Linked by Thom Holwerda on Wed 10th May 2017 08:41 UTC
BeOS & Derivatives

Haiku has been accepted into Google Summer of Code again this year, and over the past few days the project has detailed some of the areas developers will be focusing on. For instance, Vivek will be working to bring 3D hardware acceleration to Haiku:

The Mesa renderer in Haiku presently ventures into software rendering. Haiku uses software for rendering frame buffers and then writes them to the graphics hardware. The goal of my project is to port Direct Rendering Manager (DRM) Driver for i915, from the Linux kernel to Haiku with the help of DragonflyBSD's Linux Compatibility layer, so that those drivers can be later extended to add OpenGL support (Mesa3D) for hardware accelerated 3D rendering.

Other projects include bringing Harfbuzz support to Haiku, building a Haiku preferences pane (blasphemy to an old BeOS user such as myself, but entirely a 100% good idea for normal people), developing a calendar application, and adding Btrfs write support.

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Comment by drcouzelis
by drcouzelis on Wed 10th May 2017 12:33 UTC
drcouzelis
Member since:
2010-01-11

I look forward to the progress! ;)

It's easy for me to think, "But I'm not ever going to use those features...", but then I remember that the more features that get added to Haiku the more it becomes a viable alternative mainstream operating system.

Reply Score: 4

RE: Comment by drcouzelis
by The123king on Wed 10th May 2017 12:45 UTC in reply to "Comment by drcouzelis"
The123king Member since:
2009-05-28

It is a viable alternative operating system. There are no other non-*nix FOSS OSes that can even hold a candle to Haiku. It's stable, feature-rich, has a reasonable library of software, and has a reasonably large following.

I just wish it had more "killer apps", such as a native office suite, or a virtualisation solution like VBox. Though i think someone ported OpenOffice (or was it KOffice) via Haiku's 3rd party QT port

Reply Score: 3

RE[2]: Comment by drcouzelis
by lproven on Thu 11th May 2017 12:39 UTC in reply to "RE: Comment by drcouzelis"
lproven Member since:
2006-08-23

May I suggest a far more modest target?

DosEmu.

If I could multitask a few DOS apps on it, I could use it for real productive work.

Reply Score: 2

RE[3]: Comment by drcouzelis
by darknexus on Thu 11th May 2017 15:27 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Comment by drcouzelis"
darknexus Member since:
2008-07-15

If I could multitask a few DOS apps on it, I could use it for real productive work.

I did that using screen and separate instances of DOSEmu. It's not technically multitasking under DOS but it is multitasking DOS apps. The real problem was if an app required raw keyboard mode (WordPerfect 6.0) then the keystrokes for screen wouldn't be an option so I used a separate virtual console to run that one and did some sort of special keyboard exception for the key to switch vc (though I forget exactly how I did that last bit). Ah, the old days...

Reply Score: 2

RE[2]: Comment by drcouzelis
by JLF65 on Thu 11th May 2017 16:19 UTC in reply to "RE: Comment by drcouzelis"
JLF65 Member since:
2005-07-06

There are no other non-*nix FOSS OSes that can even hold a candle to Haiku.


You might want to qualify that to "few" rather than "no". I can think of a few, and one right of the top of my head: AROS. Arguably, it's further along than Haiku, already having hw accelerated video, and being on far more platforms, with far more software available.

Reply Score: 2

RE[3]: Comment by drcouzelis
by cb88 on Thu 11th May 2017 17:41 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Comment by drcouzelis"
cb88 Member since:
2009-04-23

AROS doesn't even have memory Protection.... making it rather dated. And part of the main reason they could get hw acceleration working as fast as they did... it's a bit hacked up.

Certainly not in the same class of usable as Haiku.

Edited 2017-05-11 17:42 UTC

Reply Score: 2

RE[4]: Comment by drcouzelis
by JLF65 on Fri 12th May 2017 02:10 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: Comment by drcouzelis"
JLF65 Member since:
2005-07-06

Memory protection has NOTHING to do with usability. Usability is having stable apps that cover what people want to do. Computers ran without memory protection for decades, and many still do. Granted, it means you need to be more careful about viruses, but I don't think I've ever even heard of one targeting AROS.

Reply Score: 2

A Couple More
by Pro-Competition on Wed 10th May 2017 18:22 UTC
Pro-Competition
Member since:
2007-08-20

Yes, this is encouraging. Here are a couple more that just got added to the Haiku website today:

https://www.haiku-os.org/blog/a-star/2017-05-10_%5Bgsoc_2017~*~@...

https://www.haiku-os.org/blog/return0e/2017-05-10_%5Bgsoc_2017~*...

Looking forward to progress in all of these areas!

Reply Score: 2

Pref pane
by Morgan on Wed 10th May 2017 23:14 UTC
Morgan
Member since:
2005-06-29

I'm not too keen on copying the macOS/Ubuntu/Win10 preference pane either, though the Haiku mockup at least looks BeOS-y.

I recently acquired a Lenovo ThinkCentre dated around 2005, a Pentium D based machine, which runs the current snapshot of Haiku exceptionally well. I now have a reasonably fast and very stable Haiku box again, and I can retire the dying Dell PIII desktop I'd been running it on. I don't know if the Lenovo's "Broadwater-G" Intel graphics will be covered under the new i915 accelerated driver (it's technically the same family as the GMA950), but I'll keep my fingers crossed.

Reply Score: 2

RE: Pref pane
by Pro-Competition on Wed 10th May 2017 23:30 UTC in reply to "Pref pane"
Pro-Competition Member since:
2007-08-20

I'm not too keen on copying the macOS/Ubuntu/Win10 preference pane either, though the Haiku mockup at least looks BeOS-y.


I think the design leaves the existing menu-based items intact, for people who prefer the original way, so you can just ignore the new combined panel if you want.

Reply Score: 2

RE[2]: Pref pane
by daedalus on Thu 11th May 2017 08:32 UTC in reply to "RE: Pref pane"
daedalus Member since:
2011-01-14

That's the ideal solution that should keep most people happy...

Reply Score: 2

RE: Pref pane
by henderson101 on Thu 11th May 2017 08:24 UTC in reply to "Pref pane"
henderson101 Member since:
2006-05-30

The pref pane was already in the latest unreleased versions of BeOS. I think it would have been part of whatever UI BeIA gave the user. One of the hacked versions (PhOS?) had it included IIRC.

Reply Score: 2

Eternally in Alpha?
by yahya on Mon 15th May 2017 14:19 UTC
yahya
Member since:
2007-03-29

Sure, adding new features is more fun, but when the last official release is a five year old alpha, doesn't it look like something is wrong about the priorities?

Reply Score: 2