Linked by Thom Holwerda on Fri 15th Apr 2016 21:27 UTC
Games

When I visited Jordan at his home in New Jersey, he sat in his family's living room at dusk, lit by a glowing iMac screen, and mused on Minecraft's appeal. "It's like the earth, the world, and you’re the creator of it," he said. On-screen, he steered us over to the entrance to the maze, and I peered in at the contraptions chugging away. "My art teacher always says, 'No games are creative, except for the people who create them.' But she said, 'The only exception that I have for that is Minecraft.'" He floated over to the maze's exit, where he had posted a sign for the survivors: The journey matters more than what you get in the end.

Minecraft is the digital age's Lego.

Order by: Score:
Creativity in games.
by Alfman on Fri 15th Apr 2016 23:01 UTC
Alfman
Member since:
2011-01-28

I think back to the early ASCII BBS games I played, the primary appeal (for me) was creativity. You didn't play them for the eye candy, their creativity is what made them addictive. You went about build up your territories by modifying the environment, collecting objects, interacting with others, forming teams, etc. In those days you had to use your imagination a lot more, but just because these games are graphically obsolete doesn't mean they weren't creative, at least in my opinion.


Although I never had much appeal for minecraft, I will give minecraft credit for being very accessible to modern audiences. It seems to have a lot of commonalty with second life, which was also extremely popular back in the day. I wonder where the baton will go after minecraft?

Reply Score: 6

RE: Creativity in games.
by Doc Pain on Sat 16th Apr 2016 10:21 UTC in reply to "Creativity in games."
Doc Pain Member since:
2006-10-08

I think back to the early ASCII BBS games I played, the primary appeal (for me) was creativity. You didn't play them for the eye candy, their creativity is what made them addictive.


I'd like to add another aspect I think is important:

Good games can "attract" the player. This attraction is not required to be done by eye candy - it can be done with a great story, a great gaming concept, or the opportunity of being creative. This "immersive effect" will lead to something special: The "imperfect world" of the bulky pixels, the blurry textures or the crappy sound will be "perfected" by the brain of the player, which makes him "enter the world" of the game he's playing. That's why even "imperfect" games (such that are non-realistic in their presentation of eye candy) can fascinate the player so much that it doesn't matter how "imperfect" the visual or audible aspects of the game are.

A good example for this theory is the first generation of ego shooters that could impose psychosomatic reactions on the player's body. Fear, shock, success. Later games that added the dimension of height could lead the body to show the "oh god I'm falling" feeling. Later games introducing the concept of "flying" (full 3D without gravity) would interestingly rise different feelings.

All this was possible in 320x200x256 and 800x600x65536 visual. :-)

You went about build up your territories by modifying the environment, collecting objects, interacting with others, forming teams, etc. In those days you had to use your imagination a lot more, but just because these games are graphically obsolete doesn't mean they weren't creative, at least in my opinion.


Exactly. Those games, even when presented in 80x25x16 text mode, could do that. The game designers of course relied on the requirement that the player would use his imagination, which was neccessary to make the game appealing. Things like the level of "handholding" and the ability to read or explore "instructions" were important for gameplay.

See the video "If Quake was done today" for comparison:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W1ZtBCpo0eU

Reply Score: 3

RE[2]: Creativity in games.
by agentj on Sat 16th Apr 2016 14:48 UTC in reply to "RE: Creativity in games."
agentj Member since:
2005-08-19


All this was possible in 320x200x256 and 800x600x65536 visual. :-)


So it's size of post stamp on modern displays ...

Reply Score: 2

RE[3]: Creativity in games.
by Doc Pain on Sat 16th Apr 2016 15:15 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Creativity in games."
Doc Pain Member since:
2006-10-08

"
All this was possible in 320x200x256 and 800x600x65536 visual. :-)


So it's size of post stamp on modern displays ...
"

Yes, except you "magnify" the pixels and end up with a quite blocky graphics. Minecraft is a good example for this concept, but there are many games that try to work with that specific "look and feel".

Traditional CRTs that could operate on different resolutions would simply switch to another mode when fullscreen was requested. Flat panels usually can do the same, either by their software, by the GPU driver, by a means of the windowing manager ("virtual desktop" with partial magnification) or by the game itself. But just try to impress a "modern brain" with a 320x200x256 game of "DooM" on a 40" 16:9 "squished" flat panel... ;-)

Reply Score: 3

RE: Creativity in games.
by darknexus on Mon 18th Apr 2016 15:21 UTC in reply to "Creativity in games."
darknexus Member since:
2008-07-15

Another cool thing about a lot of those old text games is their accessibility to a wider range of people. Those without good vision can't enjoy the games of today, ditto those without hearing. Both of these groups can enjoy text-based games equally well, precisely because it is the game and the story that is everything. The "effects" are all done in your own brain.

Reply Score: 2

Comment by ilovebeer
by ilovebeer on Wed 20th Apr 2016 14:42 UTC
ilovebeer
Member since:
2011-08-08

"Minecraft is the digital age's Lego."

Not even close. Minecraft is wildly popular with both kids and adults, there's no question. But, it's not in the same league as Lego is with either group.

Reply Score: 2