Linked by Thom Holwerda on Mon 14th Dec 2015 18:25 UTC
Internet & Networking

I have a Samsung RF4289HARS refrigerator. The Google calendar app on it has been working perfectly since I purchased the refrigerator August 2012. However, with the latest changes in Google Calendar API, I can no longer sign in to my calendar [scroll to top; I have no idea where the permalink is in this horrible UI]. I receive a message stating "Please check your email in Google Calendar website". I can sign in fine on my home PC and have no problem seeing the calendar on my phone. Perhaps this is a Samsung issue, but I thought I would try here first. Has anyone else experienced this problem and what was the solution?

Pretty sure this is in the Book of Revelation somewhere.

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Comment by Drumhellar
by Drumhellar on Mon 14th Dec 2015 18:41 UTC
Drumhellar
Member since:
2005-07-12

Which is lame, because a web-connected calendar is just about only use-case for a smart fridge I can think of...

Reply Score: 3

RE: Comment by Drumhellar
by FunkyELF on Mon 14th Dec 2015 18:48 UTC in reply to "Comment by Drumhellar"
FunkyELF Member since:
2006-07-26

What about a fridge with a camera so you can see what you're already have when you're at the store?
That would be better than a calendar I would think.

Reply Score: 5

RE[2]: Comment by Drumhellar
by boofar on Mon 14th Dec 2015 19:38 UTC in reply to "RE: Comment by Drumhellar"
boofar Member since:
2008-04-23

They tried, but product development stranded on a really weird bug. When the fridge door is open it works perfectly. When closed, the pictures always come out completely black. They nevered figured it out, so they had to cancel it.

Reply Score: 20

RE[3]: Comment by Drumhellar
by cfgr on Wed 16th Dec 2015 09:29 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Comment by Drumhellar"
cfgr Member since:
2009-07-18

Some smart people ran into a very similar issue about a century ago. They came up with a solution that produces photons right when the camera is on, it's called 'flash' I think.

Reply Score: 2

api versioning
by FunkyELF on Mon 14th Dec 2015 18:48 UTC
FunkyELF
Member since:
2006-07-26

Aren't you supposed to version your API endpoints? Why did Google discontinue their old one?

Reply Score: 3

RE: api versioning
by ConceptJunkie on Mon 14th Dec 2015 19:08 UTC in reply to "api versioning"
ConceptJunkie Member since:
2012-05-18

Because that's what Google does. They just drop things at random. Been doing it for years.

Reply Score: 3

RE[2]: api versioning
by galvanash on Mon 14th Dec 2015 20:40 UTC in reply to "RE: api versioning"
galvanash Member since:
2006-01-25

Because that's what Google does. They just drop things at random. Been doing it for years.


3 years of advanced warning is not "random"...

November 17th, 2011
http://googleappsdeveloper.blogspot.com/2011/11/introducing-next-ve...

With our announcement of v3 of the API, we’re also announcing the deprecation of the previous versions (v1 and v2). The older versions enter into a three year deprecation period, beginning today, and will be turned off on November 17, 2014.


Should Google be expected to support old ,antiquated APIs forever - to hell with technological progress and security?

If you have code that uses my API, and you haven't reviewed it for 3 years, me breaking your code is doing a public service to the internet - it should get broken, even if it still works. Unmaintained code is a plague upon humanity.

Or maybe you want to end up with Windows? Because that is how you end up with Windows...

Besides, this is commercial stuff (things like fridges use endpoints dedicated to commercial licensees). Samsung knew it would break in 3 years the day they released the fridge...

Its Samsung's fault - case closed.

Reply Score: 6

RE[3]: api versioning
by WorknMan on Mon 14th Dec 2015 21:00 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: api versioning"
WorknMan Member since:
2005-11-13

Should Google be expected to support old ,antiquated APIs forever - to hell with technological progress and security?


