 UTC
Kebabbert
Member since:
2007-07-27

Ive googled a bit but can not find information about what NextBSD is. What is it? Just FreeBSD with a Mach kernel?

Reply Score: 2

RE: What is it?
by garyd on Mon 31st Aug 2015 16:44 UTC in reply to "What is it?"
garyd Member since:
2008-10-22

NeXTBSD is based on the FreeBSD-CURRENT kernel plus Mach IPC, Libdispatch, notifyd, asld, launchd, and other components from Apple's open-source Darwin code that comprise the underpinnings of OS X. Considering how many Darwin based OSes have come & gone over the years I am torn between being curious and pessimistic.

Reply Score: 1