Linked by Thom Holwerda on Tue 17th Jan 2017 00:05 UTC
Legal

The sprawling investigation into President Park Geun-hye of South Korea took a dramatic turn on Monday with word that prosecutors were seeking the arrest of the de facto head of Samsung, one of the world's largest conglomerates, on charges that he bribed the president and her secretive confidante.

Nobody should be able to escape justice - not even CEOs. I know of a few others who need to follow in Lee's footsteps.

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Wait...
by SitrucKram on Tue 17th Jan 2017 02:38 UTC
SitrucKram
Member since:
2013-12-02

I thought the heir to Samsung would be arrested on...battery.


I'll see myself out.

Reply Score: 9

RE: Wait...
by darknexus on Tue 17th Jan 2017 12:39 UTC in reply to "Wait..."
darknexus Member since:
2008-07-15

Awww, groan. Still, it made me smile. ;)

Reply Score: 2

Check the system
by sklofur on Tue 17th Jan 2017 03:49 UTC
sklofur
Member since:
2016-03-28

Another factor here to keep in mind is that charges for bribery and corruption generally attract leniant punishments in South Korea by western standards. Part of that goes to a cultural belief by South Koreans that most people are intrinsically good and bad behaviour like this is just a result of good people losing their way.

The recent presidential scandal is emblematic of this problem. While the punishment for this behaviour remains light, the behaviour will continue.

Reply Score: 1

Capitalism, risk-taking and incentives
by project_2501 on Tue 17th Jan 2017 09:14 UTC
project_2501
Member since:
2006-03-20

Tough punishments would be counterproductive, and not for the wider good.

Let me explain.

In order for progress to continue we need innovation. In order to make innovation worth the risk we need to give huge rewards solvents to winners. Otherwise the is incentive to take the risk to innovate. Risk meana family I'll lure as well as success.

Part of the deal between society and entrepreneurs is that society will permit them a small level of bending the rules.

This is why we mustn't punish or demonise big successful corrosions and hugs leaders like Samsung's or Microsoft's.

Not.

Reply Score: 2

Kochise Member since:
2006-03-03

Yeah, tax evasion and shareholding is such an innovation that those who take the risk should be rewarded with more shares and fortune.

http://fortune.com/2017/01/16/world-richest-men-income-equality/

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/01/16/world/eight-richest-wealth-oxfam....

http://www.breitbart.com/big-government/2017/01/16/worlds-8-richest...

BTW, do not forget we are in global economic crisis, there's no wealth anywhere to provide the poors and the labors with some increased sustains and wages.

Not.

Edited 2017-01-17 16:14 UTC

Reply Score: 2

Imagine if Steve Jobs and Bill Gates
by Mr. Dee on Wed 18th Jan 2017 04:01 UTC
Mr. Dee
Member since:
2005-11-13

Were both accused of tax evasion, but both could end up creating trillion dollar economies that could provide jobs both direct and indirectly. Are you gonna arrest them then?

Sorry, but there are bigger issues in this world than siphoning off some of your company's money.

Reply Score: 1

Kochise Member since:
2006-03-03

"siphoning off some of your company's money"

Well, considering that these companies avoid taxes, governments have to get their incomes from other sources, hence siphoning off their citizens.

But these companies are not always creating the jobs in the countries they evade taxes from, hence it is double pain in the ass for the citizens.

No jobs, no taxes incomes. Applause.

And I believed slavery was reformed some centuries ago, because you know, these companies already performs wages leveraging to prevent raises.

Reply Score: 2