I have observed that a lot of people spend a lot of time updating stuff, not because they want to, but because the new shit is the new hotness, and the old shit is no longer supported. Nevermind that there were people happily using the old shit without a single issue, and never wanted the new shit to begin with.

But we have to toil away like hamsters at these never ending stream of updates. Because progress.

Reply Score: 5

RE[4]: api versioning
by galvanash on Mon 14th Dec 2015 21:24 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: api versioning"
galvanash Member since:
2006-01-25

But we have to toil away like hamsters at these never ending stream of updates. Because progress.


No. Because that is the job...

Reply Score: 2

RE[5]: api versioning
by Lennie on Tue 15th Dec 2015 08:06 UTC in reply to "RE[4]: api versioning"
Lennie Member since:
2007-09-22

I think consumers disagree.

Like Microsoft pushing Windows 10.

Reply Score: 2

RE: api versioning
by darknexus on Mon 14th Dec 2015 19:59 UTC in reply to "api versioning"
darknexus Member since:
2008-07-15

Aren't you supposed to version your API endpoints? Why did Google discontinue their old one?

Because Google is run by geeks, not engineers.

Reply Score: 1

RE[2]: api versioning
by galvanash on Mon 14th Dec 2015 20:54 UTC in reply to "RE: api versioning"
galvanash Member since:
2006-01-25

"Aren't you supposed to version your API endpoints? Why did Google discontinue their old one?

Because Google is run by geeks, not engineers.
"

All of Google's data APIs are versioned... That doesn't mean you support old versions forever...

And you have it backwards... Its geeks that try to ignorantly build things expecting the world to stand still for them and that things will magically work the same way forever.

Engineers maintain their systems, and when you have to break compatibility you support old versions for a reasonable but predetermined amount of time - then you kill old versions aggressively - which is exactly what Google does.

Reply Score: 5

RE[3]: api versioning
by Bobthearch on Mon 14th Dec 2015 21:57 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: api versioning"
Bobthearch Member since:
2006-01-27

In the instance of this particular story, I think a refrigerator should last more than three years. Most people keep fridges and other high-dollar consumer appliances for 20 years or longer.

And people should be able to write and release software without having to provide constant updates for all eternity just because someone (Google in this case, but whoever in general) continually pulls the rug out from under the existing code.

Reply Score: 2

RE[4]: api versioning
by agentj on Mon 14th Dec 2015 22:10 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: api versioning"
agentj Member since:
2005-08-19

I'm sure it's possible to sign contract with Google and pay for API maintenance and support.

Reply Score: 2

RE[5]: api versioning
by Bobthearch on Mon 14th Dec 2015 22:22 UTC in reply to "RE[4]: api versioning"
Bobthearch Member since:
2006-01-27

No, it's not possible, at least not for independent developers or small software companies. Maybe Samsung could afford it, but why should they be financially responsible for fixing Google's sabotage?

Reply Score: 2

RE[6]: api versioning
by Bill Shooter of Bul on Mon 14th Dec 2015 22:40 UTC in reply to "RE[5]: api versioning"
Bill Shooter of Bul Member since:
2006-07-14

If Samsung doesn't like Google's policies, they can choose an alternate vendor for the service. Or maybe not build fridges with calendars in them. Google didn't build and ship the product with a calendar app that didn't work.

Reply Score: 6

RE[7]: api versioning
by Bobthearch on Mon 14th Dec 2015 22:48 UTC in reply to "RE[6]: api versioning"
Bobthearch Member since:
2006-01-27

I said something similar in a lower post:

Samsung's mistake was selling a product that was dependent on Google's services, services that Google has no contractual obligation to maintain or even allow future access.

But to be fair, the calendar app worked just fine when Samsung built and shipped the product. And it was no fault of Samsung's that it stopped working.

Reply Score: 3

RE[6]: api versioning
by pooo on Tue 15th Dec 2015 00:10 UTC in reply to "RE[5]: api versioning"
pooo Member since:
2006-04-22

Are you out of your mind or just trolling? I won't even bother explaining how nuts your comment is.

