Linked by Thom Holwerda on Thu 11th Feb 2016 23:56 UTC
In the News

A team of scientists announced on Thursday that they had heard and recorded the sound of two black holes colliding a billion light-years away, a fleeting chirp that fulfilled the last prediction of Einstein’s general theory of relativity.

That faint rising tone, physicists say, is the first direct evidence of gravitational waves, the ripples in the fabric of space-time that Einstein predicted a century ago. (Listen to it here.) It completes his vision of a universe in which space and time are interwoven and dynamic, able to stretch, shrink and jiggle. And it is a ringing confirmation of the nature of black holes, the bottomless gravitational pits from which not even light can escape, which were the most foreboding (and unwelcome) part of his theory.

More generally, it means that a century of innovation, testing, questioning and plain hard work after Einstein imagined it on paper, scientists have finally tapped into the deepest register of physical reality, where the weirdest and wildest implications of Einstein’s universe become manifest.

The entirety of today I've been in awe over just how far science has come. The idea of measuring a ripple in spacetime at 1/100,000 of a nanometer, about the width of an atomic nucleus, using lasers and mirrors - I don't know, it's just awe-inspiring what we, as humans, can do when we get together in the name of science, instead of fighting each other over endless strings of pointlessness.

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Ingenuity
by kwan_e on Fri 12th Feb 2016 01:13 UTC
kwan_e
Member since:
2007-02-18

The experiment design is just as ingenious. They actually create fake signals from time to time to make sure that they weren't fooling themselves.

And even a detector with the sensitivity of LIGO cannot detect the active ingredient in homeopathic bullshit.

Reply Score: 8

v RE: Ingenuity
by catonic on Fri 12th Feb 2016 01:43 UTC in reply to "Ingenuity"
RE: Ingenuity
by teco.sb on Fri 12th Feb 2016 02:13 UTC in reply to "Ingenuity"
teco.sb Member since:
2014-05-08

The experiment design is just as ingenious. They actually create fake signals from time to time to make sure that they weren't fooling themselves.

In my opinion, this is, by far, the coolest thing physicist discovered this century! We're still at the beginning of the century, but I think it'll be tough to top this one. The Higgs Boson was really cool, too, but just the thought that space-time can warp is beyond imagination.

I'm a mechanical engineer, so I have classical mechanics ingrained in my brain. It took me a while to even wrap my head around relativity and the space-time concept. Cool video that helped me understand it a little better: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jlTVIMOix3I

Reply Score: 2

RE[2]: Ingenuity
by kwan_e on Fri 12th Feb 2016 08:15 UTC in reply to "RE: Ingenuity"
kwan_e Member since:
2007-02-18

"The experiment design is just as ingenious. They actually create fake signals from time to time to make sure that they weren't fooling themselves.

In my opinion, this is, by far, the coolest thing physicist discovered this century!
"

They're expect tens of events per year now. This then will allow us to at least raise the question whether we can observe what happens when relativity meets quantum mechanics.

Stephen Hawking recently announced, with much controversy and misunderstanding, that he didn't think black holes (in purely relativistic formulations) exist because the quantum effects at the event horizon created a firewall. If true, could it effect how gravitational waves are emitted and hopefully we'll collect enough events eventually to see anything.

* I don't actually know what I'm talking about. I'm only an enthusiast.

Reply Score: 2

RE[2]: Ingenuity
by JLF65 on Fri 12th Feb 2016 18:39 UTC in reply to "RE: Ingenuity"
JLF65 Member since:
2005-07-06

Here's a REALLY good channel for all this sciency stuff:

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC7_gcs09iThXybpVgjHZ_7g/videos

That's PBS Space Time - a really good program covering things like gravity waves and relativity and the like.

Reply Score: 2

RE: Ingenuity
by Deviate_X on Fri 12th Feb 2016 08:36 UTC in reply to "Ingenuity"
Deviate_X Member since:
2005-07-11

The experiment design is just as ingenious. They actually create fake signals from time to time to make sure that they weren't fooling themselves.

And even a detector with the sensitivity of LIGO cannot detect the active ingredient in homeopathic bullshit.


We should all take the time to try and understand a little:

https://youtu.be/zyYSGYz6fGs?t=2m

About the unimaginably small:

https://youtu.be/zyYSGYz6fGs?t=22m30s

Reply Score: 2

RE: Ingenuity
by mtn-_- on Fri 12th Feb 2016 11:54 UTC in reply to "Ingenuity"
mtn-_- Member since:
2007-04-11


And even a detector with the sensitivity of LIGO cannot detect the active ingredient in homeopathic bullshit.