Reply Score: 2

RE[4]: api versioning
by galvanash on Mon 14th Dec 2015 22:22 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: api versioning"
galvanash Member since:
2006-01-25

In the instance of this particular story, I think a refrigerator should last more than three years. Most people keep fridges and other high-dollar consumer appliances for 20 years or longer.


No argument at all. I completely agree.

And people should be able to write and release software without having to provide constant updates for all eternity just because someone (Google in this case, but whoever in general) continually pulls the rug out from under the existing code.


I don't think a 3 year window equates to requiring "constant updates"... All Samsung has to do is update their firmware - they could have done so anytime since Nov 17th, 2011 when the API they are using was deprecated.

Its not rocket science - review your code once a year or so (in this case 3) and your safe. Expecting things to work forever is incompetent.

Reply Score: 3

RE[5]: api versioning
by Bobthearch on Mon 14th Dec 2015 22:28 UTC in reply to "RE[4]: api versioning"
Bobthearch Member since:
2006-01-27

All Samsung has to do is update their firmware - they could have done so anytime since Nov 17th, 2011 when the API they are using was deprecated.

Its not rocket science - review your code once a year or so (in this case 3) and your safe. Expecting things to work forever is incompetent.


Samsung's mistake was selling a product that was dependent on Google's services, services that Google has no contractual obligation to maintain or even allow future access.

Reply Score: 2

RE[6]: api versioning
by galvanash on Mon 14th Dec 2015 22:49 UTC in reply to "RE[5]: api versioning"
galvanash Member since:
2006-01-25

Samsung's mistake was selling a product that was dependent on Google's services, services that Google has no contractual obligation to maintain or even allow future access.


Your building a strawman... Contract or not, Google neither failed to maintain their API nor failed to allow future access to it. What they did was deprecate it with significant advance notice - and offered a 100% effective (improved even) replacement when they did - you know, what professionals do...

I really don't understand why you insist on arguing that this was anything but what it was - Samsung failing to maintain their codebase properly. Do you seriously think it makes sense to blame Google because Samsung failed to address an issue in their codebase that they were notified about over 3 years ago???

Reply Score: 3

RE[7]: api versioning
by Bobthearch on Mon 14th Dec 2015 23:05 UTC in reply to "RE[6]: api versioning"
Bobthearch Member since:
2006-01-27

My point was, if the refrigerators were programmed to connect to a server at Samsung instead of being dependent on the future goodwill and code stability of Google, there would have been many fewer unhappy customers. It's not like Samsung doesn't have a bit spare space on a server somewhere.

Reply Score: 2

RE[4]: api versioning
by anda_skoa on Tue 15th Dec 2015 14:23 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: api versioning"
anda_skoa Member since:
2005-07-07

And people should be able to write and release software without having to provide constant updates for all eternity


People who sell Internet connected devices should absolutely have to provide constant updates!
Maybe not for eternity but if the target life time is 20 years, then at least for 20 years.

What kind of message does it send if they fail to update an app within a three year time frame?
How likely is it they will release system updates or updates for other network using apps in a timely fashion?

Reply Score: 2

There's a sale on crushed ice...
by andrewclunn on Mon 14th Dec 2015 18:56 UTC
andrewclunn
Member since:
2012-11-05

I can now get this amazing new feature for just $2.99!

Reply Score: 3

Comment by Veto
by Veto on Mon 14th Dec 2015 19:22 UTC
Veto
Member since:
2010-11-13

Thom, while I think I get the gist of your comment, my theology is too rusty to get your biblical reference.

What does the Book of Revelations say that is relevant in this situation?

Reply Score: 1

RE: Comment by Veto
by CaptainN- on Mon 14th Dec 2015 19:27 UTC in reply to "Comment by Veto"
CaptainN- Member since:
2005-07-07

I think Thom was attempting to trivialize this user's experience by comparing it to the end of the world as described in a somewhat old cult story.