Dude, the placebo effect is real. So how can we use it for humanities benefit? Enter homeopathy ;-)

Reply Score: 2

RE[2]: Ingenuity
by kwan_e on Fri 12th Feb 2016 12:01 UTC in reply to "RE: Ingenuity"
kwan_e Member since:
2007-02-18

If you think about it, neither of our comments are in conflict. Homeopathy is just a placebo (at best). But placebos have no active ingredient to detect either.

Reply Score: 3

RE[3]: Ingenuity
by Bill Shooter of Bul on Fri 12th Feb 2016 14:31 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Ingenuity"
Bill Shooter of Bul Member since:
2006-07-14

The difficulty is when do you abandon a placebo for real medical treatment? If the answer is never, then that's a problem.

I do have friends that have crazy ideas on what keeps them healthy or what cures a cold that have no basis in medical research. But, I do believe there is a strong placebo effect in place, so as long as their cures don't harm them and don't prevent them from seeking real medical care when necessary, I re-enforce their beliefs to boost the effect.

The only issue I have is one of the common ones is a really bad one for my personal medical conditions. So, I have to excuse myself from that...

Reply Score: 2

RE[4]: Ingenuity
by kwan_e on Fri 12th Feb 2016 15:21 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: Ingenuity"
kwan_e Member since:
2007-02-18

I think a big part of the problem is that we seem to have a lot of unneeded medicines for not-very-serious illnesses. Then let's not forget that we now know most cancer treatment studies simply have not been reproduced.

Reply Score: 2

RE[5]: Ingenuity
by piotr.dobrogost on Fri 12th Feb 2016 16:48 UTC in reply to "RE[4]: Ingenuity"
piotr.dobrogost Member since:
2011-10-04

Then let's not forget that we now know most cancer treatment studies simply have not been reproduced.


Could you elaborate?
Thanks in advance.

Reply Score: 1

RE[6]: Ingenuity
by kwan_e on Fri 12th Feb 2016 18:15 UTC in reply to "RE[5]: Ingenuity"
kwan_e Member since:
2007-02-18
RE[4]: Ingenuity
by galvanash on Fri 12th Feb 2016 22:58 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: Ingenuity"
galvanash Member since:
2006-01-25

I do have friends that have crazy ideas on what keeps them healthy or what cures a cold that have no basis in medical research.


I look at it like this. If you believe in and use homeopathy (or mediums, or palm readers, or astrology, or name your snake oil) you are probably just a harmless new age hippy. Whatever, as long as your not hurting someone else that is your business.

But if you SELL homeopathy (or whatever) you are a bottom feeding scumbag. Your either criminally negligent or perpetrating fraud - either way you should get shut down.

Taking advantage of ignorance to turn a buck isn't "new age", its just sleazy.

Reply Score: 2

Cool
by WorknMan on Fri 12th Feb 2016 02:04 UTC
WorknMan
Member since:
2005-11-13

I think one day, we will unlock the secrets of the universe. That is, if we don't destroy ourselves first.

Reply Score: 3

RE: Cool
by gan17 on Fri 12th Feb 2016 02:29 UTC in reply to "Cool"
gan17 Member since:
2008-06-03

Whatever happens, the most important thing is that I've got a new gravitational wave ringtone for my phone.

Edited 2016-02-12 02:29 UTC

Reply Score: 9

RE: Cool
by Sodki on Fri 12th Feb 2016 06:14 UTC in reply to "Cool"
Sodki Member since:
2005-11-10

I think one day, we will unlock the secrets of the universe.


We are doing it already on a daily (-ish) basis.

Reply Score: 3

Remarkable Relativity
by FortranMan on Fri 12th Feb 2016 03:39 UTC
FortranMan
Member since:
2011-12-21

This marks the successful test of another prediction made by the theory of relativity. As far a scientific theories go, it has been very long-lived and successful. There have been many times that we have tested the theory and it could have been wrong, or not quite right, but it continues to give correct predictions to our experiments.

Very impressive work, both then to develop the theory and now to test it.

Reply Score: 4

Amazing
by abraxas on Fri 12th Feb 2016 04:05 UTC
abraxas
Member since:
2005-07-07

As if we didn't already know how much of a genius Einstein was this confirms it once again. This is going to lead to an even greater understanding of the Universe.

Edited 2016-02-12 04:05 UTC

Reply Score: 4

Immense
by project_2501 on Fri 12th Feb 2016 08:52 UTC
project_2501
Member since:
2006-03-20

This is momentous. The rare kind of discovery that peels back another layer of mystery to reveal how our universe (or our perception of it) works.

I could have joked and said - we can measure gravity waves smaller disturbing the already noisy earth by a subatomic size ... we can have billions of people on untethered devices partaking the multimedia internet, we can photograph Pluto at close quarters ....

... Yet we still can't do an open source desktop!

But I won't make such a joke. Oops.

Seriously though - the is more food than people on earth and we can't get that right....

Reply Score: 2

RE: Immense
by Brendan on Fri 12th Feb 2016 12:05 UTC in reply to "Immense"
Brendan Member since:
2005-11-16

HI,

I could have joked and said - we can measure gravity waves smaller disturbing the already noisy earth by a subatomic size ... we can have billions of people on untethered devices partaking the multimedia internet, we can photograph Pluto at close quarters ....

... Yet we still can't do an open source desktop!

But I won't make such a joke. Oops.


A was thinking of something more like...

Einstein: Been dead for over 60 years but he's still making "waves"... ;-)

- Brendan

Reply Score: 7

RE: Immense
by kwan_e on Fri 12th Feb 2016 12:14 UTC in reply to "Immense"
kwan_e Member since:
2007-02-18

... Yet we still can't do an open source desktop!

But I won't make such a joke. Oops.

Seriously though - the is more food than people on earth and we can't get that right....


Interestingly, Einstein also predicted your joke:

"Only two things are infinite, the universe and human stupidity, and I'm not sure about the former."

Reply Score: 5

Science/working together/competition/wars
by Lennie on Fri 12th Feb 2016 09:23 UTC
Lennie
Member since:
2007-09-22

You might think working together is the solution to these problems. But wars and fear of war brought us computers, cheap electronics and encryption. And the free market works by creating competition.

I don't think we'd have those without wars and competition. At least all statistics for wars and violence point down.

So we kind of needed wars, it truly is a strange world to life in.

Reply Score: 4

daveak Member since:
2008-12-29

Thank you Mr Morden.

Reply Score: 5

bn-7bc Member since:
2005-09-04

Hmm the Shadws are everywhere, they are gethering strengt.... Don´t have anything to do with this person if you don´t absolutly have to

Reply Score: 1

Bill Shooter of Bul Member since:
2006-07-14

Disagree. We can have scientific discoveries, as long as there is a decent profit margin in them. More basic ones like this, well we need government support. We've been doing ok since the end of the cold war. Could be better, but not terrible. We've still found the higgs and gravitational waves.

And the higgs was the result of international co-operation at an unprecedented scale.

Reply Score: 2

darknexus Member since:
2008-07-15

Disagree. We can have scientific discoveries, as long as there is a decent profit margin in them. More basic ones like this, well we need government support.

And what event, more than any other, fuels the governments to support the sciences at an unprecedented scale?

Reply Score: 3

Lennie Member since:
2007-09-22

I'm not saying businesses are the biggest investors in fundamental research.

My opinion is: the government is the biggest venture capital funder of all ! They fund long term projects with great risk of failure.

A simple example of the long term investment is the Internet, it's a 10 year project from ARPANET to the protocols that underpin the Internet right now (not sure if that was perceived as a risky project, but at least it's an example of long term investment).

What I meant is: it's kind of strange how ARPA (currently called DARPA) ended up being the organisation that funded it. Their incentive was the cold war.

Edited 2016-02-12 22:11 UTC

Reply Score: 2

darknexus Member since:
2008-07-15

You've hit the nail on the head. Nothing seems to motivate our species like the threat of annihilation, or the possibility of annihilating someone else. It's twisted, but even the very scientific equipment that made this discovery has come, in no small part, from our desire to kill one another. Without conflict, humanity stagnates. It's an ugly truth.

Reply Score: 4

Gullible Jones Member since:
2006-05-23

Violence isn't the only possible source of conflict. Notice for instance how the natural world is full of pathogens, parasites, and general unfairness.

War got us a lot of the way here. That doesn't mean it's a good choice for moving forward.

Reply Score: 2

darknexus Member since:
2008-07-15

War got us a lot of the way here. That doesn't mean it's a good choice for moving forward.

I doubt most people think it is, save perhaps some of our politicians with money interests in it. Doesn't change the way things have been though, and unfortunately the way things are likely to continue until more people consciously decide to stop making the violent choices. Most people don't decide to go to war in order to fuel progress, yet progress s often the result. One does not have to like a fact in order to understand that it is reality.