Reply Score: 3

RE[2]: Comment by Veto
by gan17 on Mon 14th Dec 2015 19:52 UTC in reply to "RE: Comment by Veto"
gan17 Member since:
2008-06-03

I thought he was just talking about situations like these being prophecized long ago. I mean, we could all see this coming the day smart appliances were announced.

Reply Score: 6

RE[3]: Comment by Veto
by CaptainN- on Mon 14th Dec 2015 21:47 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Comment by Veto"
CaptainN- Member since:
2005-07-07

Hmmm, yeah maybe that fits better. :-)

Reply Score: 2

RE: Comment by Veto
by Bobthearch on Mon 14th Dec 2015 22:03 UTC in reply to "Comment by Veto"
Bobthearch Member since:
2006-01-27

Biblical prophesies are a bit over-dramatic perhaps. ;)

What we're seeing in this case is merely the inevitable outcome and natural consequence of appliances and devices being dependent on 'cloud' technology and infrastructure.

Just wait until Google Doc servers are no longer compatible with 6-month-old smartphones because the devices can't be upgraded to some new software standard. [I'd use the "jerkit" emoticon if we had that]

Reply Score: 5

RE: Comment by Veto
by Pro-Competition on Tue 15th Dec 2015 15:57 UTC in reply to "Comment by Veto"
Pro-Competition Member since:
2007-08-20

Think "Signs of the End of the World".

Reply Score: 2

Why
by hdjhfds on Mon 14th Dec 2015 19:25 UTC
hdjhfds
Member since:
2013-08-19
Google will be making it better
by shotsman on Mon 14th Dec 2015 20:07 UTC
shotsman
Member since:
2005-07-22

After all, all that data slurping that has suddenly gone away will have a hugely detrimental affect on their bottome line.... Yes I am joking.

Personally, anyone who connected up kit like a fridge, light bulb etc to the Internet is a fool. The light bulb gets hacked an then tells your local thieves when you leave home... The fridge gets hacked and the same thieves know when you haven't done your weekly shop because you are going on holiday.

Sorry, this is never gonna happen in my home.
Yes, I'm a grumpy old man but I value my privacy. Perhaps I'm too old but I just can't understand this headlong rush to connect everything to the internet.

Reply Score: 4

RE: Google will be making it better
by Lennie on Tue 15th Dec 2015 08:20 UTC in reply to "Google will be making it better"
Lennie Member since:
2007-09-22

You aren't a grumpy old man, just someone who takes a moment and thinks about the consequences.

Reply Score: 3

Marketing Vs Engineering
by burnttoys on Mon 14th Dec 2015 20:26 UTC
burnttoys
Member since:
2008-12-20

And it's still completely and utterly stupid.

OK, I'm kinda old. The right side of 50 but not by much. I've been into tech since I had to punch hex codes into a 6502. I worked in F1... The last 8 years are all corporate though (I've escaped for now). I've seen this crap over and over. Hint - Dilbert is NOT fiction. Disclaimer - I worked for Samsung!

No offence to anyone - but this product is bullshit. This is what happens when the "pink it a shrink" brigade get a hold of technology.

Here's what _GOOD_ technology for a fridge would be... Proper warnings when the temperature is wrong, chemical sensors for methane and other tracers for rotten food, anything dealing with energy efficiency is cool (pun intended) too. Also - a lock that actually locks the beeping fridge not just locks the settings (yes fridge people I'm looking at all of you with your pointless "lock" buttons)

Web connected fridge? For fucks sake. Other than to fill the requirement of "tell me when the damn thing is broken" I see NO POINT otherwise!!!

Yeah, yeah, it's all neat and cool with cameras here there and everywhere, connected this,that the other, web chat in the fridge but the truth is I have a mobile phone and that isn't going away for 50 years (at least). All those communications requirements are met by my phone.

I don't need or want to spend an extra 100+ dollarpounds on a damn fridge because some jerk in marketing decided to stick a tablet on the front.