Edited 2016-02-12 16:55 UTC

Reply Score: 2

winter skies Member since:
2009-08-21

Most people don't decide to go to war in order to fuel progress, yet progress s often the result. One does not have to like a fact in order to understand that it is reality.


Is there undeniable proof of this on the long term?
This is an interpretation of reality, not reality itself. Justifying a belief makes it more true, so thinking that war has the side effect of fostering progress might make people who are not directly hit by conflicts more willing to accept war as a rule. It might have some influence on policy making and stuff, so I think there might be some ethical issues with promoting this Weltanschauung.
Progress in itself is often seen as something necessarily positive, while defining "progress" and accepting the partial disconnection of at least part of its meanings from the quality of people's lives is necessary as well. Measuring the strength of the link between technological progress and medical progress would be needed as well in order to paint a more realistic scene...

Reply Score: 2

Gullible Jones Member since:
2006-05-23

Can you please dial down the condescension a bit?

I agree about violence being a source of technological progress. My disagreement is about it being the only major source of progress.

Edit: maybe more to the point...

a) My culture at least tends to have a somewhat biased view of technology. Look at science fiction, probably 80% of it focuses on weapons and transportation tech. Not much stuff about the effect of domestic tech developments - indoor plumbing, appliances, you name it - which can have at least as much impact.

(Not necessarily for the better, either. See for instance the cotton gin, and slavery in the US South.)

b) Since this is an OS news site, let's drag in software examples. MapReduce and Hadoop, for instance, are not developments on the scale of the original computers, but they are developments, and not spurred on directly by violent conflict. Hell, the same applies to UNIX.

Edited 2016-02-12 17:34 UTC

Reply Score: 2

Lennie Member since:
2007-09-22

All I meant was: wars have motivated people to do a lot of things in the past. And some turned out to be good and useful in other settings.

Not saying we need more wars. Statistics show we are actually becoming less violent as a species on average every decade.

I'll even say that wars or competition in a free market still might not be the route to solve problems certain problems. For example finding cures for cancer. Which demand lots of investment with a lot of risk of failure (finding out the potential solution didn't work).

Reply Score: 2

Gullible Jones Member since:
2006-05-23

FWIW I was responding to darknexus, not to you. In part because said poster has pushed certain... morally extreme viewpoints, in other threads. (And sorry for the late reply, one of the ad servers was hanging and preventing OSNews from loading.)

I'm still not sure if I can agree with what you're saying, simply because there are too many unknowns and nothing to compare to. And technology isn't purely a response to existential threats, it can also be general problem solving.

Basically I'm not convinced we would be technologically worse off if WWII hadn't happened. Technologically different, yes, but not necessarily worse off.

(Also, while the application of science gets a boost during wars, a lot of the theoretical groundwork has historically occurred during peacetime. Special Relativity for instance... And people were researching radioactivity before the first World War broke out.)

...

BTW, I'm not sure if the statistics on violence are actually accurate. And while violence per capita at least appears to be dropping, we're still in pretty bad shape globally.

Reply Score: 2

Lennie Member since:
2007-09-22

FWIW I was responding to darknexus, not to you. In part because said poster has pushed certain... morally extreme viewpoints, in other threads. (And sorry for the late reply, one of the ad servers was hanging and preventing OSNews from loading.)


Sorry, about responding in place of someone else.

I'm still not sure if I can agree with what you're saying, simply because there are too many unknowns and nothing to compare to. And technology isn't purely a response to existential threats, it can also be general problem solving.

Basically I'm not convinced we would be technologically worse off if WWII hadn't happened. Technologically different, yes, but not necessarily worse off.

(Also, while the application of science gets a boost during wars, a lot of the theoretical groundwork has historically occurred during peacetime. Special Relativity for instance... And people were researching radioactivity before the first World War broke out.)


Take my example of modern cryptography I mentioned in an other part of this thread. Without governments willing to spend a lot of money I don't think we would have had it. Obviously in a completely benign society we wouldn't need it... but let's be clear that was unlikely to happen any time soon. Even nature is not a nice place. ARPA (research arm of the US military, now called DARPA) was the organisation that funded the development of the Internet for over 10 years then gave it away. For some developments you need to have the right incentives to be aligned.

BTW, I'm not sure if the statistics on violence are actually accurate. And while violence per capita at least appears to be dropping, we're still in pretty bad shape globally.


If you look up the statistics, it's better pretty much everywhere. It's a clear trend over the ages.

Edited 2016-02-13 19:59 UTC

Reply Score: 2

Lennie Member since:
2007-09-22

Maybe I should add something:

I'm not a 100% sure, but I think we might have invented most things we needed from being invented through conflict. Maybe better rockets would be a good development, but I don't want to risk a war with rockets and what I think we really need is more efficient rockets, which might not be what you get from wars anyway.

So I'm all for no more conflict. :-)

Reply Score: 2

daveak Member since:
2008-12-29

Wars lead to increased collaboration between people. It is therefore people coming together for a common cause that leads to the progress not the war itself.

Reply Score: 2

Lennie Member since:
2007-09-22

I like your positive look on this subject. I hope I agree.

Reply Score: 2

allanregistos Member since:
2011-02-10

Wars lead to increased collaboration between people. It is therefore people coming together for a common cause that leads to the progress not the war itself.


What a twisted logic.

Yes, indeed wars increased collaboration such as how to make rockets be it for space exploration or to annihilate other human beings. Russia and the U.S. divided among themselves the German tech for them to accelerate the development of missile technology. We can collaborate without ever needing wars(and its happening now), to say otherwise is a form of insanity.

Reply Score: 2

daveak Member since:
2008-12-29

You misunderstand. I agree with you. I am not saying war is the only thing that causes collaboration but that the advances gain during periods of war happen not because of the war, but because of collaboration. If people collaborated more instead of trying to screw each other over for profit / fame the advances would come just as fast.

Reply Score: 2

tylerdurden Member since:
2009-03-17


So we kind of needed wars, it truly is a strange world to life in.


No we don't need wars, that just the statist conditioning you (we all really) have been subjected since you were born. I.e. This experiment, and the results it provided, is actually a great example of war not being needed to conduct massive advances in basic scientific research.

Reply Score: 2

Lennie Member since:
2007-09-22

I'm just saying: certain inventions might not have happened without wars. Not saying we need wars to move forward.

I actually believe, even if it's a very small chance, but it might be true: technological progress might be on a Moore's Law like trajectory, ever increasing (Singularity anyone ?).

I'm just saying we needed some of these inventions to get on the path we are now on.

Reply Score: 2

allanregistos Member since:
2011-02-10

I'm just saying: certain inventions might not have happened without wars. Not saying we need wars to move forward.

I actually believe, even if it's a very small chance, but it might be true: technological progress might be on a Moore's Law like trajectory, ever increasing (Singularity anyone ?).

I'm just saying we needed some of these inventions to get on the path we are now on.


Please list those inventions as a result of wars.

Reply Score: 2

kwan_e Member since:
2007-02-18

The entire space programs of the cold war was a result of mutual suspicion of each other.

Reply Score: 2

nicubunu Member since:
2014-01-08

are you certain that would have not happened anyway, even if a while later?

Reply Score: 2

kwan_e Member since:
2007-02-18

are you certain that would have not happened anyway, even if a while later?


Look at the money (and freedoms) people were willing to throw at it. Compare it to now or any other time in history. The lives at risk, the extreme uncertainty.

Hell, the superconducting super collider in Texas would have discovered the Higgs Boson way sooner and they didn't even want to throw a comparatively small amount of money at that.

Compare all this to the F-35ing JSF. In it's short run it's managed to waste more money than the entire Space Shuttle program over its entire life time. And the thing can barely fly let alone make into space... how many times the Space Shuttles have? When there's wars to be won and imaginary bogeymen to defeat, people will be crazy with money.

Reply Score: 2

Lennie Member since:
2007-09-22

Let's take some examples from the field of computing:
- modern cryptography
- modern general purpose computing

Also (D)ARPA funded a bunch of stuff:
- Internet (ARPA funded the development of ARPANET and Internet for over 10 years)
- self driving cars

I wonder if we would have had modern cryptography without conflict between countries.

Reply Score: 2

CodeMonkey Member since:
2005-09-22

Let's take some examples from the field of computing


For another example:
Advanced computing architectures usually first show up in High Performance Computing, or "Supercomputing", systems. After a few years that technology then makes it's way into enterprise and eventually consumer products. At any given time, half of the top supercomputing systems are usually in the US at various Department of Energy labs (Los Alamos, Oak Ridge, Sandia, Livermore, etc.), which, more often than not, are primarily used for nuclear weapons simulations and research.