TBH - I use a pen and paper to make my shopping lists because the user experience is WAY WAY WAY superior to trying to keep lists on tablet or phones. It's quicker, easier to organise, easier to add and remove items etc... Note also - my shopping consists of much more than just filling my fridge (think cleaning products, non-fridge based food, other groceries, soap, shampoo and all that...)

*SIGH!!!*

Right - grumpy old man feels better now.

Reply Score: 7

RE: Marketing Vs Engineering
by CaptainN- on Mon 14th Dec 2015 21:50 UTC in reply to "Marketing Vs Engineering"
CaptainN- Member since:
2005-07-07

A connected calendar on the family fridge is a GREAT idea. Maybe it doesn't actually need to be on the fridge, but on the other hand, the fridge is a huge powered stationary object, so why not?

Let's get some letter magnet apps on there!

I don't get what all the hand wringing is about, on a website called osnews.com. I thought we are supposed to love tech?

Sheesh.

Reply Score: 4

RE[2]: Marketing Vs Engineering
by Bobthearch on Mon 14th Dec 2015 22:10 UTC in reply to "RE: Marketing Vs Engineering"
Bobthearch Member since:
2006-01-27

A connected calendar on the family fridge is a GREAT idea. Maybe it doesn't actually need to be on the fridge, but on the other hand, the fridge is a huge powered stationary object, so why not?


All of the people who paid premium prices for new-tech features that were rendered useless overnight by a random software update by a third-party service thousands of miles away, and were left hanging without a solution for months and months, I bet they can explain why not. ;)

Reply Score: 2

RE[2]: Marketing Vs Engineering
by burnttoys on Mon 14th Dec 2015 22:51 UTC in reply to "RE: Marketing Vs Engineering"
burnttoys Member since:
2008-12-20

No it doesn't need to be on the fridge.

It's on my phone!

It's a complete waste of resources and is bolted there as a "value add". There's no damn way that thing is going to work in 20 years (or even 10 years) but the fridge will. The "Value Add" is only a value add for the producer and sales people.

To look at this another way - I bought an A2 yearly calendar + pen and stickers for < 2 quid. The pen and stickers can be used again. The calendar is trivially recyclable.

Anyhow... I should stop worrying! I vote with my wallet anyway.

Reply Score: 2

RE[3]: Marketing Vs Engineering
by Sidux on Tue 15th Dec 2015 07:15 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Marketing Vs Engineering"
Sidux Member since:
2015-03-10

We're getting old.
Smartwatches, smart bulb, smat refrigerators. Everything is being digitised and automated mostly because of commodity and coolness factor.
As for revising a calendar app that does just this is kind of a nuisance. Google should at least maintain a compatibility layer with older versions. If others can do it I don't see why Google should act so different.
Nobody expects to maintain or update an older app (just look at how many apps were updated on Windows since 8 came along ..). New stuff has to be sold as well.

Reply Score: 1

RE[3]: Marketing Vs Engineering
by Lennie on Tue 15th Dec 2015 08:22 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Marketing Vs Engineering"
Lennie Member since:
2007-09-22

It's better to just buy a touchscreen and attach that to fridge... maybe something like a tablet computer.

No, that actually would be a tablet computer.

Problem solved.

Reply Score: 3

RE: Marketing Vs Engineering
by tanishaj on Tue 15th Dec 2015 17:48 UTC in reply to "Marketing Vs Engineering"
tanishaj Member since:
2010-12-22

TBH - I use a pen and paper to make my shopping lists because the user experience is WAY WAY WAY superior to trying to keep lists on tablet or phones. It's quicker, easier to organise, easier to add and remove items etc... Note also - my shopping consists of much more than just filling my fridge (think cleaning products, non-fridge based food, other groceries, soap, shampoo and all that...)


Completely agree with you except for the above. Shopping lists on my phone / computer has been a revolution for me.