Reply Score: 2

Lennie Member since:
2007-09-22

Sometimes we do have to admit that even fun and games can lead to something.

I do think a lot of GPU work went from PC/console games to General Purpose GPU computing in super computers and other fields like machine learning.

Reply Score: 2

Morgan Member since:
2005-06-29

I think this is the first time you and I agree 100%. Bravo, very well said.

Reply Score: 2

War and development speed
by acobar on Sat 13th Feb 2016 16:33 UTC
acobar
Member since:
2005-11-15

Frankly, when I see people arguing that war and fear of war may foster the adoption and development of new technologies it send shivers through my spine. How can we be so sure of that?

Lets examine some counter arguments:
- By war and by violence, millions of young people died before they were able to show their full potential. How many could be like Einstein, Newton, Euler and Archimedes (the last one thought to be killed by a stupid invader) ?
- By war and violence, lots of knowledge were destructed and had to be developed again (see Roman Empire concrete tech or Greek lost techs). Lots of time wasted;
- Because of war mongers, lots of things about knowledge were not shared. Again, think how much this hindered the progress of human beings;
- Because of stupid wars, billions of people suffered or died young and as so had their ONLY LIFE compromised. There is not enough richness on our solar system to compensate just one of them.

I would actually argument the opposite, war and fear of war hindered progress.

Unluckily we are violent, perhaps, it is programmed on ours genes, but it is not something RIGHT EDUCATION can not fix.

Edited 2016-02-13 16:35 UTC

Reply Score: 3

Waiting for the final word....
by jerkofalltrades on Sun 14th Feb 2016 01:02 UTC
jerkofalltrades
Member since:
2012-12-11

As anyone who has read many papers and articles about big discoveries in the scientific arena, I know it's better to sit and wait for the scientific method run it's full course.

I'm very excited about the implications of this discovery but there will be lots of peer reviewing to take place (yes we don't just depend on the guys doing the measurements alone!). But if we can see more results like this in the future and remove all doubts of their source it's a big day for physics!

Reply Score: 2

RE: Waiting for the final word....
by acobar on Sun 14th Feb 2016 09:45 UTC in reply to "Waiting for the final word...."
acobar Member since:
2005-11-15

I was going to post something similar but did not want to be the guy that "spoils the party". ;)

The margins are too thin and there are lots of unknowns yet.

Anyway, looking forward for a huge confirmation by the research community.

Einstein mind and imagination were truly impressive, almost unbelievable / superhuman. Impressive also was the quality of Germany science at that time. It was very said that the sequence of events there resulted on one of the worst periods for humankind.

Reply Score: 3

Prophet Thom
by FooBar2 on Mon 15th Feb 2016 08:30 UTC
FooBar2
Member since:
2016-02-15

Apparently, Thom is now removing comments he does not like and even deleting users without any explanation or warning.
Really mature. Yet somehow after reading his "opinions" for some time I'm not surprised at all.

Reply Score: 1

RE: Prophet Thom
by acobar on Mon 15th Feb 2016 12:32 UTC in reply to "Prophet Thom"
acobar Member since:
2005-11-15

This is a serious accusation for a site with comment moderation and where the most important assets are really the comments.

I thought the instance of Thom about disagreement was like "I disapprove of what you say, but I will defend to the death your right to say it".

Do you have any proof to back your claims ?

Reply Score: 2

RE[2]: Prophet Thom
by darknexus on Tue 16th Feb 2016 14:55 UTC in reply to "RE: Prophet Thom"
darknexus Member since:
2008-07-15

He has done this before, though in the past he has admitted when he's done it and locked the thread as it had degenerated into pointless insults. I don't remember what it was exactly, but a few years back we had a thread that somehow degenerated into some sort of Mormon vs other Christian hate. He deleted the thread and locked it, then put up a post on why it had been done. I'm sure it's in the archives somewhere, however I can't seem to locate it.
All this is to say that I doubt he deleted a user without either a. warning or b. a reason. If he were going to delete people he disagrees with, I'd have been gone long ago.

Reply Score: 2

Perplexing Concept of the Merge
by MadRat on Tue 16th Feb 2016 04:54 UTC
MadRat
Member since:
2006-02-17

Did anyone catch the relatively slow rotation of the black holes before the merge? I imagine material so dense that it cannot pack together any further, so it should be basically a couple of marbles stuck together, each with 10-30 sun masses. The ripples of gravity must be space-time disruption of some type otherwise the relatively close distance should be imperceptible if they are aligned parallel or perpendicular to us.

Reply Score: 2

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