1) Whenever I remember / encounter that I need something, I can easily add it to my shopping list (possibly with a preferred vendor / destination - eg. Costco or my next trip to the US). The incidents of, "crap, I keep forgetting I need that" have gone down dramatically.

2) I always have my list with me if I find myself near somewhere I visit infrequently but sells things I need (eg. near Home Depot for an unrelated reason or in a town that has a Trader Joes).

3) My wife and I see the same list.

3a) Either of us can add something and the other will know to pick it up when they shop. Getting home to discover that something you added to the list earlier in the day has already been purchased is a miracle.

3b) If either of us buys something, the other knows so we do not both stock up on the same stuff by accident.

4) Frequently purchased items are already on the list. Adding them is extremely fast. Much faster than writing down the long description required to ensure you get the right thing.

5) The data can be analyzed. I have discovered that I need more of a few things to keep from running out and forcing extra shopping trips. We probably save at least one trip to the grocery store per month as a result of this. We also save a bit by discovering that we use some products more than we realized. Buying these in larger volumes saves us a bit of money.

Neither of us is right or wrong. It is just interesting how contrary our experience is here based on how highly aligned our philosophies seem otherwise.

Reply Score: 2

BeIA Refrigerator?
by FuriousGeorge on Mon 14th Dec 2015 21:46 UTC
FuriousGeorge
Member since:
2010-08-26

And they all laughed 16 years ago at the talk of refrigerators as Internet Appliances. Be really was ahead of its time.

Reply Score: 1

RE: BeIA Refrigerator?
by Bobthearch on Mon 14th Dec 2015 22:14 UTC in reply to "BeIA Refrigerator?"
Bobthearch Member since:
2006-01-27

And they all laughed 16 years ago at the talk of refrigerators as Internet Appliances. Be really was ahead of its time.


What would have happened to a $2000 internet appliance when Be Inc. went out of business? I'm guessing not many people would go back in time to buy a BeFridgerator even if they could. lol.

Reply Score: 1

RE[2]: BeIA Refrigerator?
by FuriousGeorge on Tue 15th Dec 2015 07:14 UTC in reply to "RE: BeIA Refrigerator?"
FuriousGeorge Member since:
2010-08-26

"And they all laughed 16 years ago at the talk of refrigerators as Internet Appliances. Be really was ahead of its time.


What would have happened to a $2000 internet appliance when Be Inc. went out of business? I'm guessing not many people would go back in time to buy a BeFridgerator even if they could. lol.
"

I'm not saying anyone should have purchased one, even if it were possible.

I am saying that one of the very concepts they were mocked for now exists. Also, we all own multiple Internet Appliances now.

Reply Score: 2

RE[2]: BeIA Refrigerator?
by StephenBeDoper on Fri 18th Dec 2015 17:12 UTC in reply to "RE: BeIA Refrigerator?"
StephenBeDoper Member since:
2005-07-06

"And they all laughed 16 years ago at the talk of refrigerators as Internet Appliances. Be really was ahead of its time.


What would have happened to a $2000 internet appliance when Be Inc. went out of business?
"

Probably not much, considering that "cloud services" weren't really a "thing" 15 years ago...

Reply Score: 2

RE: BeIA Refrigerator?
by tanishaj on Tue 15th Dec 2015 17:56 UTC in reply to "BeIA Refrigerator?"
tanishaj Member since:
2010-12-22

Being too far ahead of your time is almost worse than being behind the curve from a technology point of view.

Being far to early is a massive business blunder.

One of the keys to Product Management is knowing what is "just now possible or practical". Lots of us have great ideas that we can point to and pretend we invented. Being the company that gets rich commercializing something as a result of great market timing is a lot harder than generically predicting that something will eventually happen or be available.

Being a bit late is ok though and often still very profitable. In fact, the "second" mover often does the best as they enter a small but proven market with probably a better conceived product based on the lessons surfaced by whoever did it first. Both Apple and Microsoft for example hardly ever successfully invent a market. They are just the ones that dominate them to the point that we all forget that they basically just copied somebody else. Microsoft has not been doing this as much lately but I fully expect to see them do it again. They may be getting their mojo back.

Reply Score: 2

Comment by krreagan
by krreagan on Mon 14th Dec 2015 22:18 UTC
krreagan
Member since:
2008-04-08

Samsung will be updating it just as soon as they finish updating their phones...

Reply Score: 7

Needed: One Protocol Droid
by Anachronda on Mon 14th Dec 2015 23:10 UTC
Anachronda
Member since:
2007-04-18

Clearly what we have here is a market opening for protocol droids. Specifically, ones that can speak the binary language of moisture vaporators.

Reply Score: 4

FLOSS might have helped here...
by raboof on Mon 14th Dec 2015 23:15 UTC
raboof
Member since:
2005-07-24

Now if only this calendar app was open-source software running on some open platform, we might have a chance as owners...

I'd actually prefer contributing to such a project over trying to nag the original producer into supporting the app.

Reply Score: 6

daedalus Member since:
2011-01-14

How many fridge owners are happy to compile their own replacement calendar apps? Chances are, not that many. The best way of doing this would be for the fridge to have downloaded an update from Samsung, transparently. It is, after all, connected to the internet. But that would depend on Samsung updating their code which, given the 3 year warning they had and the fact that they rate their fridges for a far longer lifespan than that, they should be doing.

An easier way they could've handled this is to have their own calendar service running on their own server. After all, don't they replace the Google calendar with their own Samsung one on their phones? They could even connect it to Google calendar server-side, in which case they'd only need to update their server code and magically all their fridges would still work without any change in service for the customer.

As a sidenote, I'm not a huge lover of Samsung's mechanical products. Their electronics seem fine, but mechanically they're lacking in reliability...

Reply Score: 3

raboof Member since:
2005-07-24

How many fridge owners are happy to compile their own replacement calendar apps? Chances are, not that many.


If I'd have such a fridge, then one: me. And that's basically enough ;) .

But that would depend on Samsung updating their code


I totally agree Samsung *should* support its software, but I don't want to be dependent on it.

Reply Score: 2

"Smart" refrigerator???
by vasko_dinkov on Tue 15th Dec 2015 09:25 UTC
vasko_dinkov
Member since:
2005-09-13

That's what you are asking for when you buy a "smart" refrigerator...

Reply Score: 1

Go open source!
by ThomasFuhringer on Tue 15th Dec 2015 10:11 UTC
ThomasFuhringer
Member since:
2007-01-25

Time to jailbreak it and install Linux.
I am sure someone out there built a distribution for it.

Reply Score: 2

Comment by Dr-ROX
by Dr-ROX on Tue 15th Dec 2015 10:26 UTC
Dr-ROX
Member since:
2006-01-03

Another way to use smart refrigerators is to show ads on it's screen. For example you could register with shops which would provide you discounts, but you would get ads on your fridge.

Reply Score: 2

SmartTVs too
by Tero on Tue 15th Dec 2015 14:37 UTC
Tero
Member since:
2013-07-12

I had the same problem with my LG SmartTV, one day I turned it on and saw a notice about end of service for all google-based apps and no clear way to replace them with newer apps.
That day I decided to never buy again a "smart" device

Reply Score: 1

why didn't they use Tizen?
by unclefester on Wed 16th Dec 2015 00:04 UTC
unclefester
Member since:
2007-01-13

Why didn't they use Tizen?

Reply Score: 2

Comment by ilovebeer
by ilovebeer on Wed 16th Dec 2015 00:17 UTC
ilovebeer
Member since:
2011-08-08

People have managed for decades to use refrigerators perfectly fine without internet connectivity. I suspect the same will hold true as long as refrigerators continue to exist. And really, do we need even more things tracking us and inevitably being used to spam us with advertising? HELL NO.

Cramming internet connectivity and tracking into everything that uses power is going to generate far more anger and rage than it ever will convenience.

Reply Score: 2